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Designing with Circular Flounces and Ruffles

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesFlounces, circulargathered ruffles andRufflesFlounces, circularFlounces, circulardesignsDesigns with a circular flounce are the stuff of romance. Flounces recall a mood of elegance with a rich, dramatic, graceful flare.

Skirt Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesSkirt designsA skirt is a separate item of clothing starting above, below, or at the natural waistline. Skirt designs vary from basic tailor-made to extreme. The designer may change a skirt style by draping the design close to the body, or by draping in various fullness, gathers, flares, pleats, gores, or godets. The shape, the sweep of the skirt (the amount of width at the hemline), and the appearance at the hem length will depend upon the design, the customer,

Creating Texture with Pleats, Tucks, Gathers, Ruffles, and Trims

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A variety of knit and stretch woven fabrics used throughout the text have been cut into sample sizes to stitch these techniques. Purchase additional yardage as assigned by the instructor or spurred by curiosity of the designer, ¼ yard minimum. Elastic ⅛″ and ¼″, fusible interfacing, hand sewing thread and needles, and a loop turner are all supplies used in previous chapters. Other supplies will be listed with each technique.

The Skill of Fabric Manipulation

Zoya Nudelman

Source: The Art of Couture Sewing, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Appliqués are cutout fabric, lace, or cutwork shapes applied to the garment. They are attached on by hand, machine, or with heat.

The Skill of Hems and Other Edge Finishes

Zoya Nudelman

Source: The Art of Couture Sewing, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Hems are finished edges of a garment. (Figure 11.1) Without hems, garments can look incomplete and unprofessional. However, hems are not always necessary. Some fabrics don’t ravel and can be used for designs that purposely have a raw edge as a design element.

Bill Blass, Spring/Summer 1988

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

This collection was inspired by Matisse paintings that Bill Blass saw while at the National Gallery in Washington. Shown at the Parsons School of Design in New York, the clothes were short and full of froufrou due to the influence of “the sugar daddy of bonbon chic” and designer of the moment Christian Lacroix, and his short, little-girl styles. Hems were well above the knees, which concerned retailers servicing working women needing office-appropriate clothes. Even though critics liked his use o

Oscar de la Renta, Spring/Summer 1995

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Oscar de la Renta’s spring/summer 1995 collection featured an array of sherbert candy shades and styles of dress, from halter, strapless, and bandeau minidresses to full, short-sleeve A-line versions, inspired by his mentor, Cristóbal Balenciaga. Shown at New York Fashion Week, the collection also included provocative, nightwear-inspired styles and even a wedding dress. While the mix of styles was eclectic, many of the designer’s praised signature traits were apparent, which converged to form an

Ungaro, Fall/Winter 1987

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The major trend for fall/winter 1987 was short, skintight dresses and low necklines. Designers crafted garments that emphasized women’s bodies, and “Emanuel Ungaro in Paris, for example, presented the most blatant of sexy statements with panache, wit and skill,” according to journalist Carrie Donovan. Ruching, ruffles, and frills were prominent. High necklines abounded: Ungaro employed these as design features as he liked to emphasize the graceful shape of a woman’s neck.

Martine Sitbon

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Ruffle Dress

Laura Nugent

Source: Computerized Patternmaking for Apparel Production, 2008, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

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