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African American Dress

Helen Bradley Foster

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Head, Edith

Clare Sauro

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Jamaica in the Nineteenth Century to the Present

Steeve O. Buckridge

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The island of Jamaica is the third-largest nation in the Caribbean or the West Indies. The island has a population of 2.6 million people. The country’s capital, Kingston, lies at the foot of the Blue Mountains, with its highest peak reaching 7,402 feet (2,256 meters), making it the highest peak in the Caribbean. Jamaica gained its independence from Britain in 1962. However, it remains a member of the British Commonwealth and has a constitutional parliamentary democracy system with a prime ministe

Caribbean Headwear

Beverly Chico

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Since the sixteenth century, many types of headpieces have been worn by Caribbean islanders, depending on various factors including ethnicity, climate, and communal events. European colonizers usually brought and wore hats and styles from their respective countries. They generally became the ruling elite, their headwear communicating their status, and Creoles (descendants of European settlers) usually wore European styles. The headgear that arrived during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries

Nineteenth-Century Afro-Brazilian Women’s Dress

Kelly Mohs Gage

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The wealth originating from Brazil for the Portuguese Crown was generated by thousands of enslaved African plantation workers. At the dawning of the nineteenth century, there was a considerable African population in Brazil. The dress of both enslaved and freed Afro-Brazilians was linked to their African past while also incorporating European and Brazilian elements. However, African dress elements are not indicators of freedom or slavery, as there were many free Africans in Brazil. African women’s

Crowning the Person

Helen Bradley Foster

Source: “New Raiments of Self”. African American Clothing in the Antebellum South 1997

Book chapter

‘Ogea, please get my head-tie, I am going out now’ (Flora Nwapa, Nigeria, 1978:176).

Epilogue

Helen Bradley Foster

Source: “New Raiments of Self”. African American Clothing in the Antebellum South 1997

Book chapter

To want to understand is an attempt to recapture something we have lost (Peter Høeg 1994:37).

The West African Origin of the African-American Headwrap

Helen Bradley Griebel

Source: Dress and Ethnicity. Change Across Space and Time 1995

Book chapter

The study of African-American culture has been marked with controversy concerning what elements of West African culture survived for the peoples who were removed from their homeland and brought to a new continent where they found themselves in a position of bondage to people of alien cultures. All cultural groups constantly undergo change; certainly, much of the West Africans’ material world changed in the Americas, just as the material culture of their emigrant European counterparts changed. Eac

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