Results: Text (5) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 5 of 5 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Kilt

Andrew Bolton

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The kilt as we know it today originated in the first quarter of the eighteenth century. Known to the Gaelic-speaking Highlander as the “little wrap” (feileadh beag), it evolved from the “big wrap” (feileadh mor), or belted plaid, the first identifiably “Scottish” costume that emerged in the late sixteenth century. Earlier, the Scottish Gaels had worn the same clothes as their Irish counterparts, namely a shirt known in Gaelic as the léine and a semicircular mantle known in Gaelic as the brat.

Ethnic (Folk) Dress in West Europe

Helen Bradley Foster

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

European nations embrace common notions about folk dress as a symbol of cultural identity. The exception is England, a country not credited with a tradition of folk dress. Although the populations of many countries on other continents likewise recognize their own traditions of national dress, none uses the term folk to define that dress. The term and the manner in which its meaning changes over time and place help locate historical ideas about West European ethnic (folk) dress within temporal and

Wool

Ingun Grimstad Klepp

Translated by Stig Erik Sørheim

Kjetil Enstad

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Wool is probably the first fiber humans used, and throughout history it has been not only the most utilized fiber but also a commodity of great economic significance. In the twenty-first century, wool plays a more modest role and is primarily associated with quality and tradition.

Scotland

Naomi E.A. Tarrant

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

By 1800, those people in Scotland who could afford it dressed in the style of clothing usually known as fashionable West European. This was no different from the dress of others of their class within Britain. There is no folk dress in Scotland, but there are some types of occupational dress that have been associated with Scotland or with particular types of work. Those who had little income for clothing dressed in what they could afford or were given by charities. As in former times, secondhand c

‘Freezing the Frame’: Dress and Ethnicity in Brittany and Gaelic Scotland

Malcolm Chapman

Source: Dress and Ethnicity. Change Across Space and Time 1995

Book chapter

The “traditional dress” of Highland Scotland, in this sense, is a collection of clothing for men: its essential item is the tartan kilt, with the addition of items such as knee-length woolen socks, sgiandu, and sporran. This set of garments has never been the popular dress of anyone, outside the Scottish Highland regiments of the British army, and outside self-consciously folkloric circles (dancing groups, choirs, the “White Heather Club”, and so on). The central item, however, the kilt, does ech

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 5 of 5 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1