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Red or Dead

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Greasers

Else Skjold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

“Greasers” were devotees of a subcultural style originally for young, working-class men (later also women) that emerged in the 1950s in the United States. The word “grease” refers to the wax or pomade used to make the characteristic hairdo of the look, which also typically included biker boots, jeans, T-shirts, and leather jackets. Groupings of greasers would often appear in motorcycle gangs around the emerging rock ’n’ roll scene, and parts of the subculture formed the motorcycle club “Hell’s An

Punk

Monica Sklar

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Punk is one of the most influential and highly visible of modern subcultures around the globe. While maintaining its original cachet with subcultural wearers, the aesthetic is also seen on high-fashion runways, in mainstream mall stores, and in every ideation imaginable on the street. Many elements of punk dress, such as combat boots, studded belts, and vibrantly dyed hair, have become iconic in popular culture, yet symbolism and meanings have changed over time. Today’s punk dress is primarily ro

Mugler

Laura Snelgrove

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Greenland

Cunera Buijs

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The extremes of the Arctic climate set Greenland dress apart from dress in the rest of West Europe. It is made from the skins and furs of animals and birds and is highly adapted to the conditions and lifestyle of the Arctic people. Even so there are distinctive regional dress cultures of the West Greenlanders (Kilaamiut), Northwest Greenlanders (Inughuit), and East Greenlanders (Tunumiit). It was only in the twentieth century that the dress of Greenlanders began to be influenced by dress in the r

Equestrian Costume

Alison Matthews David

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The materials worn for riding from the mid-seventeenth to the early twentieth centuries were easily distinguished from the silks, muslins, and velvets of fashionable evening dress. Equestrian activities required sturdy and often weatherproof fabrics such as woolen broadcloth, camlet (a silk and wool or hair mixture), melton wool, and gabardine for colder weather and linen or cotton twill for summer or the tropics. In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, habits were frequently adorned wi

South Asian Footwear: History, Tradition, and Contemporary Trends

Jutta Jain-Neubauer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

It was, and still is, a common practice to walk barefoot in rural India, a frequent form of adornment being anklets. Traditionally, shoes were worn for protection against severe climatic or topographic conditions. That the aristocracy may have developed a taste for footwear in the early centuries c.e. is evident from sculptural representations. It is conceivable that the various styles of footwear evolved through a fusion of indigenous traditions with Greco-Roman and Kushan influences. The use of

Footwear

Giorgio Riello

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The importance of shoes in twenty-first-century Western society extends well beyond their functional use. Through their material appearance—their texture, weight, and design—shoes express abstract ideas that range from sexual appeal to allure, smartness, and informality. Shoes, therefore, are not just accessories that decorate the body or allow people to embrace the latest fashion; they convey messages that are understood across society. High heels stand for exaggerated femininity; red shoes for

Footwear

Doran H. Ross

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In discussions of dress in Africa, soled footwear is generally considered only as an afterthought, and the barefoot stereotype still pervades popular thinking about Africa. Feet, however, are conceptually dressed and framed in many of the same ways as hands and head. And much like the adornment of other parts of the body in Africa, elaborate forms of footwear were and are generally reserved for wealthier segments of society, although distinctions based on gender, age, vocation, and religion are a

Boots

Clare Sauro

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Explore
Footwear

Elizabeth Semmelhack

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Traditional footwear in Asia is diverse and reflects historical and cultural developments across this vast region. While most footwear has its origins in the particulars of daily life, such as the rigid-soled boots for northern horse riders using stirrups or rough plaited straw sandals that gave farmers extra traction on wet or slippery surfaces, throughout most societies, decisions about wearing or not wearing footwear, or when to wear it, were determined by other factors, including custom, soci

Footwear in Australia

Lindie Ward

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Warm to hot summers, and preferences for the outdoor life, sport, and leisure have created a unique environment for the evolution of specific footwear made and used in Australia. Early Aborigines in the south Kimberley region wore shoes of felted emu feathers, yet going barefoot has been common at times for all Australians, although less so today. There was significant early demand for shoes for convicts and free settlers, which local tradespeople could not meet. As more affluent settlers arrived

Western Wear

Laurel Wilson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

North American Western style is known by some familiar materials and details, including embossed or fringed leather, silver conchos used to prevent leather ties from pulling through leather garments, and patterns woven in bright earth tones or primary colors. These materials and patterns did not rise spontaneously but developed over a five hundred–year period. The history of Western style began in Salamanca, Spain; picked up influences from non-Western frontiersmen such as Davy Crockett and Danie

Gaucho Dress

Moira F. Harris

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The Spanish introduced the horse and horned cattle to the New World, and the first horsemen of North and South America were the indigenous residents of the Pampas and plains. Later, the emigrants who dealt with these animals, from the southern gaucho to the northern cowboy, came to symbolize the region by their lifestyle and their dress. The earliest gauchos dealt in contraband hides and tallow, and were considered as vagabonds. Then, in the nineteenth century, they became soldiers in the wars fo

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