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Carmen Miranda

Fiona Corbridge

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Carmen Miranda was born in Portugal but grew up in Rio de Janeiro and considered herself a Brazilian. Her love of singing led to a career as a musical star in Brazil, going on conquer the US in 1939. Her cheery, colorful persona wiggled through a succession of Hollywood movies in extraordinary costumes that celebrated the color and passion of Brazil and its music, accented with Carmen’s trademark headpieces. Her influence on fashion in her lifetime was strong, with ranges of clothing, jewelry, sh

The Turban: India and Pakistan

Vandana Bhandari

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Since ancient times the turban has constituted an important part of male dress on the Indian Subcontinent. Its basic form is a wrapped headdress made from a length of fabric that is coiled or pleated and wound around the head. The type of fabric, its dimensions, color, ornament, and style of wrapping may vary, but the essential concept, purpose, and mode of construction remain the same throughout the different regions where it is worn. The turban was known by several Sanskrit names in antiquity—u

Turban

Vandana Bhandari

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Explore
The Turban and Male Headgear

Beverly Chico

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The turban is a widely used headdress created by winding a piece of cloth, such as linen, cotton, or silk, around the head and sometimes over a cap. Turbans vary greatly in shape, size, folds, and color; the fabric used differs in its length and width. Assigned numerous meanings, turbans have represented religious symbolism, political power, social status, and fashion consciousness. They can also fulfill practical functions, such as providing protection against natural elements like heat, cold, w

Accessories

Valerie Cumming

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

There is a debate about whether accessories are “essential” or “additional to dress.” From 1800 onwards, there are relatively few new accessories; some gradually disappeared, and others became increasingly important, their roles reflecting a changing world. Many times those actually producing these goods could themselves afford only basic, practical items. Certain crafts were more suited to mechanized production—knitted goods like stockings and printed fabrics—others, like millinery, beaded bags,

Iranian Headwear in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries

Mary H. Farahnakian

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

From a Western perspective, exotic Iranian headwear of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries has been largely unknown to people around the world because of the lack of scholarly research on the topic. Additionally, few comparisons of Iranian headwear with that of other countries, particularly those in the Middle East, have been published. Where did the distinctive Iranian headwear originate? What influenced its development? Who developed its unique and divergent styles? This article addresses

Dress of Shiites and Mystics

Ashgar Seyed-Gohrab

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Shiites form the second-largest community of Muslims, who believe that the Prophet Mohammad’s cousin and son-in-law Ali ibn Abu Talib was his rightful successor. The Shiites do not accept the leadership of the first three caliphs, Abu Bakr, Omar, and Othman, emphasizing that they usurped Ali’s right. Islamic mystics and the Shiite clerics wear certain types of dress that distinguish them from other classes in Islamic societies. The dress of a Shiite cleric in contemporary Iran comprises a tur

Dress from Kyrgyzstan

Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Kyrgyz Republic, or Kyrgyzstan as it is more commonly known, is a country in Central Asia. The name Kyrgyz is said to mean either “forty girls” or “forty tribes” and is a name that probably refers to the epic hero Manas, who unified forty tribes against the Mongols in the medieval period. Kyrgyzstan is a landlocked and mountainous country which has borders with Kazakhstan to the north, Uzbekistan to the west, Tajikistan to the southwest, and China to the east. Since many ethnic groups in the

Nineteenth-Century Afro-Brazilian Women’s Dress

Kelly Mohs Gage

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The wealth originating from Brazil for the Portuguese Crown was generated by thousands of enslaved African plantation workers. At the dawning of the nineteenth century, there was a considerable African population in Brazil. The dress of both enslaved and freed Afro-Brazilians was linked to their African past while also incorporating European and Brazilian elements. However, African dress elements are not indicators of freedom or slavery, as there were many free Africans in Brazil. African women’s

1910

Steven Zdatny (ed)

Source: Hairstyles and Fashion. A Hairdresser’s History of Paris, 1910–1920 1999

Book chapter

It will, I imagine, be generally conceded that Marcel waving constitutes for the ladies’ hairdresser a great Trade improvement – an excellent means of enhancing the appearance of the human hair and of the feminine headdress. From the point of view of the public, Marcel waving is indisputably an important element in the ladies’ toilet. Consequently, it will not – it cannot – disappear. But its great popularity, which was described, and not without reason, as bordering almost on a craze, undoubtedl

Crowning the Person

Helen Bradley Foster

Source: “New Raiments of Self”. African American Clothing in the Antebellum South 1997

Book chapter

‘Ogea, please get my head-tie, I am going out now’ (Flora Nwapa, Nigeria, 1978:176).

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