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South Asian Footwear: History, Tradition, and Contemporary Trends

Jutta Jain-Neubauer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

It was, and still is, a common practice to walk barefoot in rural India, a frequent form of adornment being anklets. Traditionally, shoes were worn for protection against severe climatic or topographic conditions. That the aristocracy may have developed a taste for footwear in the early centuries c.e. is evident from sculptural representations. It is conceivable that the various styles of footwear evolved through a fusion of indigenous traditions with Greco-Roman and Kushan influences. The use of

Footwear

Doran H. Ross

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In discussions of dress in Africa, soled footwear is generally considered only as an afterthought, and the barefoot stereotype still pervades popular thinking about Africa. Feet, however, are conceptually dressed and framed in many of the same ways as hands and head. And much like the adornment of other parts of the body in Africa, elaborate forms of footwear were and are generally reserved for wealthier segments of society, although distinctions based on gender, age, vocation, and religion are a

Footwear

Elizabeth Semmelhack

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Traditional footwear in Asia is diverse and reflects historical and cultural developments across this vast region. While most footwear has its origins in the particulars of daily life, such as the rigid-soled boots for northern horse riders using stirrups or rough plaited straw sandals that gave farmers extra traction on wet or slippery surfaces, throughout most societies, decisions about wearing or not wearing footwear, or when to wear it, were determined by other factors, including custom, soci

Footwear in Australia

Lindie Ward

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Warm to hot summers, and preferences for the outdoor life, sport, and leisure have created a unique environment for the evolution of specific footwear made and used in Australia. Early Aborigines in the south Kimberley region wore shoes of felted emu feathers, yet going barefoot has been common at times for all Australians, although less so today. There was significant early demand for shoes for convicts and free settlers, which local tradespeople could not meet. As more affluent settlers arrived

Book chapter

In a nation involved in a constant struggle for its very existence, the topic of sandals recently stirred up quite a public debate. The ethics committee of the Israeli parliament, the Knesset, submitted a draft for a dress code, with special emphasis on footwear. A ban on wearing sandals in the Knesset chamber became an explosive issue. It was especially irritating for two members, who both wear sandals year-round for personal reasons, and as a recognizable sign of their ideological and political

Book chapter

Only one biblical text deals with the halitzah ritual explicitly, namely the already mentioned Deuteronomy 25:5–10: (Author’s translation)(5) If brothers dwell together, and one of them dies, and he does not have a child [or: son, ben], the wife of the deceased shall not be married outside [the family] to a stranger [le’ish sar]. Her brother-in-law shall come upon her and take her as his wife and perform the duty of the brother-in-law. (6) And the first-born that she gives birth to shall be insta

Book chapter

I was nurtured in a footwear environment. Shoes were in my genes. Dad was in the shoe fabric business in Boston. The shoe business in itself formed a Jewish community. Instead of leather, fabric substituted for lining in women’s shoes. Then it became fashionable for fabric to be used as the outer shell. Later, Dad introduced Lucite. It was a hot item. When he came home from work, he was usually carrying boxes of sample shoes to show the family and for me to try on. Fortunately they were my size.

Ixcacles: Maguey-fiber Sandals in Modern Mexico

Pamela Scheinman

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Ixcacles consist of four elements made in a specific order: 1) a foot-shaped sole (la suela ) of three layers of fiber, rolled and doubled over, then stitched tightly in a concentric or horizontal pattern; 2) a rectangular heel guard ( el carcañal or la talonera ), like the back of a shoe, of weft-faced plain weave; 3) a toe band (el puente ) woven over three (or up to ten) warps;Oaxacan sandals had a plied cord loop as a toe thong (la correa or la pata del gallo, i.e, rooster’s claw (see de Avil

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