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Surface-Specific Techniques

Anette Fischer and Kiran Gobin

Source: Construction for Fashion Design, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Felted woven fabrics are shrunk and compressed with heat, moisture and friction to produce a dense appearance. Some of the better-known felted fabrics are loden, melton or fleece. The edges of a felted fabric do not fray, so seams can be left unfinished. It is most common to use a plain stitched seam with top-stitching or a welt seam for light- to medium-weight felted fabric. But there are many more techniques to choose from, such as the following:

Rendering Concepts

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

For the purposes of this book, we will group the fabrics into four categories, which include: (1) wool and other textured fabrics; (2) shiny fabrics; (3) sheers; and (4) prints. To help you understand these breakdowns and categories, let's take a look at each one.

Textiles: Fibers and Fabrics

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: In Fashion, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Fashion and the materials from which they are made are inseparable. Have you ever bought a fashion product simply because you loved the feel of it? Perhaps it was rough and coarse or silky and smooth. Maybe it was incredibly soft to the touch. If so, then you, like almost everyone else, have responded to a fabric rather than to the style or color of a fashion product.

Leather and Fur

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: In Fashion, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Prehistoric people discovered that the animals they killed for food could serve another purpose, that of providing them with warmth and protection from the elements. Today, leather and fur are vital to the apparel, home furnishings, and automotive industries, contributing the raw materials for coats and jackets, handbags, shoes, gloves, and an ever-widening range of fashion products.

Ten: Quality, In the Nick of Time: Shinola

Joseph H. Hancock

Source: Brand Story. Cases and Explorations in Fashion Branding, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A 2014 Economist article titled “Mo’ time for Motown” lightheartedly related the history of Shinola. Tom Kartsotis, the founder of Bedrock Manufacturing (named for the famous Flintstone’s cartoon’s home-town), bought the name for the company from a longtime brand of shoe polish (founded in 1907) that was best known for the slogan “You can’t tell shit from Shinola.” This was absolute perfection for Kartsotis, who believes that this company can someday become the largest manufacturer of high-qualit

The Art of Textiles

Zoya Nudelman

Source: The Art of Couture Sewing, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Textiles are used by designers as their primary creative medium. For the designer, choosing the right fabrics for a particular design is one of the most important aspects of designing. Often the fabric itself can inspire the design; for example, soft, drapey fabric can inspire the designer to focus on gathers and ruffles. Most experienced designers can picture their designs completely finished and ready to go before the garments are done, and each and every one understands the importance of match

Talitha Getty

Osman Ahmed

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Talitha Dina Pol (1940–1971) was born in Bali. After moving to London in 1945, following a traumatic period spent with her birth mother in a Japanese POW camp, Talitha studied at Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts with hopes of becoming an actress. Young, beautiful, and exotic, she was courted and celebrated by London society, becoming the second wife of John Paul Getty Jnr., the son of oil tycoon Paul Getty, in 1966. She wore an all-white, mink-trimmed, hooded minidress that echoed the height of Swi

Dsquared2

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

“Coiled Corset,” Shaun Leane for Alexander McQueen, Fall/Winter 1999

Kate Bethune

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The “Coiled Corset” is an example of radical body adornment made by jeweler Shaun Leane for fashion designer Alexander McQueen’s collection “The Overlook” (fall/winter 1999). Leane, who originally trained as a jeweler and goldsmith, first worked with McQueen in 1995, when he made silver watch chains for his “Highland Rape” collection (fall/winter 1995). His creative collaborations with McQueen soon propelled him to work with new materials and on a much larger scale to create elaborate body sculpt

Hermès

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Prada

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Consuelo Castiglioni

Giulia Bussinello

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Gianfranco Ferré

Giulia Bussinello

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Mulberry

Amber Jane Butchart

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Ann Demeulemeester, Spring/Summer 1992

