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Hermès

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Prada

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Mulberry

Amber Jane Butchart

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Louis Vuitton (house)

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Chloé

Morna Laing

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

The Handbag from the 1970s to 2000

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The need to collect, carry, and contain one’s belongings has existed for as long as humanity. From sacks to hold prehistoric flint and pouches for early coins to purses with contemporary cosmetics, various types of handbags have appeared in art and writing throughout history. While always fulfilling a practical function, handbags have also evolved with changing needs. They can be signifiers of fashion, social status, and even psychological state, as they mediate the boundaries between interior an

The Chanel “2.55” Handbag, Fall/Winter 1995

Julia Rea

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Since its introduction in February 1955, the “2.55” handbag has formed an integral and enduring part of the House of Chanel’s stylistic vocabulary of accessories. Its recurring role as an immediately recognizable and iconic symbol of both the brand’s unique heritage and contemporary identity is a rare example of a fashion object that embodies a contradictory blend of permanence and continuous renewal. By examining the historical context of the 2.55 bag through the lens of a contemporary version,

The Miser’s Purse

Laura L. Camerlengo

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Miser’s purses were one of the most popular purse styles in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Crafted in myriad colors and designs, they were made for personal use, as gifts to loved ones, or for commercial sale. These purses were deeply embedded in nineteenth-century popular culture as well. The development of the purse’s form and its social and symbolic roles can be explored by relating references found in nineteenth-century literature and paintings to accounts of these accessories found

A Brief History of the Purse up to 1930

Kathleen Campbell

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Purses, or handbags, have been a key component of a woman’s wardrobe for much of the 20th century and into the 21st. In recent years, handbags have evolved from chic accessories for carrying personal items to status symbols that may cost thousands of dollars. However, the first known purses developed centuries ago with different objectives in mind. The transformation of the form and function of the purse from ancient times through the 1920s reflects broad currents in social history, including the

Baby Carriers as Dress: DIY to Fashion Accessory

Mary Alice Chaney

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Regular people wear them, celebrities wear them, and they can be seen on prime-time television and commercials. Baby carriers are part of the landscape of child care products. Why should they be considered dress? A common term applied to using a baby carrier is babywearing. This term indicates that baby carriers are part of the system of nonverbal communication known as dress. In North America the use of baby carriers has evolved over time to include a variety of styles, to reflect different user

Hmong Baby Carriers

Mary Alice Chaney

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Hmong baby carriers are physically described, special physical characteristics discussed, and cultural meaning reviewed. The surface embellishment, general shape, and construction are covered. Special characteristics found on baby carriers such as the appliqué meander pattern, purpose of floral designs, and agricultural references are explained. Hmong baby carriers as a product of Hmong culture symbolize and reflect beliefs and values of the Hmong culture.

Helmet

Beverly Chico

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Prehistoric peoples probably wore woven basketry or hide head protectors; ancient Ethiopians used horse skulls, manes, and tails. Archaeological evidence reveals that rawhide caps and copper helmets, protecting ears and neck nape—with chin straps and padded wool or leather lining—were worn by Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian warriors during the third to first millennia B.C.E. Early Greek helmets were usually bronze hemispherical crowns. The Corinthian version incorporated a movable face mask; t

Bilas: Dressing the Body in Papua New Guinea

Michael Mel

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Papua New Guinea is a nation of some six million people in the twenty-first century and lies at the western end of the Pacific Ocean, north of Australia. It is the eastern half of the whole island of New Guinea, which is the second-largest island in the world after Greenland. It gained political independence from Australia in 1975. The nation has always both intrigued and fascinated people with one unusual factor: There are over eight hundred distinct languages spoken. This is an indication of th

Accessories of Dress

Celia Stall-Meadows

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The accessories industries in Canada and the United States are multibillion dollar industries that include many diverse product categories. Fashion accessories may be defined as fashion items that are carried or worn, and support or accent apparel fashions. Common accessories used by consumers in North America include hats and headwear, eyewear, scarves, shawls, neckties, handkerchiefs, pocket squares, gloves, belts, handbags, small personal leather goods, luggage, umbrellas, fans, and watches. M

Niue: Dress, Hats, and Woven Accessories

Hilke Thode-Arora

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The small Polynesian island of Niue is one of the highest coral islands in the world. Only its plateau, rising with steep cliffs above a jagged coastline, can be inhabited. Throughout Niue’s history droughts and famines have been experienced with regularity. There are no rivers on the island, and, although soil is fertile, vast stretches of land have been exhausted by shifting cultivation and ill-advised agricultural programs of the past. The soil is easily blown off by frequent and often devasta

Pacific Patterns

Graeme Were and Susanne Küchler

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

For many, pattern and decoration express an ideology of visual pleasure, but the often-ostentatious designs fashioned by Pacific Islanders from fragile leaf fronds and imported fabrics tell a different story. Stamped or stenciled, plaited or bound, pattern making in the Pacific is concerned with making relations to identity and to land tangible in the most striking ways and the most economic fashion. Though trivialized and hence overlooked—especially for those patterns created by women on the sur

Morrales in Guatemala

Kathryn Rousso

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

As in many regions of the world, the indigenous people of Guatemala devised ways to make baskets and bags from local materials to carry and contain objects. One of these is called the morral (net bag), and it is still used by villagers living in rugged mountainous terrain where walking long distances is part of life. Their traje (traditional clothing) does not have pockets, and morrales are necessary to carry food, tools, clothing, and other items needed in the fields or market or on the journey.

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