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Accessories

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: The Dynamics of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Footwear has always had a place in history and literature. From childhood, we read about gallant heroes in seven-league boots, princesses in glass slippers, Mercury with winged feet, and, of course, the magic ruby slippers that took Dorothy from the Land of Oz back home to Kansas.

Fashion and Feminism

Henriette Dahan-Kalev and Shoshana-Rose Marzel

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

civil rightsgenderDuring the French Revolution, dress became an important issue: one of the ways in which revolutionaries’ values were to be obtained and symbolized was through the adoption of class-less styles of clothing, which expressed the ideals of Fraternity, Liberty, and Equality.

Accessories

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A hat is the accessory worn on top of the head. A hat may fit the head, be pulled down over the eyes, or almost look as if it were just sitting on the top.

Accessories

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: In Fashion, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The manufacturers of accessories must constantly forecast the changes in cycles of fashion so that their accessories are perfect for new fashions. This includes not only the changes in silhouette but also fabrications and color. The marketing of accessories gained an enormous boost with the entrance of well-known designers’ names into the business. Today, the fame of the accessories designer is as important as the fame of the clothing designer; in many cases, it is the same famous name.

Talitha Getty

Osman Ahmed

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Talitha Dina Pol (1940–1971) was born in Bali. After moving to London in 1945, following a traumatic period spent with her birth mother in a Japanese POW camp, Talitha studied at Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts with hopes of becoming an actress. Young, beautiful, and exotic, she was courted and celebrated by London society, becoming the second wife of John Paul Getty Jnr., the son of oil tycoon Paul Getty, in 1966. She wore an all-white, mink-trimmed, hooded minidress that echoed the height of Swi

Hermès

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Carmen Miranda

Fiona Corbridge

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Carmen Miranda was born in Portugal but grew up in Rio de Janeiro and considered herself a Brazilian. Her love of singing led to a career as a musical star in Brazil, going on conquer the US in 1939. Her cheery, colorful persona wiggled through a succession of Hollywood movies in extraordinary costumes that celebrated the color and passion of Brazil and its music, accented with Carmen’s trademark headpieces. Her influence on fashion in her lifetime was strong, with ranges of clothing, jewelry, sh

Islamic Style

Magdalena Crăciun

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Fashion designers have found inspiration in past and present sartorial repertoires. Islamically appropriate forms of covered dress have aesthetically been drawn upon as well. Consequently, headscarves, face veils and head-to-toe outerwear have occasionally appeared on the catwalk. Fashion commentators have pointed out that such creations and assemblages referenced ethic, traditional, historical, exotic or oriental dress, and only rarely labelled their source of inspiration as Islamic style. The n

Dai Rees

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Chanel Haute Couture, Karl Lagerfeld, Spring/Summer 1987

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Chanel’s spring/summer 1987 haute couture collection was shown in the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, where a student demonstration outside the venue required there to be tight security. On the stage, a fake statue of the Winged Victory was clothed in Chanel and holding a quilted bag. Critics derided the bustle-inspired “parabola” line and peplum hems that “obscured the real fashion originality” and “made the models look a bit like roosters.” Despite the criticism, the empire

Hervé Léger

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Philip Treacy

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Phillip Treacy, Spring/Summer 1999–2000

Victoria Rose Pass

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Milliner Phillip Treacy’s show for London’s spring/summer fashion week on 22 February 1999 played with anthropomorphic shapes that obscured the head and face. While a few designs had their basis in top hats, or fedoras, many more were based on entirely novel forms, from dinner plates to Alexander Calder mobiles. Models such as Grace Jones, Naomi Campbell, and Alek Wek walked with glittering makeup painted over one half of their face, obscuring recognizable features when the lights of the catwalk

The Directoire Period and the Empire Period 1790–1820

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The Directoire period (c. 1790–1800) includes the French Revolution and the establishment of the Directory (in French, Directoire), a government by a five-man executive body. The Empire period followed, coinciding generally with the period during which Napoleon Bonaparte was head of state in France. Indeed, the name of the period derives from the name of his era, the Napoleonic empire.

The Romantic Period 1820–1850

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In its emphasis on sentiment and feeling, Romanticism represented a reaction against the formal classical styles of the 17th and 18th centuries. Romantics rejected the classical insistence on rules governing creative work. Content was more important than form; rules could be broken. Romantic writers assumed that “empirical science and philosophy were inadequate as a means of answering all the most important questions concerning human life” (Harris, 1969, 19). Romantic artists appealed to the emot

The Crinoline Period 1850–1870

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The increasing width of women’s skirts had been leading to the use of multiple layers of stiffened petticoats. In September 1856 the editor of Peterson’s Magazine hailed the revival of the 18th-century hoopskirts as a means of holding out these voluminous skirts:

The Bustle Period and the Nineties 1870–1900

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By the time bustle skirts had become popular fashions, Queen Victoria had been ruler of Great Britain for just over 30 years and would remain Britain’s ruler for 30 years more. During the earlier years of Victoria’s reign, the British had come to share a common ideal with particular emphasis on the importance of morality and high standards of conduct.

The Twenties, Thirties, and World War II 1920–1947

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

With the end of World War I, Europe and the United States hoped for a return to normalcy. U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, a strong proponent of the League of Nations, campaigned arduously for ratification of the Treaty of Versailles and membership for the United States in the League. These efforts cost him his health—he suffered a breakdown in 1919—and he was an invalid for the remainder of his 17 months in office. In the end, the Senate defeated the treaty, and the United States never joined the

The New Look: Fashion Conformity Prevails

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

During the 1950s the world became a much smaller place. The rapid development of air travel, the almost instant transmission of news from one part of the world to another, and the transition from national to globally interdependent economies spread fashion and other information faster than ever before (Figure 17.1). It was no longer possible to understand the historical background of a period by examining developments only in western Europe and North America.

The Sixties and Seventies: Style Tribes Emerge 1960–1980

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The years that encompassed the Vietnam conflict were marked by social upheaval and turmoil in the United States. Opposition to the war among the young, continuing efforts to right the wrongs of segregation and racial discrimination, the rise of feminism, and the budding environmental movement all contributed to a period of tumult that was clearly reflected in the fashions of the period.

The Eighties and the Nineties: Fragmentation of Fashion 1980–1999

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

During the 1980s and 1990s, fashion choices were plentiful as a spirit of “anything goes” prevailed. Technology allowed the world to become increasingly connected.

The Romantic Period, 1820–1850

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Technical Design Terms for Silhouettes and Design Details

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

How to Measure, Size, and Grade

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Miss Headscarf: Islamic Fashion and the Danish Media

Connie Carøe Christiansen

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Whilst cultural commentators tended to downplay the aesthetic potential of the headscarf, contestants were generally more sensitive to its potential both as an item of fashion and self-cultivation. They were also conscious of the need to challenge perceptions of Muslim women through their appearance. In several of the Danish newspaper articles which featured the contest, young Muslim women in Denmark were given the opportunity to speak and to present another angle on the headscarf to that usually

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