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Flammability testing and issues specific to children’s products

Deanna Clark-Esposito

Source: A Practical Guide to Fashion Law and Compliance, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The law as a means to prevent flammable wearing apparel dates back to 1953 when the Flammable Fabrics ActFlammable Fabrics Act (FFA) was enacted. This law, together with its rules and regulations, provides the framework within which this prevention effort continues today and is commonly referred to as the Flammability Standard, theFlammability Standard.See, Standard for the Flammability of Textiles (16 CFR Part 1610). Its purpose is twofold. The first is to prevent individuals from wearing clothi

Innerwear, Bodywear, Legwear

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: The Dynamics of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In the past, the manufacturing and marketing of men's and children's underwear was driven by considerations of practical functionality, but lately, these segments of the apparel industry have also felt the impact of fashion. Through mergers and acquisitions, producers of men's and children's underwear have become divisions of more diversified apparel firms. This trend is discussed later in this chapter.

Lingerie

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Here are some common mistakes and what to do if they happen.

Controversial Catwalk: Comme des Garçons’ “Sleep” Collection, 1995

Barbara Brownie

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

In 1995, Comme des Garçons provoked controversy with a collection featuring distressed fabric that bore faded boot prints, along with loose-fitting loungewear of blue-and-white striped cotton. Although Rei Kawakubo herself denied any intentional reference to the Holocaust, audiences saw the boot prints as references to bodies trampled underfoot, the vertically striped pajamas as imitations of those worn by concentration camp inmates. Large, “meaningless” numbers, printed onto hems, seemed to invi

Issey Miyake, Fall/Winter 1984

Veronica Maldonado

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Issey Miyake’s fall/winter 1984 collection cemented his status as the top Japanese-born designer presenting during Paris Fashion Week. The collection came during a time of rejection for most Japanese labels, as the market grew tired of the darkly colored and oversize designs commonly presented by the group of designers aesthetically led by Comme des Garçons’ Rei Kawakubo and Yohji Yamamoto, with complaints that the style remained stagnant and too predictable for the fashion consumer. Miyake sides

Oscar de la Renta, Spring/Summer 1995

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Oscar de la Renta’s spring/summer 1995 collection featured an array of sherbert candy shades and styles of dress, from halter, strapless, and bandeau minidresses to full, short-sleeve A-line versions, inspired by his mentor, Cristóbal Balenciaga. Shown at New York Fashion Week, the collection also included provocative, nightwear-inspired styles and even a wedding dress. While the mix of styles was eclectic, many of the designer’s praised signature traits were apparent, which converged to form an

Yohji Yamamoto, Spring/Summer 1993

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Yohji Yamamoto’s spring/summer 1993 collection was held at the construction site of the Marché des Blancs-Manteaux in Paris. As in previous seasons, Yamamoto engaged creative individuals who were not professional models to present his work. The collection was eclectic, with global inspirations, and had everything from motifs and graphic elements to checks and stripes.

Yohji Yamamoto, Spring/Summer 1994

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

For Yohji Yamamoto’s spring/summer 1994 collection, white makes an appearance in nearly every look—and these were created with layers, as the fashion designer continued working on redefining men’s wardrobes. Following the trends for the season, several versions of the classic white button-down shirt were presented, including longer versions akin to the Moroccan djellaba. Stripes were also seen on various items of clothing. The collection received mixed reviews from fashion critics.

Safety Regulations and Guidelines for Wearing Apparel

Janace E. Bubonia

Source: Apparel Quality. A Guide To Evaluating Sewn Products, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Toxicity is a safety hazard resulting from wearing some apparel products. Materials containing certain types of dyes, finishes, containments, or metals that come in contact with the wearer’s skin can cause mild to severe allergic reactions or dermatitis for those individuals with skin sensitivity and worse some substances have been found to be carcinogenic. Chemical substances are identified by CAS (Chemical Abstract Service) numbers, which are registration designations assigned to individual che

Invisible Clothing

Philippe Perrot

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2009, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Many maladies are caused by … corsets. Thin bodies, narrow shoulders. Out of four two are bones of some promise; one, bones which promise nothing; a fourth go to Nice with the consumption; another fourth will at twenty-six drag out six days of the seven in an invalid's chair.

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