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Hispanic and Latino American

Josephine M. Moreno

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The heritage of Latinos living in the United States and Canada is a mixture of Spanish, Portuguese, European, Native, African, Asian, and other ancestry. Dress needs vary widely and are influenced in part by socioeconomic status, age, income, education, immigration status, faith, popular culture, and gender. Family values and faith play a significant role in Hispanic families and influence dress purchases, particularly for special occasion wear. Latinos also tend to be brand-conscious. Although a

The Maya of Tecpán, Guatemala

Carol Hendrickson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

While much can be written about Guatemalan traje (Maya dress) in general, the Maya experience of dress should always be understood in the context of specific social conditions, historical frames, and cultural meanings. In the case of one municipality—TecpánGuatemala—it is useful to consider the issues that Tecpanecos (residents of Tecpán) experience, talk about, and act upon daily in relation to Maya dress. Late-twentieth-century and early-twenty-first-century fashion in Maya dress, notably the h

Zapotec Clothing in Oaxaca

Grace Johnson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The geographical setting of Oaxaca, except for narrow coastal strips, consists of mountainous zones with isolated peaks, broken by numerous deep canyons, valleys, and basins. The less rugged areas form the major concentrated settlement areas. The great variety of terrain, cultures, and languages make Oaxaca (a southern state of Mexico) one of the most complex regions in the country. In the past, the high mountains and difficulties of communication perpetuated the isolation of the people of Oaxaca

Maya Dress and Fashion in Chiapas

Ashley E. Maynard and Patricia Marks Greenfield

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

A transition has taken place in Maya communities in highland Chiapas, Mexico, from a few traditional, defined patterns for each article of clothing to the concept of fashion, with its traits of change and innovation. This transition to fashion occurred as the communities moved from a subsistence and agriculture economy to one based on money and commerce. A notable example is Nabenchauk, a hamlet in Zinacantán, where research has been conducted by cultural psychologist Patricia Greenfield since 19

The Huipil of Guatemala

J. Claire Odland

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

In the highlands of Guatemala, indigenous Maya women are well known for their beautiful traditional dress, called traje. Women’s traje consists of a huipil (blouse or tunic), corte (skirt), faja (sash), and may include a distinctive headdress, shawl, apron, and overblouse as well. The huipil, usually brocaded by hand on a backstrap loom, is a traditional garment that continues to be popular and has great social significance. Changes in huipil fashion reflect political, economic, and social change

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