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Jacket, Cardigan, Sweater, and Sweater-Jacket Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter, you develop slopers for jackets, cardigans, and sweater-jackets. They can be fitted, loose-fit, or oversized. You must use the appropriate slopers to suit the type of knit, style, and fit you envision for your design. Fitted and loose-fit cardigan muslins have been cut, stitched, and placed on the form in Figures 8.3 and 8.4. For the opening, a 1” extension is added to the center front.

Closures

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Maurizio Baldassari

Katy Conover

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Chanel Haute Couture, Karl Lagerfeld, Fall/Winter 1984

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Shown at the Palais Garnier in Paris, home of the national opera, this fashion show was the most lavish and over-the-top fashion event in Paris at the time and began Karl Lagerfeld’s tradition of showmanship and set design. As with Karl’s first Chanel collection, this collection was panned for its deviation from Chanel’s trademark of easy comfort, with the classic Chanel suit made in a fitted silhouette that outlined the derrière. But it was also praised by others for updating Chanel’s image from

Commercial Product Development and Production

Susan M. Watkins and Lucy E. Dunne

Source: Functional Clothing Design. From Sportswear to Spacesuits, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Even though most consumers tend to assume all garments are stitched together, many items of protective clothing cannot be stitched. They must be formed using a variety of types of heat sealing or molding processes because the holes left by the stitching reduce their effectiveness. When stitching is used to form protective clothing, there are additional considerations that need to be made to ensure that the particular stitch type, stitch length, thread, and other factors are appropriate for the ga

Garment Construction Details

Janace E. Bubonia

Source: Apparel Quality. A Guide To Evaluating Sewn Products, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

When it comes to purchasing apparel, consumers look for garments that are flattering on their figure. The way a garment fits is just as important as the styling of the design. Fit is the relationship between the body and the size and styling of a garment. A properly fitting garment should provide a smooth appearance that is free of wrinkling, bulging, or sagging and should effectively function for its intended use to provide comfort for the wearer. A poorly fitting garment can make any design und

Button and Buttonhole Placement Worksheet A (Shirt with Front Band and Mandarine Neck)

Julie Cole and Sharon Czachor

Source: Sample Workbook to Accompany Professional Sewing Techniques for Designers, 2nd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Button and Buttonhole Placement Worksheet B (Shirt with No Front Band or Collar)

Julie Cole and Sharon Czachor

Source: Sample Workbook to Accompany Professional Sewing Techniques for Designers, 2nd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Details

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Buttons, like snaps, hooks, and zippers, are mechanisms used to close garments. Buttons are often used as decorative elements, and their size and shape vary from round to rectangular, and lat to dimensional. Placement of buttons can vary according to design intent. They can also be a single button or double button.

Fasteners

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Closures

Jennifer Prendergast

Source: Sewing Techniques. An introduction to construction skills within the design process, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Buttons are one of the oldest closures, dating back to the Bronze Age. They were originally used as decorations; they were later used on clothing. They can be found in both natural and synthetic materials. Buttons can be finished in very decorative patterns or can be quite plain; vintage ones can be sourced if required and they are very simple to make. They come in a variety of shapes and sizes but as stated previously, if the intention is to make an impact, try to source these at the design stag

Draping Essentials

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The draper/designer's medium is fabric, which he or she manipulates with skillful hands in the creation of simple to complex designs. Draping has many attributes. Draping allows the draper/designer to evaluate the drape at each step to assure that line and balance are in harmony with the design. A misplaced style line can be easily changed for greater appeal. The draper/designer can manipulate the fabric, adding fullness for gathers, flares, or diagonal drapery until he or she is visually satisfi

Assembly and Finishing

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Apparel Production Management and the Technical Package, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Most people who sew at home know garment components as the trims: zippers, buttons, and so on. If you were to look at retail patterns for home sewing, you would see these items listed as components. However, in manufacturing, all parts of the garment are considered components—there is no distinction between body components and trim components. Later, when you learn about the technical package, there will be a fabric sheet and a component/trim sheet (which can be confusing), but on the sewing floo

Jewelry of Malaysia

Mohammed Kassim Bin Haji Ali

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Beads were one of the earliest forms of manufactured body ornaments worn by indigenous groups in Malaysia. Some beads found in Borneo can be dated to the Metal Age. Earlier glass and stone beads that came from as far away as Egypt and Mesopotamia through bartering have become very valuable and are much sought after in the early twenty-first century; in earlier times they were sometimes used as currency. The ancient tradition remains strong, and status and wealth are measured according to the numb

Design Details

Milva Fiorella Di Lorenzo

Source: Tailoring Techniques for Fashion, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After you have read this chapter, you should be able to discuss:

Closures, Facings, and Bands

Nora M. MacDonald

Source: Principles of Flat-Pattern Design, 4th Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Standard button and buttonhole closures require that extensions be added to the pattern piece. These extensions become the overlap and underlap for the buttonhole closure. The original pattern lines, to which extensions are added, meet each other when the garment is fastened. Button and buttonhole closures commonly are found at the center front of blouses, shirts, skirts, dresses, coats, and jackets; center back of blouses, skirts, and dresses; asymmetric closings, including double-breasted; and

History of the Graduation Button Blanket

Sandra Price

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Each spring when the First Nations Haida secondary school graduates receive their button blankets, they are part of a centuries-old tradition of learning their identity, and a new tradition that celebrates their academic achievements. Button blankets are a relatively recent art form of the Haida, who live on the forested archipelago of Haida Gwaii off the west coast of British Columbia. When the first European and American traders arrived on the islands in the late 1700s, the Haida readily exchan

Buttons

Melinda Watt

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The precursor to the button fastener was the fibula, a brooch or pin used to hold two pieces of clothing on the shoulder or chest. The button began to replace the fibula at least by the early Middle Ages, if not sooner.

Completing a Pattern

Catherine Black

Source: Modaris and Diamino for Apparel Design, 2008, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

F1>Points>Add Point adds a characteristic point or a curve point at a relative distance from a reference or point. Click on a point, and then move the cursor to a new position and click.

Pattern Grading

Catherine Black

Source: Modaris and Diamino for Apparel Design, 2008, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Computer pattern grading or pattern movement is based on the Cartesian graph concept (Moore, Mullet, and Young, 2001). The pattern piece orientation is the first decision that must be established. As shown in Figure 3.3, the point of reference is 0,0 (zero,zero), and the x- and y-coordinates of a grade rule for a point are based on the pattern orientation or the direction the pattern is positioned. Each grade point is found in one of four quadrants formed by the x- and y-axes. The procedure for c

Clip Art Library

Michele Wesen Bryant and Diane DeMers

Source: The Spec Manual, 2nd Edition, 2006, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Details

Injoo Kim and Mikyung Uh

Source: Apparel Making in Fashion Design, 2002, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Although the main function of the button is to fasten, it can be used as a decorative element as well. There are two basic types of buttons: sew-through and shank. A sew-through button has two or four holes for attachment to the garment, whereas a shank button has a shank attached to the underside. When stitching a sew-through button to the garment, it is necessary to make a thread shank at the base of the button that is 1/16″ long for thin fabric, and ⅛″ long for thick fabric.

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