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Maurizio Baldassari

Katy Conover

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Kansai Yamamoto

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Bella Freud

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Chanel Haute Couture, Karl Lagerfeld, Spring/Summer 1987

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Chanel’s spring/summer 1987 haute couture collection was shown in the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, where a student demonstration outside the venue required there to be tight security. On the stage, a fake statue of the Winged Victory was clothed in Chanel and holding a quilted bag. Critics derided the bustle-inspired “parabola” line and peplum hems that “obscured the real fashion originality” and “made the models look a bit like roosters.” Despite the criticism, the empire

Guy Laroche

Matina Kousidi

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Tomasz Starzewski

Nanna Marie Lund

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Jazz Style on the Catwalk, 1970s–2000s

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

From 1970 to 2000, the influence of jazz culture on the women’s catwalk is pinpointed by the confluence of masculine and feminine details. Designers, during the three decades, interpreted the tuxedo and double-breasted suit that were standardized uniforms of early jazz musicians. Particularly for African American performers, these formal garments bolstered access to mainstream culture, social and economic equality, celebrity, and musical distinction. These utilities are paramount to its exhibitio

Mark Eisen

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Hanae Mori

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Harriet Selling

Tory Turk

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Fashions for a Phoney War

Geraldine Howell

Source: Wartime Fashion. From Haute Couture to Homemade, 1939–1945 2012

Book chapter

White Suited Men: Style, Masculinity and the Boyband

Janice Miller

Source: Fashion and Music 2011

Book chapter

Women are traditionally seen to be subject to the power systems of men—passive, whilst men are active; private, while men are public; ‘fashionable [when] men are not’ (Craik 1994: 170). Clearly, then, both genders have been subjected to expected ways of being and modes of behaviour which are undoubtedly different, but equally limiting. The expectations of appropriate gender behaviour may change over time. Yet when such change happens, what is never eradicated is a sense of a clearly demarcated, i

Tweed

Fiona Anderson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Tweed cloth originated in Scotland in the early nineteenth century. At that time, it was only made from woolen yarns in the twill weave. From the 1820s to the present, tweed has been characterized by a huge range of color and weave effects. The main account given for the origins of the name tweed is that it is based on a misreading of the Scottish word tweel or twill (which was the weave characteristic of Scottish woolens at that time) for tweed. By the 1840s, tweed was established as a term used

Conventional Work Dress and Casual Work Dress

Colleen Gau

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Clothing of men and women who lived and worked in the United States and Canada since the beginning of the nineteenth century through the start of the twenty-first century has presented a microcosm of societies’ changes. Agriculture was the primary means of livelihood at the outset and continues to play a role for a small portion of the population. Rag pickers, rug weavers, and quilters wore and reused fabrics; therefore, not many examples of work dress have survived. Early sewing machines of Germ

Political Candidates and Dress

Susan B. Kaiser and Janet Hethorn

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In electoral politics, candidates face delicate balancing acts in matters of dress. They must represent (and therefore fit in with) the people they seek to serve; yet they also need to establish themselves as leaders who stand out/above. It helps to look good and dress well, but not to the extent that potential voters suspect the politician has little substance (and “only style”). Further considerations include the need not to appear too vain or self-absorbed. The ways in which political candidat

Fashion Variations

Susan Kaiser and Ryan Looysen

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

For the last fifty years or so, a central debate in fashion studies has centered around the influence of minority, subcultural, and street styles on high and mainstream fashion. Are these styles outside the realm of fashion? Or is fashion a process of complex negotiation that includes such styles, providing fashion variations for different groups? Among the names assigned to these styles are antifashion, oppositional style, and alternative style. However, these terms all require an opposite again

Urban Menswear in Australia

Vicki Karaminas

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Australia was relatively sparsely populated with Europeans until the discovery of gold in 1851. Immigration, together with increased urbanization and industrialization, led to growing prosperity for its colonies. A new class of professional city men, civil servants and entrepreneurs, emerged. While the governing class had always looked to Britain for their styles of fashionable dress, men abandoned the diversity of everyday town dress in the early colonies and began to conform to European standar

Class, Work, and Dress

Alexandra Kim

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

During the nineteenth century, clothing in West Europe was inextricably linked to a person’s class and occupation. Dress was constantly used to determine a person’s social status. Although there were obvious variations in occupational dress across the Continent, a worker’s clothing—whether in the countryside or the city—would have clearly indicated his or her place in the social hierarchy. Changing work patterns, a growing informality, and the fragmentation of the class structure in the twentieth

Wool

Ingun Grimstad Klepp

Translated by Stig Erik Sørheim

Kjetil Enstad

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Wool is probably the first fiber humans used, and throughout history it has been not only the most utilized fiber but also a commodity of great economic significance. In the twenty-first century, wool plays a more modest role and is primarily associated with quality and tradition.

Chinese Dress in Singapore

Chor Lin Lee

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Singapore developed into a multicultural pluralistic society by the second half of the nineteenth century, so it would be hard to imagine the Chinese community there to be homogeneous. Two distinctive Chinese communities could be identified, depending on their levels of familiarity with Singapore and hence Southeast Asia and the length of their association there—the Peranakan (native-born, or Straits Chinese) and the sinkeh (newcomers). The way women from these Chinese communities dressed was ill

Gender

Gertrud Lehnert

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The basic distinction between female and male dress in the Western world is between women’s skirts and men’s bifurcated trousers. Only in the twentieth century was this abandoned—but in one direction, since, even today, men do not wear skirts, despite some attempts by fashion designers. This does not indicate that trousers are more natural for men, but that in the West, they denote supremacy and masculinity. From the late Middle Ages onwards, increasing emphasis was put on gender differentiation

Competitive Ballroom Dance

Jonathan S. Marion

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Competitive ballroom costuming facilitates and maximizes the artistic and expressive impact of competitors’ dancing. It is meant to accentuate the movements of dancers’ performances and enhance the artistic images being produced. Artistic costume on the one hand, ballroom dress serves simultaneously as functional athletic wear that must stand up to the physical rigors and stresses involved in the tremendous movement and motion competitors produce. Balancing art and athletics, and in line with spe

Fashion and Jazz

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion and jazz are expressive forms of art and have significantly influenced one another in the first half of the twentieth century. The merger of alluring fashion and impassioned jazz configured mutually beneficial relationships, where aesthetics imparting identity and showmanship were put forth. Creative output, an aspiration of each discipline, was achieved through the exploration of textiles and construction in fashion, and the improvisation of melody and harmony in jazz. With American orig

The Structure and Form of European Clothes

Peter McNeil

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Clothing is both a material covering and an enclosure for the body that in West Europe is generally constructed through draping or cutting cloth or through weaving or knitting it to shape. The structure of European dress is also bound up with abstract ideals of conduct and beauty. The aesthetic and phenomenological dimension of clothing moving in space is also significant. Some fashions such as women’s court dress from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were designed to be “read” from a fro

Antifashion in East Asian Dress: Power of Uniforms

Brian J. McVeigh

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion in East Asia reveals historical trajectories following the same path as Euro–American modernities. Modernization underpins the fashion-oriented consumerism visible today in Japan, China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, accounting for the interplay between fashion, counter-fashion, and antifashion. Counter-fashion is concerned with an interest in change and avant-garde styles. It may be associated with dissent, protest, or ridicule. Antifashion (commonly confused with counter-fashion) means styles

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