Results: Text (18) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 18 of 18 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
1815–1871: Turkophilia, Afromania and the Indes

Adam Geczy

Source: Fashion and Orientalism. Dress, Textiles and Culture from the 17th to the 21st Century 2013

Book chapter

Yet neither high Egyptian nights nor the black and opulent coffee with cardamom seed nor the frequent literary discussions with the Doctors of the Law nor the venerable muslin turban nor the meals eaten with his fingers made him forget his British reticence, the delicate central solitude of the masters of the earth.

Morocco

Cynthia J. Becker

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Morocco has long been a crossroads between Europe, the Middle East, and sub-Saharan Africa, and dress reflects the richness of its history as well as its geographic and cultural diversity. Forty to sixty percent of the Moroccan population is Berber, and many Berbers have retained their indigenous language. After the Phoenicians and then the Romans settled in Morocco and encountered the Berbers, Arabs moved into Morocco in the seventh century, founding the city of Fes and gradually converting the

The Shawl and the Head Cover

Rosemary Crill

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A draped, uncut length of cloth has been the basis of Indian male and female dress since the earliest times. This draped cloth has taken many forms, with the turban, sari, and dhoti having been the major components of dress across India for centuries. The focus on wrapped, untailored lengths of cloth altered with the arrival of the Kushans in the second century b.c.e. and in the wake of closer contacts with Central Asia through migrations and trade. Later, under the influence of Muslim culture fr

Accessories

Valerie Cumming

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

There is a debate about whether accessories are “essential” or “additional to dress.” From 1800 onwards, there are relatively few new accessories; some gradually disappeared, and others became increasingly important, their roles reflecting a changing world. Many times those actually producing these goods could themselves afford only basic, practical items. Certain crafts were more suited to mechanized production—knitted goods like stockings and printed fabrics—others, like millinery, beaded bags,

The Kashmir Shawl: A Historical Study

Janet Rizvi

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Kashmir produced export-quality textiles from at least the fourteenth century onwards, although the nature of the earliest ones is uncertain. By the late sixteenth century, fine Kashmir textiles were identified as shawl, meaning a twill-woven fabric in pashmina (cashmere) sourced from western Tibet. This material was made up not only as shoulder mantles but also as waist girdles, and in lengths to be tailored into men’s garments, as well as other forms. Only in the nineteenth century was the term

The Kashmir Shawl and Its Use in the Indo-Islamic World and Europe

Janet Rizvi

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

For the entire period of its known history, the classic Kashmir shawl, woven in twill tapestry from the finest trans-Himalayan goat pashm (cashmere), was manufactured as an export item, destined for the highest end of the market in plains India, Afghanistan, Iran, and the Ottoman Empire, and later in Europe and the United States. The industry was highly structured, and its output was tailored to the demand of particular markets. Merchants from foreign countries traveled to Srinagar, Kashmir’s cap

Lithuania: Ethnic Dress

Ruta Saliklis

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Lithuania, situated in northeastern Europe on the Baltic Sea, was until the twentieth century a nation of people living off the land. Up until 1970, more than half of Lithuania’s population lived outside of major urban areas. The country is covered with deciduous and coniferous forests, glacial lakes, and rivers. Many of the forests have been cut down, but until the mid-twentieth century, people living outside of major cities were very isolated, causing them to develop regional linguistic dialect

Identity and Gender in Traditional Jewish Dress

Eric K. Silverman

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Over the past few decades, North American Jews have increasingly contested and reshaped norms of Jewish gender and identity through ritual and everyday dress. Novel patterns on prayer shawls allow Jewish women to challenge long-standing male privilege during prayer and in the synagogue while nonetheless asserting a commitment to religious tradition and continuity. Skullcap or yarmulke designs increasingly draw on U.S. pop culture to uneasily balance Jewish religious particularity with cultural as

Accessories of Dress

Celia Stall-Meadows

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The accessories industries in Canada and the United States are multibillion dollar industries that include many diverse product categories. Fashion accessories may be defined as fashion items that are carried or worn, and support or accent apparel fashions. Common accessories used by consumers in North America include hats and headwear, eyewear, scarves, shawls, neckties, handkerchiefs, pocket squares, gloves, belts, handbags, small personal leather goods, luggage, umbrellas, fans, and watches. M

