Results: Text (439) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 439 (18 pages)
    Page 1 of 18
Seeing the blur—perception, cool, and mechanized speed (1910–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

speedindustrialised consciousness; panoramic perception; Virilio, PaulAlthough the now-ubiquitous image of bikini, shades, and sun-lounger might suggest that the ideal wearer of sunglasses enjoys the luxury of being blissfully inert, the dynamic power, excess, and seductive glamor of men and women speeding along in shades is undeniable—from the tough sheen of Marlon Brando in The Wild Ones to twenty-first century pop acts like Britney SpearsBritney Spears in “Toxic,” where impenetrable diamond-st

Seeing in the light—“sun”glasses, modern glamor, cool, and celebrity (1920s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Today, a more general sense that sunglasses protect our eyes from sunlight dominates. After all, the name finally settled on for all kinds of motor goggles, protective spectacles, autoglasses, and so on was (and is) sunglasses, conjuring up countless images of those bikini-clad women and casual, white linen-clad men basking in the glow of their own attractiveness, their sunglasses bouncing back that gold-colored light of happiness and success. Smiling or not, these men and women are embodiments o

Seeing in the dark—sunglasses and “outsider” cool (1940s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Many of the most evocative images show sunglasses worn in the dark, indoors, possibly because in these images we are forced to acknowledge their more oblique functions. Layers of darkness and blackness are compounded by dark frames with dark lenses in many of these images; think of Miles Davis in a murky club, in a dark suit, what light there is just highlighting the sheen of his skin against the intense glossy blackness of his shades.

Heading for the shade—the spread of outsider cool (1950s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

outsiderSunglasses were tactically used by people who were “outside” the goals and means of dominant society, as part of an articulation of a dissonant style which held an attraction just as great as that of those sunny images of “straight” success and leisure. This chapter will show how the more complex connotations of “outsider cool” became desirable and were appropriated by the “mainstream” in the 1950s and 1960s and beyond. Sunglasses could act as a sign of a “bettered self”—but they also sta

Seeing in the “eclipse”—sunglasses, cool, and the absence of meaning (late 1950s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Warhol, Andyglamorempty (or hollow) glamorThe light is artificial and mirrors are provided, but not windows, because the characters must be protected from bleak, bruising reality.

Kate Moss

Karen de Perthuis

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Kate Moss is one of the world’s most photographed women, a blank slate for contemporary dreams and desires. With a career spanning three decades, she is a rare enduring phenomenon in an industry defined by ephemerality and a brutal quest for novelty. In the summer of 1988, she was fourteen when spotted by model agent Sarah Doukas at JFK airport—a bored teenager from the London suburb of Croydon with almond eyes, cupid-bow lips, and “God-given bone structure.” She would soon become a fashion model

Article

The omnipresent significance of the eighteenth century and the masked ball for the House of Dior found expression in the design of “Angie” for the “Masquerade and Bondage” collection, a short variation on 1760s court dress, paraphrasing the fashionable life and cruel fate of Marie Antoinette. Using the surface of the hip panels as a canvas for narrative and caricaturized embroideries, the dress becomes an epitome of storytelling through dressmaking, evoking crucial episodes of French history. Gal

Alexander McQueen for Givenchy, Fall/Winter 2000

Lydia Edwards

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

“I can’t be too literal with my references,” Alexander McQueen said in 2000, when asked to pinpoint the theme of a recent collection. “It’s a number of references culminating together to make one idea.” Nevertheless, with a researched family history dating back to the 1500s, McQueen always acknowledged that “Every part of my background comes from something, be it the Jacobites or the Huguenots,” and influences from Giovanni Bellini to André Courrèges can be glimpsed in his collections. The pieces

Couture Shows of the 2000s

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Haute couture’s economic feasibility remained questionable throughout the 2000s, though ateliers were supported by increased patronage from Chinese, Indian, Middle Eastern and Russian clients. Hundreds of petites mains shut down their businesses, while a minority were purchased by houses. Several labels conceded their haute couture memberships; however, the Chambre Syndicale also inducted a handful of new houses and welcomed Armani Privé as a “corresponding member.” Prospective couturiers could m

Three Generations of Moroccan Fashion Designers

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity 2015

Book chapter

The first generation of Moroccan fashion designers consisted of women of the Moroccan élite with no formal training in fashion design. They merely had the advantage of growing up with the luxuryluxury of high-quality craftsmanshipcraftsmanship and learned to sow and embroider at a young age, since this was considered an important part of their privileged educationeducation.Personal communication Tamy Tazi (fashion designer), July 9, 2004. They were ‘products’ of the nationalist movement in that t

Icons of Modernity: Sixties Fashion and Youth Culture

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture 2015

Book chapter

One of the first media reports on mods, under the headline “Faces without Shadows” and published in Town Magazine in September 1962, provides insight into the consumer practices of these youths (see partial reprint in Rawlings 2000: 42–7). The article revolves around the fifteen-year-old Feld, MarkMark Feld (later, Marc Bolan of the band T-Rex) and his twenty-year-old friends Sugar, PeterPeter Sugar and Simmonds, MichaelMichael Simmonds living in the London neighborhood Stoke Newington. They desc

Style Narratives: Sixties in the Twenty-First Century

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture 2015

Book chapter

Music has been described by many of the sixties enthusiasts I interviewed to be at the core of, if not initiating, their interest in the sixties, indicating the significant role music plays in the development of style. Music affects our bodybody, moving inside from the outside. Baacke, DieterDieter Baacke describes it as a phenomenon that “storms our senses”—one that penetrates and moves the body, it drives our corporealitycorporeality and expression, it gets us to dance, to tap with our feet, or

Alexandre Herchcovitch

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Paul Smith, Fall/Winter 2000

Michael P. Londrigan

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Paul Smith is a world-renowned English designer who has created numerous collections over the years. Paul Smith has built a global empire covering women’s wear, children’s wear, accessories, and menswear. His menswear collection of fall/winter 2000 will be examined while comparing and contrasting his unique style to events in the world that were having an impact on fashion.

