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Sophia Kokosalaki

Amber Jane Butchart

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Green

Emma Davenport

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Associated with cultural symbols of balance and belonging, historically green has been worn to convey hope, good health, and the supernatural. Twenty-first-century concerns about the fashion industry’s impact upon the environment have seen the expression and ethos “Green is the new black” gain currency. On the catwalk, the color green has been used by a variety of designers such as Daniel Hechter, Isaac Mizrahi, Hyper Hyper, Sportmax, and Thierry Mugler. Since the 1970s, fashion trends associated

Josephus Melchior Thimister

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Carven

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Agnès B

Laura Snelgrove

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Uniform

Jane Tynan

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Fashion imitating uniform, particularly military uniform, is nothing new. This article explores when, where, and why people wear clothes inspired by uniform, whether military, naval, medical, school, or police. It considers the popularity of the uniform theme on the catwalk, particularly in the post-1960s period. By tracing the social significance of regulation dress, the discussion highlights distinctions between the functional uniforms worn in institutional contexts and their appropriation by f

1690–1815: Chinoiserie, Indiennerie, Turquerie and Egyptomania

Adam Geczy

Source: Fashion and Orientalism. Dress, Textiles and Culture from the 17th to the 21st Century 2013

Book chapter

See, mademoiselle, how that goes well with your Chinese-style hairstyle, your mantle of peacock feathers, your petticoat of celadon and gold, your cinnamon bottoms and your shoes of jade…

Fashions for a Phoney War

Geraldine Howell

Source: Wartime Fashion. From Haute Couture to Homemade, 1939–1945 2012

Book chapter

Uniforms as Work Dress for Civilians and Military

Thomas S. Abler

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Uniforms are distinctive but standard forms of dress associated with particular occupations and/or social institutions and either supplied or regulated by the associated institution. In donning a uniform one assumes a social role. Since uniforms are often worn in hierarchal institutions, anyone wearing the same uniform can be expected to perform in a similar fashion in a given situation. In initial battles of World War II the soldiers and sailors of the United States wore the British-style steel

Uniforms

Nigel Arch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A uniform may be defined as a prescribed set of clothing peculiar to a distinct group of individuals within a society. It is distinguished by displays of hierarchy evident on parts of the dress and will usually also display emblems that act as signals only readily interpreted by other members of the group. Hierarchy is expressed in terms of rank, and badges of rank have appeared on such elements of uniform dress as the shoulder strap and cuffs of the upper body garment. Other symbols act as remin

Headdress

Beverly Chico

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Hairnets may be the oldest headdresses worn by humans. A mammoth-ivory figurine dated circa 36,000 B.C.E. and found at Brassempouy (Las Landes), France, shows a human face with hair possibly braided and covered with what appears to be a netting. Bronze Age second millennium B.C.E. hairnets of horsehair using the sprang or twisted-thread technique were found in Borum Eshøj, Denmark, and are preserved in the National Museum, Copenhagen. Complementing long, unfitted robes, a fashionable silk hairnet

Conventional Work Dress

Colleen Gau

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Historically, climate and work environments are primary to the selection and production of work clothing, but safety concerns, economic and business climates, fashion, and ethics find a place in the clothing narrative of Western civilizations. As crops and animals were domesticated, empires emerged in the Nile and Mediterranean regions, and the classification of skill groups became more distinct. Animal skins were replaced by woven garments by the time people had settled into communities. Herding

Heads of State and Dress

Suzanne Gott

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The modes of dress worn by African heads of state since independence have served as highly visible expressions of political philosophies and programs during different periods of national leadership. African leaders have also developed memorable trademark ensembles for projecting political personas.

Distinctive Dress of the Nazi Party

Mark Gudgel

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

This article addresses the significance and distinct aspects of uniform and dress in Nazi Germany (1933–1945), specifically related to the organization and membership of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei, the NSDAP or Nazi party. The Nazi entity is kept distinct from that of other German organizations that existed during that period to which non-Nazi German civilians may have belonged, as well as from the various branches of the German military which were populated with a very lo

Fascist and Nazi Dress

Irene Guenther

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Such reactionary, anti-Semitic, and rabidly nationalistic messages were repeated on countless occasions throughout the 1920s and early 1930s, so that by the time the Nazi Party came to power in 1933 the argument was clear. Only German clothing, specifically Aryan-designed and manufactured, was good enough for females in the Third Reich. Racially appropriate clothing depended upon the elimination of French and, especially, Jewish influences from the German fashion industry.

