Results: Text (3) Images (0)

Filtered by:

Clear filters
Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 3 of 3 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Labels of Nazi Concentration Camps: The Star of David, Badges, and Markings of Those Persecuted by the Nazi Regime, 1933–1945

Mark Gudgel

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Today the order was issued that from now on Jews have to wear a yellow star-shaped patch. The order tells exactly how big the star patch must be, and that it must be sewn on every outer garment, jacket or coat. When grandma heard this, she started acting up again, and we called the doctor. He gave her an injection. She is asleep now.Eva Heyman, 31 March 1944Like 1.2 million others, most of them Jews like herself, thirteen-year-old Eva Heyman would eventually perish in Auschwitz, a victim of the N

Representing Authority: New Forms of Official Identity

Richard Wrigley

Source: The Politics of Appearances. Representations Of Dress In Revolutionary France, 2002, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The earliest days of the Revolution had seen the creation of the National Guard, an institution whose adoption of a uniform corresponded to the expression of a newly forged patriotic unity. To some extent, this proved to be a relatively uncontentious phenomenon in so far as the creation of a uniform was consistent with the essentially military nature of the Guard. Uniforms were, however, strongly associated with hierarchy. In the case of the Guard, this related to the social status of its members

Cockades: Badge Culture and its Discontents

Richard Wrigley

Source: The Politics of Appearances. Representations Of Dress In Revolutionary France, 2002, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Ubiquitous use, however contested, highlighted practical problems related to the fabrication and provision of cockades. In the context of discussions of patrie en danger legislation, Broussonnet noted that in the countryside many couldn’t afford to buy a cockade; one consequence of this was that people made their own. This resulted in variations which were as disturbing as they were irregular, such that, in September 1793, ‘revolutionary cavalry’ decided it was advisable to ban them.14 September

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 3 of 3 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1