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Development of Dressmaking Patterns: 1800–1860

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

Through the eighteenth century, methods for communicating the latest fashions were limited to word of mouth, fashion dolls known as Pandoras, fashion plates such as Galerie des Modes, and publications for professional tailors.

1815–1871: Turkophilia, Afromania and the Indes

Adam Geczy

Source: Fashion and Orientalism. Dress, Textiles and Culture from the 17th to the 21st Century 2013

Book chapter

Yet neither high Egyptian nights nor the black and opulent coffee with cardamom seed nor the frequent literary discussions with the Doctors of the Law nor the venerable muslin turban nor the meals eaten with his fingers made him forget his British reticence, the delicate central solitude of the masters of the earth.

Tweed

Fiona Anderson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Tweed cloth originated in Scotland in the early nineteenth century. At that time, it was only made from woolen yarns in the twill weave. From the 1820s to the present, tweed has been characterized by a huge range of color and weave effects. The main account given for the origins of the name tweed is that it is based on a misreading of the Scottish word tweel or twill (which was the weave characteristic of Scottish woolens at that time) for tweed. By the 1840s, tweed was established as a term used

Belgium

Karlijn Bronselaer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Belgium played a vital role in the industrialization of the European textile industry. Belgian society changed very quickly due to industrialization during the first half of the nineteenth century. From about the 1820s on the fashionable silhouette in West Europe was the hourglass. Although the average Belgian had neither time nor money for fashion, improved production methods and sewing machines made corsets more affordable. Later, the Art Nouveau or Jugendstil movement (ca. 1890–1920), with its

Godey’s Lady’s Book

Colleen R. Callahan

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Convict Dress in Australia

Julia Clark, Linda Clark, Kim Simpson, Ian Terry and Elspeth Wishart

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Following the American War of Independence, Britain could no longer send convicts there, so one hundred and sixty thousand convicts were transported to the Australian colonies between 1788 and 1868. Their management, including clothing, was an enormous undertaking. Colonial penal authorities aimed to regulate convicts, make them easily identifiable, and classify them within the penal system. However, it was difficult to establish a coherent clothing system. Until the 1820s, convict clothing was o

Portugal

Paula C. G. da Costa Soares

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Changes in Portuguese dress have closely followed political developments, with the 1974 revolution marking the biggest turning point. During the dictatorship, dress styles were conservative, fashion was class based, and low incomes forced most families to be economical in their consumption of clothes. The 1974 Carnation Revolution led to a revolution in fashion as well, with the emergence of a plethora of informal dress styles that were associated with equality and democracy. In the 1980s and 199

Brummell, George (Beau)*

Alison Matthews David

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Settler Dress in Australia

Damayanthie Eluwawalage

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Clothing was a problematic aspect of the social and cultural life of colonial Australia from the time of first settlement in 1788. Apart from military officers and civil officials, much everyday clothing was working-class wear. Yet fashionable dress was soon to become a key aspect of cultural practice, emphasizing the social status and power of the elite and aspirational elite, as well as being a symbolic indicator of class. Status signals were important in this fledgling society made up of dispa

American Immigrants of West European Origin

Judy Zaccagnini Flynn

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The dress of North American immigrants from Western Europe is a reflection of the evolution of their sociocultural experience as they went from their homelands to the New World. Immigration has existed from the early times of settlement in North America to the present. Western Europe (defined in 1890 as Italy, Spain, France, Great Britain, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, Netherlands, Austria-Hungry, Switzerland, France, and Luxembourg) provided the largest number of immigrants to the United Sta

The Plains

Adriana Greci Green

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Plains is a vast region comprising the central portion of the entire North American continent. Very little is known about the dress of the prehistoric inhabitants of the Plains, although there is evidence of Paleo-Indian human occupation dating back at least 13,000 years. These early inhabitants originally hunted mammoths and later pursued the buffalo herds that roamed the great expanses of grassland, as well as elk, deer, antelope, and mountain sheep. A few ornaments, primarily bone, stone,

Evening Dress

Jane E. Hegland

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Although formal court dress has existed for centuries, there is consensus among dress historians that evening dress materialized as a discrete category in the mid-1820s. It is probably not coincidental that this form of dress emerged at roughly the same time the Romantic Movement in art and literature surfaced as an influence in European and American cultures. Romantics accentuated passion and sentiment, placing a greater emphasis on love rather than on duty. Other cultural factors such as increa

Between East and West—Elite Fashions and Political Change in the Romanian Principalities, 1774–1850

Angela Jianu

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Foreign observers often remarked on the love of luxury among Greek and Romanian nobles at the Phanariot courts of Bucharest and Iasi. Details excepted, female and male figures looked very similar in long, ample vestments. When the Swedish painter Alexander Roslin painted Catherine the Great’s maid of honor, Moldavian Princess Zoe Ghika, in 1777, the sitter may have represented more than a pretty girl in exotic costume. The daughter of a former Phanariot prince of Moldavia, she had joined her fami