Scotland

Naomi E.A. Tarrant

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

By 1800, those people in Scotland who could afford it dressed in the style of clothing usually known as fashionable West European. This was no different from the dress of others of their class within Britain. There is no folk dress in Scotland, but there are some types of occupational dress that have been associated with Scotland or with particular types of work. Those who had little income for clothing dressed in what they could afford or were given by charities. As in former times, secondhand c

Spain

Silvia Ventosa

Translated by Lucy Lawton

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The influence of Spanish dress on European fashions is concentrated in two periods: the period of court life of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries with the moda a la española (Spanish-style fashion), and that of the majos, members of the Madrid artistic scene at the end of the eighteenth century and during the nineteenth century. The stereotypical image of the Spanish was fixed around 1800, an image that emanated from the south, from Andalusia, and this stereotype still survives in the early

Czech Ethnic Dress

Patricia Williams

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Czech Republic is a landlocked country in central Europe, which, in the twenty-first century, comprises the three historic provinces of Bohemia, Moravia, and Upper Silesia. The country is composed primarily of West Slavic people, but political and ethnographic borders have changed through centuries of prolonged conflict and domination by the German states and Austria. Social differentiation through clothing developed in Bohemia around the fourteenth century, and by the fifteenth century dress

Slovakia: Ethnic Dress

Patricia Williams

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Slovakia is a mountainous landlocked country in Central Europe, slightly larger than Switzerland. Slovaks have retained an enduring sense of their ethnicity, as manifested in the preservation of the Slovak language despite a turbulent history of foreign control and deprivation. They were under Hungarian and Austro-Hungarian rule from the tenth century until 1918, but, although their territory was called Upper Hungary, Slovaks never identified themselves as Hungarian, maintaining their Slovak iden

Religion and Dress

Nigel Yates, Dan Cohn-Sherbok and Dawoud El-Alami

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The wearing of special dress by all or some members of particular religions is commonplace throughout the world. In most cases, a distinction is made between the special dress worn by those officiating at religious services and that worn by those attending the services. In West Europe, the wearing of special dress within the different Christian churches—Eastern Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Protestant—has been largely confined to the clergy or to members of religious orders of monks and nuns, alt

The Management of Colour: The Kashmir Shawl in a Nineteenth-Century Debate

David Brett

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

Writing about colour has always been difficult because colour is notoriously resistant to language. The inter-translatability of colour names and terms between languages is remarkably diffuse, which is a sure sign of their odd logical status. Even where we might expect coherent theory, in the art of painting, discourse on colour was generally defined (negatively) as against disegno, drawing as form and composition. This was true until the mid-nineteenth century, and remains influential. There is

Consuming Kashmir: Shawls and Empires, 1500–2000

Michelle Maskiell

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

Kashmiri shawls and shawl cloth were well-known exports within Asia and moved through established trade networks linking international areas of demand long before the shawls became European commodities. From the sixteenth through the eighteenth century, Kashmiri artisans wove cloth from Central Asian goat fleece, silk, and other materials. Dealers brought unprocessed goat hair to Kashmir from the city of Leh in Ladakh (see Map 1), the long-established entrêpot between Kashmir and Central Asia.Lad

Slavic Wedding Customs on Two Continents

Patricia Williams

Source: Wedding Dress Across Cultures 2003

Book chapter

The Slavic people have three broad divisions: the eastern, the southern, and the western, primarily composed of Czechs (Bohemians and Moravians), Poles, and Slovaks. Problems often arise when discussing the Slavic people since ethnographic, historic and political boundaries do not always correspond, the result of centuries of prolonged political conflict and the domination of various powers in Eastern Europe. A basic similarity pervades the folk customs surrounding the use of dress and ritual amo

Protection From Harm: The Shawl and Cap in Czech and Slovak Wedding, Birthing and Funerary Rites

Patricia Williams

Source: Folk Dress in Europe and Anatolia. Beliefs about Protection and Fertility 1999

Book chapter

Archaeological finds suggest that ritual acts accompanied burial since early times. The presence of ritual attracted the attention of scholars, and in 1908 Arnold van Gennep presented the first substantial interpretation of such acts. Van Gennep (1960 [1908]: 10) called these ceremonies rites of passage, and described them as the “magico-religious” aspects of crossing frontiers associated with life changes. According to van Gennep, the more technically simple the society, the more often the holy

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 18 of 18 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1