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Prada

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Hermès

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Consuelo Castiglioni

Giulia Bussinello

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Mulberry

Amber Jane Butchart

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Dai Rees

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Gloves ‘of the Very Thin Sort’: Gifting Limerick Gloves in the Late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries

Liza Foley

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

Although leather was essential for the production of a wide range of eighteenth-century objects, including gloves, very little consideration has been given to the significance of the materiality of leather itself. As historian Giorgio Riello has shown, leather was a scarce material in pre-Industrial England. ‘Confined to the natural world and to a stable cattle asset’ (2008: 77), its production largely depended on the meat market, which, in the case of sheep, and to a greater extent cattle, accou

Louis Vuitton (house)

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Dirk Bikkembergs

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Copperwheat Blundell

Michelle Labrague

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

AllSaints

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Tristan Webber

Shonagh Marshall

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Amanda Wakeley

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Martine Sitbon

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Greasers

Else Skjold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

“Greasers” were devotees of a subcultural style originally for young, working-class men (later also women) that emerged in the 1950s in the United States. The word “grease” refers to the wax or pomade used to make the characteristic hairdo of the look, which also typically included biker boots, jeans, T-shirts, and leather jackets. Groupings of greasers would often appear in motorcycle gangs around the emerging rock ’n’ roll scene, and parts of the subculture formed the motorcycle club “Hell’s An

Cividini

Tory Turk

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Jacqueline Hancher

Tory Turk

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Kiss of the Whip: Bondage, Discipline and Sadomasochism, or BDSM Style

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style 2013

Book chapter

You modern men, you children of reason, cannot begin to appreciate love as pure bliss and divine serenity; indeed this kind of love is disastrous for men like you, for as soon as you try to be natural you become vulgar. To you Nature is an enemy. You have made devils of the smiling gods of Greece and have turned me into a creature of evil.

Lesbian and Gay Dress

Shaun Cole

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Although same-sex sexual activity has been occurring at least as long as the human race has been recording social activity, it was not until the late nineteenth century that terminology based on sexual identity replaced definitions and descriptions of sexual acts. Psychiatrists, sexologists, and human rights campaigners such as Richard von Krafft-Ebing, Karl Heinrich Ulrichs, and Karl Maria Kertbeny developed notions that same-sex attraction was related to identity and conceived terms such as urn

The Black Leather Jacket

Marilyn DeLong, Kelly Gage, Juyeon Park and Monica Sklar

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the United States, the black leather jacket has been worn throughout much of the twentieth century. During World Wars I and II it was worn mostly for its functional and protective properties, for example, by pilots, who wore the leather bomber jacket. When the leather jacket became the choice of heroic wartime figures such as General Patton in World War II, the details of the jacket were not yet strictly defined.

Namibia

Hildi Hendrickson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In Namibia, the oldest indigenous forms of dress were made from the leather hides of wild and domesticated animals, decorated with shell and locally made metal beads. Before the Colonial period, differing cultural groups and social subgroups distinguished themselves through formalized yet highly inventive hairstyles, headgear, and types of tooth modification. Cloth dress was slowly introduced via Europeans and was adopted in uneven ways. Some indigenous people began wearing cloth early in the Col

South Asian Footwear: History, Tradition, and Contemporary Trends

Jutta Jain-Neubauer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

It was, and still is, a common practice to walk barefoot in rural India, a frequent form of adornment being anklets. Traditionally, shoes were worn for protection against severe climatic or topographic conditions. That the aristocracy may have developed a taste for footwear in the early centuries c.e. is evident from sculptural representations. It is conceivable that the various styles of footwear evolved through a fusion of indigenous traditions with Greco-Roman and Kushan influences. The use of

Steampunk

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the late 1980s, a literary subgenre emerged from science fiction and fantasy. Set in an alternate history of the nineteenth century, this subgenre is described as steampunk, a term coined in 1987 by author K. W. Jeter as a tongue-in-cheek analogy with cyberpunk. Both literary genres turn out cautionary tales of the perils of technology in the hands of the unscrupulous. Yet while cyberpunk looks with trepidation toward a dystopian future dominated by advanced technology, steampunk looks backwar

Cyberpunk

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

“Cyberpunk” refers to a subgenre of postmodern science-fiction literature set in a dystopian near-future in which alienated countercultural antiheroes struggle to survive and reclaim power in a society dominated by technology and mega-corporations. The term originated from the title of a story written in 1982 by Bruce Bethke, who combined the term “cybernetics,” the science of replacing human functions with computerized ones, and “punk,” the nihilistic counterculture youth movement that originate

Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgendered Persons

Andrew Reilly

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Reliable information about dress in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered (LGBT) community has become available only recently. For many years negative attitudes held by much of the non-LGBT population resulted in beliefs and stereotypes that were often superficial and inaccurate. Research into the dress of members of the LGBT community is now providing a more detailed and nuanced view of the subject. When a person “comes out” or acknowledges an LGBT identity, it is often a mixed blessing;

Footwear in Australia

Lindie Ward

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Warm to hot summers, and preferences for the outdoor life, sport, and leisure have created a unique environment for the evolution of specific footwear made and used in Australia. Early Aborigines in the south Kimberley region wore shoes of felted emu feathers, yet going barefoot has been common at times for all Australians, although less so today. There was significant early demand for shoes for convicts and free settlers, which local tradespeople could not meet. As more affluent settlers arrived

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