Colonial Influence on Dress in the Indian Subcontinent

Donald Clay Johnson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Queen Elizabeth I issued a royal charter to the Company of Merchants of London Trading into the East Indies (commonly known as the East India Company) on the last day of 1600. Thus began the official interactions between England and India, which two centuries later resulted in British political domination of the Indian Subcontinent. What the British wore in India overwhelmingly reflected London fashion rather than incorporating approaches to clothing that had evolved over millennia in India. This

The Textile Industry

Sara J. Kadolph and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Any overview of the textile industry in the United States and Canada will focus primarily on the United States until the latter part of the nineteenth century, as Canada and its textile production were still controlled by Britain until that time. Textile manufacture was one of the first mechanized industries to incorporate outwork production into its manufacturing procedures. An industry of hand-produced lace existed prior to the introduction of English lace machines in Ipswich, Massachusetts, in

Subcultural Dress

David Muggleton and Dunja Brill

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A subculture can be defined as a group with particular shared cultural features that distinguish it clearly from other subcultures and both the specific milieu (parent culture) and wider society (dominant culture) from which it emerges. The definition of culture on which this notion of a subculture is based is borrowed from anthropology and is taken to mean a whole way of life of a society or particular section thereof, depending on the level of analysis. A subculture can therefore be seen as a d

Resources: Collections of Colonial Dress and Fashion in Australia

Catherine Reade

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Colonial period in Australia began with the establishment of the penal colony of New South Wales in 1788 and ended with the federation of Australia’s six colonies in 1901. By this time the Australian population reached just over 3.7 million, although immigration and birth rates were in decline. During this period Australia attained many hallmarks of a modern society, including urban and regional centers with good shopping facilities, cultural and educational institutions, clothing manufacture

Baudelaire, Charles

Valerie Steele

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Grisettes, Cocottes, and Bohèmes: Fashion and Fiction in the 1820s

Denise Amy Baxter

Source: Fashion in Fiction. Text and Clothing in Literature, Film, and Television 2009

Book chapter

Shifting Currency: The Culture and Economy of the Second Hand Trade in England, c. 1600–1850

Beverly Lemire

Source: Old Clothes, New Looks. Second Hand Fashion 2005

Book chapter

In the long period of human history in the West before the full force of industrialization changed the world, the scarcity of goods ensured their careful husbanding. Use and reuse defined the everyday for all but a tiny minority of the population. However, by at least the late sixteenth century, dramatic and progressive changes in trade and manufacturing were stimulating regional economies, changing social relations, as scarcity slowly and very gradually began to give way before a rising abundanc

The Traveler’s Eye: Chinas Poblanas and European-inspired Costume in Postcolonial Mexico

Kimberly Randall

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Firstly, for a better understanding of the role that fashion played in the early independence period, a brief overview of colonial history and society is necessary. The personal experiences of those who participated in the conquest helped to shape the colonial experience, influencing the generations to come. These first Spanish settlers of Mexico or New Spain as it was known, included groups of lesser gentry, especially those young men who had been cut off from the family fortune by the rules of

Book chapter

‘I think I hear you saying, “Where the Deuce is Sydney Cove, Port Jackson?”’, wrote George Worgan, surgeon on the convict transport Sirius, in 1788. The First Fleet had sailed from Portsmouth harbour, England, on May 13, 1787: ‘the Cape of Good Hope was the last country touched at … where every article necessary for forming a civilised colony was provisioned and, thus equipped, each like another Noah’s Ark, eleven ships steered away for Botany Bay [Sydney]’ (Worgan, 1788: 1). Governor Arthur Phil

The Dandy: London’s New West End 1790–1830

Christopher Breward

Source: Fashioning London. Clothing and the Modern Metropolis 2004

Book chapter

April 13th 1845, - To-day, oddly enough, while I was engaged in re-reading Carlyle's ‘Philosophy of Clothes’, Count d'Orsay walked in. I had not seen him for four or five years. Last time he was as gay in his colours as a humming bird - blue satin cravat, blue velvet waistcoat, cream coloured coat lined with velvet of the same hue, trousers also of a bright colour, I forget what; white French gloves, two glorious breast-pins attached by a chain, and length enough of gold watch-guard to have hange

Introduction

Jennifer M. Jones

Source: Sexing La Mode. Gender, Fashion and Commercial Culture in Old Regime France 2004

Book chapter

An immoderate fondness for dress, for pleasure, and for sway, are the passions of savages; the passions that occupy those uncivilized beings who have not yet extended the dominion of the mind, or even learned to think with the energy necessary to concatenate that abstract train of thought which produces principles. And that women, from their education and the present state of civilized life, are in the same condition, cannot, I think, be controverted. To laugh at them then, or satirize the follie

African American Jewellery Before the Civil War

Helen Bradley Foster

Source: Beads and Bead Makers. Gender, Material Culture and Meaning 1998

Book chapter

African American men, women and children wore jewellery, including beads, during the period of enslavement.Throughout, I refer to citizens of the United States of America who claim African ancestry as either ‘African Americans’ or ‘Blacks’, spelled with a capital ‘B’. I refer to Americans of European descent as ‘whites’, without capitalization. My discussion includes descriptions and analyses of a range of jewellery, not only beads, because they interrelate. An excellent source of evidence for th

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