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Construction

Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale

Source: The Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Before we can talk about the methods for constructing garments, we must first look at the array of tools and heavy-duty machinery involved in the process of construction. Listed below are some of the key tools.

Creating Texture with Pleats, Tucks, Gathers, Ruffles, and Trims

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A variety of knit and stretch woven fabrics used throughout the text have been cut into sample sizes to stitch these techniques. Purchase additional yardage as assigned by the instructor or spurred by curiosity of the designer, ¼ yard minimum. Elastic ⅛″ and ¼″, fusible interfacing, hand sewing thread and needles, and a loop turner are all supplies used in previous chapters. Other supplies will be listed with each technique.

The Skill of Fabric Manipulation

Zoya Nudelman

Source: The Art of Couture Sewing, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Appliqués are cutout fabric, lace, or cutwork shapes applied to the garment. They are attached on by hand, machine, or with heat.

Pleats and Tucks

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Shape/Volume

Lucy Adjoa Armah

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

To fully understand the significance of “volume” in fashion, it is necessary to discuss everything from the exaggerated shoulders in the trend for tailored power dressing in the 1980s to the unconventional draping and pleating of Issey Miyake. The prism of volume enables the unpacking of aesthetic traditions in dress and fashion that appear to have little in common. When designers utilize volume, they are often presenting a fantasy from a distant land or a reimagined time. When individuals choose

Valentino

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Véronique Branquinho

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Fabric Manipulation

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Appliqué is the process of attaching another fabric, or patch, called patchwork, or ribbon or trim, called passementerie, to the surface of another fabric.

Issey Miyake

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Garment Construction Details

Janace E. Bubonia

Source: Apparel Quality. A Guide To Evaluating Sewn Products, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

When it comes to purchasing apparel, consumers look for garments that are flattering on their figure. The way a garment fits is just as important as the styling of the design. Fit is the relationship between the body and the size and styling of a garment. A properly fitting garment should provide a smooth appearance that is free of wrinkling, bulging, or sagging and should effectively function for its intended use to provide comfort for the wearer. A poorly fitting garment can make any design und

Details

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Buttons, like snaps, hooks, and zippers, are mechanisms used to close garments. Buttons are often used as decorative elements, and their size and shape vary from round to rectangular, and lat to dimensional. Placement of buttons can vary according to design intent. They can also be a single button or double button.

Styles, Lines, and Details for Shape and Fit

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Manipulating Dart Excess and Adding Fullness

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The basic dart has creative value when draped as clusters, curved, asymmetric, or as intersecting darts, to name a few. The dart excess, when used creatively, is referred to as a dart equivalent. The following list includes by no means the only design possibilities:

Skirt

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The amount of deviation from the basic straight-line skirt determines the new silhouette. Four skirt prototypes are identified by their silhouettes and are the basis for an infinite number of designs; these include the straight, or rectangle; the A-line, or triangle; the peg, or inverted triangle; and the bell silhouettes.

Cowls

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Cowls can be draped with or without pleats/gathers and with few or many folds. Cowls can fall at varying depths, creating a soft look to any garment. Cowls are designed to fall from the shoulders, neckline, armholes, or waist of dresses, gowns, blouses, pants, jackets, and coats. With the help of a brooch or clip, the cowl can be pulled in any direction to create interesting design effects (see Design b in Figure 1).

Knitting and Pleating

Jie Li

Source: Fashion Thinking. Creative Approaches to the Design Process, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Students were asked to research two craft techniques. As a result of her research, Jie found pleating and hand knitting to interest her the most and consequently decided to combine the two techniques to create a new craft. Jie began her research in a linear way, visiting the library and browsing the Internet to gather images to give a broad overview of visual ideas.

Knitting and Pleating

Jie Li

Source: Fashion Thinking. Creative Approaches to the Design Process, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After the initial stage of investigating the craft, via research, materials and working on the form in 3D, Jie next had to make some decisions about what worked and what had not. Through her testing of the various shapes and pleat techniques, she had decided that the accordion worked best.

Knitting and Pleating

Jie Li

Source: Fashion Thinking. Creative Approaches to the Design Process, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Jie prefers to work on the form, developing silhouettes as she goes. In this case, she chose the knitted samples she liked best and draped these on the dress form or model. In the final stage, Jie used batting to create more volume and taught herself to knit via a YouTube video. She used gigantic needles to create a three-dimensional look.

Trousers

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting: The Architecture of Fashion. Required Reading Range Module Reader, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The idea that women were once ‘not allowed’ to wear trousers seems ridiculous now. Although women began to wear trousers early on in the twentieth century, it was really Yves Saint Laurent who made trousers chic and highly fashionable, along with his reworking of ‘the smoking jacket’. Trousers were the domain of male attire, as much as skirts were the domain of female attire. In particular, this gendering of clothing was somewhat erased when jeans were adopted by men and women alike. Jeans also e

Fashion Design Art with Illustrator® and Photoshop®

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter, you will add depth and definition to your digital fashion croquis. Several tutorials are devoted to creating and enhancing apparel on male and female fashion figures by combining the effects of both Illustrator® and Photoshop®. After completing each tutorial in this chapter, you will understand how to:

Technical Design with Illustrator®

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In the apparel market, nearly all digital production flats are created with vector-based software programs like Illustrator®. The need to communicate with global resources and the fast pace of the garment center have nearly eclipsed the use of freehand technical flats for production.

Bodice and Blouse Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 4th Edition, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The bodice and blouse designs in this group are kept simple and natural while the fabric is draped with the correct amount of ease and proportion. Projects explore how to release and manipulate the fabric into a design. Each design defines the style and silhouette over the bust, hip, and waist by emphasizing the use of folds, darts, pleats, fullness, empire seams, and halters, and at the same time, not overworking the fabric.

Issey Miyake

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo, 2011, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Clothes … speak many languages … and have to be seen on the outside … as well as felt on the inside.

Dart-Equivalent Bodice Styles

Sally M. Di Marco

Photography by Erika Yuille

Computer-Assisted Drawings and Draping by Katarina Kozarova

Source: Draping Basics, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Other variations of the foundation bodice can be created by converting the dart excess of the fitting darts to dart equivalents. The dart-equivalent bodice styles presented in this chapter— such as the gathered waist bodice, flange dart bodice, and the princess bodice— are accomplished by converting the dart excess to gathers, open-end darts, or shaped seamlines, without changing the fit of the pattern. The dart excess can also be draped as dart-equivalent tucks, flares, pleats, or fully released

Pleats and Tucks

Nora M. MacDonald

Source: Principles of Flat-Pattern Design, 4th Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Both pleats and tucks consist of an inner and an outer fold of fabric. Pleat or tuck depth is the distance between these folds. When designing a pleat or tuck, the depth must be doubled to produce the fabric return. Basic pleat types include the knife, inverted, and box. Pleats are categorized by the placement of fabric folds on the garment (Fig. 11.1).

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