Elisa De Wyngaert

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The spring/summer collection of 1992 was Ann Demeulemeester’s first fashion show in Paris. She presented her looks alongside other young avant-garde Belgian designers, including Martin Margiela. The silhouettes of the collection featured some elements which would later become known as Demeulemeester’s signatures: feathers, a strong cut, and a kind of androgyny blended with poetic femininity. Yet these silhouettes also deviated from the monochromatic feel of her later work. Furthermore, Patti Smit

Vivienne Westwood, “Anglomania,” Fall/Winter 1993–1994

Hayley-Jane Edwards-Dujardin

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

From being queen of punk in the mid-1970s, Vivienne Westwood slightly moved, from the 1980s, to being a supporter of British fashion’s establishment. Inspired by traditional craftsmanship and eighteenth-century art, the designer has since infused her collections with historicism. With her fall/winter 1993–1994 “Anglomania” show, Vivienne Westwood epitomized her interest in English and Scottish traditions while mingling masculine tailoring with outrageously feminine forms. Featuring laced bodices,

Dai Rees

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Fur and Feathers

Jonathan Faiers

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Clothing made from animal skins and the plumage of birds provides some of the earliest examples of the human desire to adorn the body. From ancient history to the present day, furs and feathers have kept us warm, signaled our wealth and status, and made us feel protected and powerful, sensual and stunning. Yet the use of fur and feathers is also deeply controversial and has been the subject of legislation, prohibition, and outrage unlike any other aspect of the fashion industry. From mink to mara

Explore
Gloves ‘of the Very Thin Sort’: Gifting Limerick Gloves in the Late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries

Liza Foley

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Although leather was essential for the production of a wide range of eighteenth-century objects, including gloves, very little consideration has been given to the significance of the materiality of leather itself. As historian Giorgio Riello has shown, leather was a scarce material in pre-Industrial England. ‘Confined to the natural world and to a stable cattle asset’ (2008: 77), its production largely depended on the meat market, which, in the case of sheep, and to a greater extent cattle, accou

Louis Vuitton (house)

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Chanel Haute Couture, Karl Lagerfeld, Spring/Summer 1994

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

This collection was shown in Paris beneath the Louvre in the newly renovated Carrousel underground complex, the first time a fashion show had been organized underground. The collection attracted controversy because of three dresses printed with Arabic writing. When clerics in Indonesia protested, Lagerfeld apologized, destroyed the dresses, and asked journalists and photographers not to publish photos of them. The mannequins in this show were not just top models, but celebrities and actresses. Th

Dyeing and Staining Fabric

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

To dye fabric means to create a chemical bath of a colorant dissolved into water. Fabric is submersed and agitated until the color is sufficiently absorbed—this is known as the immersion technique, or tub dyeing method, a reliable method for even distribution of dye. Often a mordant, or dye carrier, is needed to help the dye adhere to the fabric and to provide colorfastness. The dye binds with the fabric molecularly to create long-lasting, vibrant colors.

Discharging Color and Using Resists

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A negative image or pattern on a dark-colored fabric or leather can be created by removing color (Figure 2.1). Color removal can also be beneficial as an all-over lightener or used before applying other dyes or prints to provide a lighter base, thus creating more vibrant results.

Printing and Transfer

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Printing is the act of applying an easily repeatable pattern to fabric. It can be done on any fabric or leather as long as the dye or paint is appropriate to the fiber content of that fabric (see Appendix A, Burn Test, page 252). A wide range of printing techniques have been in practice for much of human existence. Simple repeatable images can be created using blocks or stamps, while screen printing achieves clean crisp lines on a larger surface area.

Fiber Manipulation

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Removing fibers from fabric can be done with a product known as Fiber Etch. It is made of sodium bisulfate, water, glycerin, and printing paste. It works by removing the cellulose fibers from fabric creating a devoré, or burnout, effect on mixed fiber fabrics, and will remove sections of natural (cellulose) fibers on fabric, creating a cut-out effect.

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