Street Style: A Brief History

Brent Luvaas

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Over the last couple of decades, the meaning of the term “street style,” both within and outside of the fashion industry, has shifted profoundly from a description of the urban subcultural styles that emerged out of “the street” to those ordinary—but still stylish—forms of dress worn by “real people” in their everyday lives, to, finally, just another genre of fashion photography that captures the looks of fashion insiders outside runway shows. This article provides a brief history of the concept

Christian Dior Ready-to-Wear, Spring/Summer 2000

Hayley-Jane Mazières

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

When John Galliano was appointed by Bernard Arnault as the creative director at the French fashion house of Givenchy in 1995, he became the first British designer to lead an established Parisian brand. In fall 1996, he set the bar higher when he became responsible for Christian Dior’s haute couture, accessories, and ready-to-wear lines. Instantly remarked on with his graduate collection, “Les Incroyables,” presented in 1984 at London’s college of Central Saint Martins, John Galliano had been favo

Jazz Style on the Catwalk, 1970s–2000s

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

From 1970 to 2000, the influence of jazz culture on the women’s catwalk is pinpointed by the confluence of masculine and feminine details. Designers, during the three decades, interpreted the tuxedo and double-breasted suit that were standardized uniforms of early jazz musicians. Particularly for African American performers, these formal garments bolstered access to mainstream culture, social and economic equality, celebrity, and musical distinction. These utilities are paramount to its exhibitio

Swimwear on the Catwalk, 1980–2000

Ciara Phipps

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This article will discuss the key styles, trends, and designers of women’s swimwear on the catwalk through the 1980s, 1990s, and early 2000s. It will discuss the impact of body image and the associated attitudes toward the body on the development and design of swimwear. The influence of Brazilian swimwear infiltrated Europe and America in the 1970s. The appearance of the tanga on the beaches of Rio de Janeiro, alongside the design of the thong by Gernreich in 1974, set in motion the body-baring s

Valentino Couture, Fall/Winter 2000

Rosily Roberts

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

In 2000, Valentino celebrated forty years in the fashion industry with a series of events and a special display of his previous designs. This collection, created in the midst of this period of self-reflection and celebration, is a witness to that. There are clear references among the garments to previous designs and the fashions of the previous century, which Valentino looks to for inspiration. His fall/winter 2000 designs are slimmer and more revealing than those of the 1980s, displaying more of

Calvin Klein Collection, Calvin Klein, Spring/Summer 2000

Linda Welters

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Calvin Klein’s spring/summer 2000 menswear collection displayed all of the features that the New York designer had become known for during his illustrious career. Klein’s collection featured minimalist styles in luxurious, neutral-colored fabrics with a hint of sexuality. This collection was shown at a pivotal time in the company’s history, when Klein and his business partner Barry Schwartz were trying to sell the company, which had retail sales of $5 billion. Klein himself had overseen the desig

Reinvention and Renaissance: 1980s–2010

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

The 1980s witnessed a burst of computer technological. The technology was incorporated in pattern companies’ business practices in manufacturing and marketing procedures. By 1991, when restricted commercial use of the Internet was lifted, pattern companies embraced it to rapidly market their designs. Companies began to use computer applications to trim costs, to improve inventory control, and to boost productivity. For example, Simplicity used an application to streamline procedures for processi

Introduction

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

When Western clothing began to reveal the shape of the body in the twelfth century, cloth needed to be cut into shapes and the shapes became more complex in each century, thus requiring guides or patterns to form appropriate shapes to fit the body. The paper pattern ultimately became that guide; however, as Frieda Sorber observed in the exhibition catalog Patterns from the MoMu in Antwerp, “The history of the paper pattern is almost as elusive as the ephemeral nature of the object itself” (Heaven

Şule Yüksel Şenler: An Early Style Icon of Urban Islamic Fashion in Turkey

Rustem Ertug Altinay

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The formative years of the Republic of Turkey were characterized by a series of social and legal reforms implemented under the leadership of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk in order to construct a secular (albeit implicitly Sunni Muslim), modern, Western nation-state with an authentic Turkish essence. In Turkey’s modernization and nation-building program, women were imagined as the builders of a new life, ‘a modern way of living both in the private and the public spaces’ (Göle 1997: 51). They were expected

Covering Up on the Prairies: Perceptions of Muslim Identity, Multiculturalism and Security in Canada

A. Brenda Anderson and F. Volker Greifenhagen

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The Canadian mediaOur analysis is restricted to the English-language media and does not include French Canadian publications. tend to portray headcovering as a practice that is forced on women; one can never assume that it is the women’s free choice.For example, ‘The majority of women wearing face coverings are not doing so because of free will; they are doing so because some Neanderthal husband or cleric has told them it is necessary’ (Martinuk 2011; see also Bramham 2010; Kay 2010). According t

‘I Love My Prophet’: Religious Taste, Consumption and Distinction in Berlin

Synnøve Bendixsen

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The majority of mosque associations and prayer rooms in Berlin were established by the so-called first-generation migrants who arrived as guest workers in Germany in the late 1960s and early 1970s. These religious organizations and places are mostly divided along ethno-national lines in terms of their participants, language of instruction and religious references. In contrast, the religious youth organization MJD was established in 1994 by eight young Muslims with various ethnic and national back

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 439 (18 pages)
Page 1 of 18