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Quakers and Shakers

Beverly Gordon

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Anabaptists derive their name because the early practitioners of this branch of Protestantism sought to be rebaptized as adults although they had been baptized as children. There are four major Anabaptist groups: Hutterites, Mennonites, Brethren, and Amish, with subgroups within each category. Dress is an important means used by many Anabaptist groups to define their affiliation with a particular church, indicate their humility and willingness to submit to church discipline, and demonstrate their

Acadians

Jenna Tedrick Kuttruff

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Louisiana Acadians were originally French peasants who immigrated in the early 1600s to Acadie, the modern Canadian provinces of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, bringing their simple dress and methods of production with them to the New World. In 1755, Acadie was surrendered by the French to the English, who subsequently expelled all Acadians who would not submit to the English Crown. Following the ensuing exodus, Acadian exiles sought to preserve their cultural identity by seeking out isolated

Children’s Clothes

Viveka Berggren Torell

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The notion that children represent the future has influenced children’s dress for a long time. During the Enlightenment, childhood started to be seen as an important, separate period in a person’s life that ought to be devoted to a playful existence. At that time, philosophers advocated clothes allowing free movement of the body, to make it possible for children to develop according to their “inner path” and thereby become sensible adults. These ideas later reverberated in the twentieth century,

Variants of the Woman’s Cap in Slovak Ethnic Dress

Juraj Zajonc

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The woman’s cap—a close-fitting head covering that is part of female ethnic dress—has developed numerous variants in the territory of Slovakia. Women’s caps differ in form, cut, material, technique, decoration, and development. In the ethnic dress of the Slovaks, caps were worn by village inhabitants, especially those employed in agriculture and stock raising. Archival documents that describe the dress of the nobility and of city dwellers mention the cap as early as the thirteenth century. The cl

1913

Steven Zdatny (ed)

Source: Hairstyles and Fashion. A Hairdresser’s History of Paris, 1910–1920 1999

Book chapter

A renowned lady professor of music has just given in Paris her Grand Annual Soirée. In the programme, which was freely distributed, and even sent to hairdressers, there were the following items: Concert, musical interlude, ancient dances, and a public hairdressing competition; not one of those competitions at which the dressing is done in the hall, but a competition in the choice of coiffures recognised as the most attractive by a Committee of fashionable ladies and actresses.

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