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Ann Demeulemeester, Spring/Summer 1992

Elisa De Wyngaert

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The spring/summer collection of 1992 was Ann Demeulemeester’s first fashion show in Paris. She presented her looks alongside other young avant-garde Belgian designers, including Martin Margiela. The silhouettes of the collection featured some elements which would later become known as Demeulemeester’s signatures: feathers, a strong cut, and a kind of androgyny blended with poetic femininity. Yet these silhouettes also deviated from the monochromatic feel of her later work. Furthermore, Patti Smit

Fur and Feathers

Jonathan Faiers

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Clothing made from animal skins and the plumage of birds provides some of the earliest examples of the human desire to adorn the body. From ancient history to the present day, furs and feathers have kept us warm, signaled our wealth and status, and made us feel protected and powerful, sensual and stunning. Yet the use of fur and feathers is also deeply controversial and has been the subject of legislation, prohibition, and outrage unlike any other aspect of the fashion industry. From mink to mara

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Chanel Haute Couture, Karl Lagerfeld, Spring/Summer 1994

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This collection was shown in Paris beneath the Louvre in the newly renovated Carrousel underground complex, the first time a fashion show had been organized underground. The collection attracted controversy because of three dresses printed with Arabic writing. When clerics in Indonesia protested, Lagerfeld apologized, destroyed the dresses, and asked journalists and photographers not to publish photos of them. The mannequins in this show were not just top models, but celebrities and actresses. Th

Givenchy Couture, Fall/Winter 1990

Aimee Williams

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Two years after the acquisition of Givenchy by Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessey (LVMH), Givenchy’s fall/winter 1990 collection struggled to negotiate its legacy as a couture line and produce designs to appeal to a contemporary clientele. Elements that had worked in favor of the house in the 1980s drew criticism. While other designers unstructured their silhouettes, Givenchy presented square shoulders on wool suits and evening wear alike. Gold lamé and organza dresses with short, dipping hemlines were

Givenchy Couture, Spring/Summer 1997

Aimee Williams

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Alexander McQueen’s 1997 premiere at Givenchy following John Galliano’s departure resounded notably during the spring/summer couture showings, heralding the “revival of couture.” Showing at the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, the Grecian-inspired collection acknowledged the house’s defining conventions with double-breasted ivory suits and straightened silhouettes that hit above the knee. A generally neutral to white palette of silk, finely woven feathers, and gossamer textures

Hawaiian Dress Prior to 1898

Linda Boynton Arthur

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Hawai’i is an archipelago in the Pacific Ocean, a chain referred to simply as Hawai’i or the Hawaiian Islands. The six major islands are Oahu, Kauai, Maui, Molokai, Lanai, and the Big Island, that is, Hawai’i. The latter name is rarely used, in order to reduce confusion, since Hawai’i (the archipelago) became an American state in 1959. Until the late eighteenth century the peoples who inhabited these islands shared a common culture, although they were somewhat divided politically in that each had

Fans

Moira F. Harri

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A handheld fan, made of feathers, leaves, paper, or cloth, with sticks of ivory or wood, is one of the oldest accessories for men and women in the world. There are four basic styles: feather, leaf, folding, and flat. The best-known feather fans use the plumage of the African ostrich. Palm leaves often served as early fans, but any other large leaf could be used. A flat fan is sometimes said to be Chinese in origin. Round in shape, the framed surface could be paper or cloth such as silk or gauze.

Introduction to the Dress of the Pacific Islands

Adrienne L. Kaeppler

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Pacific Ocean covers one-third of the earth’s surface and is inhabited by hundreds of cultural groups. Some twenty-five thousand islands, ranging from tiny specks of coral to the large island of New Guinea, are occupied by physically diverse peoples, many of whom have mixed and intermixed. Environments range from snowy mountains to raging volcanoes, from steaming rain forests to parched deserts, from coral atolls to volcanic outcrops. These Pacific Islands are usually divided into three histo

Dressing the Body in Samoa

Sean Mallon

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Samoa consists of two large tropical islands and six smaller ones in the Pacific Ocean, northeast of Fiji. Its people are of Polynesian descent, and the islands have had a complex history of regional interaction. The tropical environment furnished flora and fauna utilized by the people of these islands for the construction of clothing and body modifications. During the nineteenth century dressing the body involved not only covering with garments but also marking or coloring the skin, wrapping it

Feathered Lingerie: From the Stage to the Bedroom

Jean McElvain and Angelina Jones

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the United States circus theater began about the time of colonization, and in 1825 the introduction of portable tents and the construction of the transcontinental railroad made shows widely available. Women were an integral part of the circus, and their brazen and often-dangerous performances were a curiosity that drew patrons. However, the transient nature of circus performers, as well as the exhibitionism played out during their routines, often situated female performers as immoral. The ense

Introduction to Māori Dress

Patricia Te Arapo Wallace

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

When early Eastern Polynesian navigators explored Te Moana-Nui ā-Kiwa (“The Great Sea of Kiwa,” or the Pacific Ocean), they discovered the world’s largest oceanic archipelago, Aotearoa—New Zealand. The temperate climate of this geographically isolated land had produced a restricted range of flora and fauna. Away from their tropical homelands, the voyaging ancestors of the Māori people discovered that survival in the colder climate required significantly warmer clothing. They experimented with new

Shopping, Sewing, Networking, Complaining: Consumer Practices and the Relationship between State and Society

Judd Stitziel

Source: Fashioning Socialism. Clothing, Politics, and Consumer Culture in East Germany 2005

Book chapter

Starting already in the late 1940s, East Germans embarked on shopping trips with very specific desires and went from store to store and even from city to city in efforts to satisfy them.LAB, C Rep. 106, Nr. 142, Aktenvermerk, Köhler, Planök. Abt., Berlin, 19 March 1949. During the first major stage in the elimination of rationing for clothing and shoes in February 1951, a state trade official remarked that “the streets offered an almost peacetime-like picture, that is, women are beginning to sele

North America: Feathers and Leather

Thomas S. Abler

Source: Hinterland Warriors and Military Dress. European Empires and Exotic Uniforms 1999

Book chapter

For five centuries the military of expanding Euro-American states have been in contact with native warriors in North America. This contact involved fighting between the two but also included the employment of North Americans as allies and auxiliaries against other native populations and in wars against other imperial powers. As will be seen, there was considerable use of the dress of the Indians by the military, and considerable use of military symbols by the Indians in their own dress.

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