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Ups and Downs of Paris Fashion

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History 3rd Edition 2017

Book chapter

Nous sortions d’une époque de guerre, d’uniformes, de femmessoldats aux carrures de boxeurs. Je dessinai des femmes-fleurs, épaules douces, bustes épanouis, tailles fines comme lianes et jupes larges comme corolles.ChristianDior, Christian Dior et moi (Paris: Amiot-Domont, 1956), p. 35. Translation in text by Valerie Steele.

Elvis Presley

Fiona Corbridge

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Elvis Presley’s ascent from impoverished childhood to worldwide fame as a singer and actor in the 1950s allowed him to indulge a love of clothes that began as a teenager. A career of over twenty years established a sharp-dressing persona, graduating into extravagant stage attire in the 1970s. The shock of his early death only served to increase the public’s fascination with him and to immortalize him as a cultural icon. Elvis’s handsome image continues to reassert itself in the early twenty-first

Three Generations of Moroccan Fashion Designers

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity 2015

Book chapter

The first generation of Moroccan fashion designers consisted of women of the Moroccan élite with no formal training in fashion design. They merely had the advantage of growing up with the luxuryluxury of high-quality craftsmanshipcraftsmanship and learned to sow and embroider at a young age, since this was considered an important part of their privileged educationeducation.Personal communication Tamy Tazi (fashion designer), July 9, 2004. They were ‘products’ of the nationalist movement in that t

Icons of Modernity: Sixties Fashion and Youth Culture

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture 2015

Book chapter

One of the first media reports on mods, under the headline “Faces without Shadows” and published in Town Magazine in September 1962, provides insight into the consumer practices of these youths (see partial reprint in Rawlings 2000: 42–7). The article revolves around the fifteen-year-old Feld, MarkMark Feld (later, Marc Bolan of the band T-Rex) and his twenty-year-old friends Sugar, PeterPeter Sugar and Simmonds, MichaelMichael Simmonds living in the London neighborhood Stoke Newington. They desc

Style Narratives: Sixties in the Twenty-First Century

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture 2015

Book chapter

Music has been described by many of the sixties enthusiasts I interviewed to be at the core of, if not initiating, their interest in the sixties, indicating the significant role music plays in the development of style. Music affects our bodybody, moving inside from the outside. Baacke, DieterDieter Baacke describes it as a phenomenon that “storms our senses”—one that penetrates and moves the body, it drives our corporealitycorporeality and expression, it gets us to dance, to tap with our feet, or

Edie Sedgwick

Stephanie Kramer

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

In the canon of fashion tastemakers, Edie Sedgwick remains both a legend and a mystery. In her short twenty-eight years, the Santa Barbara, California native was a socialite, heiress, artist, actress, model, New York scenester, and 1965’s anointed “Girl of the Year.” From her affiliation with Andy Warhol and the artistic community of the Factory to her collaboration with designer Betsey Johnson, to her stints as a model for Vogue, Sedgwick’s contribution to the world of fashion was undoubtedly a

Janis Joplin

Stephanie Kramer

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

As the 1960s became defined by social upheaval, free thinking, and unbridled creative output, perhaps no other female figure embodied the zeitgeist more than singer Janis Joplin. She channeled a profound feeling of alienation into an inimitable performance style, and as her singing career flourished, her fashion style developed into the veritable quintessence of the countercultural look. An amalgam of a diverse range of sources, Joplin’s style was at once boyish yet delicate, earthy yet ethereal,

Book chapter

It is widely acknowledged that fashion is modern. If one adopts David Frisby’s definition of modernité as ‘the more general experience of the aestheticization of everyday life, as exemplified in the transitory qualities of an urban culture shaped by the imperatives of fashion, consumerism, and constant innovation,’ fashion is proto-typically modern. (Stewart 2008: xii)

Skinheads

Else Skjold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The skinhead style emerged in the 1960s in London as a fusion between “rude boy” style and “mod” style, and is as such a subgenre of the working-class street style that emerged after World War II. The name of the style refers to the characteristic shaved hairdo, which is often associated with racism and violence. But actually, the style is a characteristic example of the bridging between black and white cultures that goes back decades, even hundreds of years, in Western menswear. Stylistically, i

Greasers

Else Skjold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

“Greasers” were devotees of a subcultural style originally for young, working-class men (later also women) that emerged in the 1950s in the United States. The word “grease” refers to the wax or pomade used to make the characteristic hairdo of the look, which also typically included biker boots, jeans, T-shirts, and leather jackets. Groupings of greasers would often appear in motorcycle gangs around the emerging rock ’n’ roll scene, and parts of the subculture formed the motorcycle club “Hell’s An

New Challenges: 1960s–1980s

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

A common misconception is that by the 1960s women stopped sewing and making their own clothes due to the mass of inexpensive, readily available ready-to-wear options. However, the 1960s were actually a boom period. The Barron’s article “Profitable Patterns” (1958) reported that pattern companies were generally profitable, with the exception of Vogue. The parent company, Condé Nast, was publishing several magazines and running the pattern division, which operated at a loss. However, the losses “ar

Sedimenting The Youth Market

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Cinema and Television Advertising For Menswear

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Menswear Advertising In Newspapers and Magazines

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Poster Publicity and Menswear

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

‘You Bring The Body, We’ve Got The Clothes’: Publicity For Tailors

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

From Dummies to Dandies

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Ironing Out The Creases: Artificial Fibres and Menswear Advertising

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Synthesizing Sex: Publicity for Artificial and Natural Fibres

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Looking Good, Feeling Good: Materiality and The Interplay of The Senses

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

The Jeans Market and Advertising Between 1950 and 1985

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Coco Chanel and Socialist Fashion Magazines

Djurdja Bartlett

Source: Fashion Media. Past and Present 2013

Book chapter

The encounter between Coco Chanel and the world’s first socialist country—the Bolshevik Russia—did not happen in the early 1920s when both Chanel and socialism were still modernist projects. Following the 1917 October revolution, the Bolsheviks embraced the speed of the new era, worshiped the machine and acknowledged a crisis in the representation of the female gender. Moreover, the main Bolshevik artistic supporters—the constructivists—chose geometric abstraction as their visual language. In tha

1944–2011: Postwar Revivalism and Transorientalism

Adam Geczy

Source: Fashion and Orientalism. Dress, Textiles and Culture from the 17th to the 21st Century 2013

Book chapter

To call the toga or the mandarin’s gown ‘chic’ is to suggest a process of change which barely existed in ancient Rome or China; the clothes of the beefeater of the samurai are eminently respectable, precisely because they are not up to date; the tarboosh was never ‘all the go’ for it has never gone.

Introduction to Subcultural Body Style

Therèsa M. Winge

Source: Body Style 2012

Book chapter

After World War II, subcultures surfaced with prominence in urban spaces within Western culture (Thompson 1998). Scholars speculate that these subcultures formed because of shared issues and common needs that set them apart from mainstream culture and society (Cohen 1955). Over time, the term “subculture” gained negative connotations for four primary reasons. First, the very term “subculture” has a prefix of “sub,” which suggests something lower or below. Second, subculture members often come fro

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