Lufthansa Uniforms

Regina Henkel

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Airline uniforms give an insight into the airline’s historical, economic, social, and gender-related values. They lend the otherwise-standardized flying services a distinctive appearance and enable the airlines to imbue their staff with cultural associations and emotions according to the prescribed image. From early on, the German airline, Lufthansa, focused efforts on the appearance of its employees.

Colonial Influence on Dress in the Indian Subcontinent

Donald Clay Johnson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Queen Elizabeth I issued a royal charter to the Company of Merchants of London Trading into the East Indies (commonly known as the East India Company) on the last day of 1600. Thus began the official interactions between England and India, which two centuries later resulted in British political domination of the Indian Subcontinent. What the British wore in India overwhelmingly reflected London fashion rather than incorporating approaches to clothing that had evolved over millennia in India. This

Olympic Dress, Uniforms, and Fashion

Karen LaBat and Susan L. Sokolowski

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the world of sport, the Olympics are the international catwalk to showcase innovation, brand identity, designer talent, national pride and athletic moments. The modern Olympics, 1896 to today, include winter and summer sporting events that can be used to promote a host country, highlight apparel companies’ new technologies and designs, and catapult athletes’ careers. The Olympics offer a prime opportunity for the introduction of innovative styles and technologies evident in both the opening an

The Social Significance of Institutional Dress in New Zealand

Bronwyn Labrum

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

As a settler colony, New Zealand inherited its range of institutions, their modes of operation, and their day-to-day practices from Britain. This legacy included the forms of institutional dress worn by institutional staff and residents, although they were modified to suit the distinctive economic, political, and cultural context that developed in the South Pacific nation. Often is it easier to find out about the experiences of staff whose activities appear in annual reports and institutional arc

Camouflage Cloth

John S. Major

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Individualizing Japanese Student Uniforms

Brian J. McVeigh

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In some cultures, sociopolitical environments encourage theatricality, rituality, and selves that are self-consciously performed, so that the bifurcation of the self into genuine expressions and social masks is more salient. The reasons behind this “splitting of the self” vary from place to place and from period to period. In any case, the need to separate the personal self from the public persona, backstage orchestrations from front-stage performances, and behind-the-curtains from before-the-foo

Antifashion in East Asian Dress: Power of Uniforms

Brian J. McVeigh

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion in East Asia reveals historical trajectories following the same path as Euro–American modernities. Modernization underpins the fashion-oriented consumerism visible today in Japan, China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, accounting for the interplay between fashion, counter-fashion, and antifashion. Counter-fashion is concerned with an interest in change and avant-garde styles. It may be associated with dissent, protest, or ridicule. Antifashion (commonly confused with counter-fashion) means styles

Muslim Dress and the Head-Scarf Debate

Annelies Moors

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Debates about the presence of students wearing head scarves in public schools in West Europe started in the late 1980s; about a decade later, the employment of women wearing head scarves also became the focus of attention. These debates need to be seen within a context in which a new generation of Muslims (often second-generation migrants) started to enter the educational system and then the labor market. As new Muslim citizens, these young men and women have increasingly become socially and poli

Yoruba “Uniforms” (Asọ Ebì)

Okechukwu Nwafor

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the Yoruba language asọ means “cloth,” while ebì means “family.” Literally, asọ ebì thus translates as “family cloth.” However, asọ ebì, in recent times, also refers to outfits with identical or very similar colors, tailoring, and combinations of garments worn by groups of friends or family members during important ceremonies such as weddings, birthday parties, and naming ceremonies, among others, to distinguish themselves from others. Various cultural and socioeconomic changes attended asọ eb

Asọ Ebì and Fashion Magazines in Nigeria

Okechukwu Nwafor

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

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