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Accessories

Valerie Cumming

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

There is a debate about whether accessories are “essential” or “additional to dress.” From 1800 onwards, there are relatively few new accessories; some gradually disappeared, and others became increasingly important, their roles reflecting a changing world. Many times those actually producing these goods could themselves afford only basic, practical items. Certain crafts were more suited to mechanized production—knitted goods like stockings and printed fabrics—others, like millinery, beaded bags,

National Minorities in Xinjiang Province

Rahile Dawut

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region is located in northwest China, a vast area bordered by Mongolia, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, and Pakistan. Besides the Han Chinese, there are more than ten other ethnic groups, following several different religious traditions, in Xinjiang. Among them are Uighurs, Kazakhs, Kyrgyz, Uzbeks, Tartars, Tajiks, and Hui, all of whom follow various Islamic traditions. The historical Silk Road, which ran through present-day Xinjiang, linked the Far East, Central Asia, western

Children’s Clothes

Viveka Berggren Torell

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The notion that children represent the future has influenced children’s dress for a long time. During the Enlightenment, childhood started to be seen as an important, separate period in a person’s life that ought to be devoted to a playful existence. At that time, philosophers advocated clothes allowing free movement of the body, to make it possible for children to develop according to their “inner path” and thereby become sensible adults. These ideas later reverberated in the twentieth century,

Czech Ethnic Dress

Patricia Williams

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Czech Republic is a landlocked country in central Europe, which, in the twenty-first century, comprises the three historic provinces of Bohemia, Moravia, and Upper Silesia. The country is composed primarily of West Slavic people, but political and ethnographic borders have changed through centuries of prolonged conflict and domination by the German states and Austria. Social differentiation through clothing developed in Bohemia around the fourteenth century, and by the fifteenth century dress

Variants of the Woman’s Cap in Slovak Ethnic Dress

Juraj Zajonc

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The woman’s cap—a close-fitting head covering that is part of female ethnic dress—has developed numerous variants in the territory of Slovakia. Women’s caps differ in form, cut, material, technique, decoration, and development. In the ethnic dress of the Slovaks, caps were worn by village inhabitants, especially those employed in agriculture and stock raising. Archival documents that describe the dress of the nobility and of city dwellers mention the cap as early as the thirteenth century. The cl

Slavic Wedding Customs on Two Continents

Patricia Williams

Source: Wedding Dress Across Cultures 2003

Book chapter

The Slavic people have three broad divisions: the eastern, the southern, and the western, primarily composed of Czechs (Bohemians and Moravians), Poles, and Slovaks. Problems often arise when discussing the Slavic people since ethnographic, historic and political boundaries do not always correspond, the result of centuries of prolonged political conflict and the domination of various powers in Eastern Europe. A basic similarity pervades the folk customs surrounding the use of dress and ritual amo

Liberty Caps: from Roman Emblem to Radical Headgear

Richard Wrigley

Source: The Politics of Appearances. Representations Of Dress In Revolutionary France 2002

Book chapter

Historians writing about liberty caps in the Revolution use any one of three terms: bonnet de la liberté, bonnet rouge, and bonnet phrygien, the last two often being combined. Although they have commonly been employed as if they were interchangeable, it can be shown very easily that these three terms are by no means synonymous. Different usage corresponds to the particular circumstances that obtained at different moments of the revolutionary history of the liberty cap. Much of the confusion of te

Protection From Harm: The Shawl and Cap in Czech and Slovak Wedding, Birthing and Funerary Rites

Patricia Williams

Source: Folk Dress in Europe and Anatolia. Beliefs about Protection and Fertility 1999

Book chapter

Archaeological finds suggest that ritual acts accompanied burial since early times. The presence of ritual attracted the attention of scholars, and in 1908 Arnold van Gennep presented the first substantial interpretation of such acts. Van Gennep (1960 [1908]: 10) called these ceremonies rites of passage, and described them as the “magico-religious” aspects of crossing frontiers associated with life changes. According to van Gennep, the more technically simple the society, the more often the holy

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