Results: Text (20) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 20 of 20 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Katharine Hamnett

Amber Jane Butchart

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

The Utility Clothing Scheme

Geraldine Howell

Source: Wartime Fashion. From Haute Couture to Homemade, 1939–1945 2012

Book chapter

Dress in New Caledonia

Frédéric Angleviel

Translated by Marissa Dooris

Vikram Iyer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

New Caledonia, situated in the southwest Pacific Ocean, comprises a number of islands including the Loyalty Islands, Isle des Pins, and Isle Bélep. The warm climate and tropical vegetation have had a substantial influence on what the inhabitants have worn and do wear. In the past the indigenous people of New Caledonia, the Melanesian Kanaks, embellished their bodies in various ways. Subsequently, evangelical missionaries urged these people to hide their bodies. In the twenty-first century consume

Dress of Vanuatu

Lissant Bolton and Jean Tarisesei

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Vanuatu is an archipelago of about eighty small islands in the southwestern Pacific. It is one of the most linguistically complex regions of the world: More than 113 languages are spoken in these islands by a population (at the start of the twenty-first century) of about 200,000. This linguistic diversity is matched by cultural diversity: Not just every island, but every district has had its own distinctive knowledge and practice, and often, its own distinctive dress styles. This diversity from p

Belgium

Karlijn Bronselaer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Belgium played a vital role in the industrialization of the European textile industry. Belgian society changed very quickly due to industrialization during the first half of the nineteenth century. From about the 1820s on the fashionable silhouette in West Europe was the hourglass. Although the average Belgian had neither time nor money for fashion, improved production methods and sewing machines made corsets more affordable. Later, the Art Nouveau or Jugendstil movement (ca. 1890–1920), with its

Body Ornaments of Solomon Islands

Ben Burt

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The country of Solomon Islands was formed in the 1890s by British colonization of a chain of islands in the southwest Pacific region of Melanesia. From west to east these include the major islands of Choiseul, New Georgia, Santa Isabel, Guadalcanal, Malaita, and Makira, with many smaller groups from Shortland Islands in the west to Santa Cruz far to the east. Like other island Melanesians in Papua New Guinea to the west and Vanuatu to the east, Solomon Islanders live by farming, foraging, and fis

Miao National Minority

Gina Corrigan

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Today, the Miao ethnic minority live in southwestern China, their population totaling 8.9 million. Miao origins and migrations are controversial and poorly documented, but we know that attempts to subdue them have been difficult. Miao in remote mountain regions developed many garments, expressing cultural identity. In 2000 a book published in China illustrated 173 different styles of Miao dress. Following the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, the female population in the countryside again adopted trad

Li National Minority

Anne Csete

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Li national minority of Hainan Island, with a population of 1.24 million, is officially divided into five subgroups: Qi, Ha, Sai, Run, and Meifu. Li dress varies among these subgroups, but common elements include a sarong-like tube skirt, female tattooing, and methods of traditional cloth production. Han cloth and thread were incorporated into Li weaving and embroidery by at least the Song dynasty (960–1279), when significant numbers of Li began to adopt Chinese dress and customs. Li weaving

History of Textiles of South Asia

Jasleen Dhamija

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

South Asia’s rich cultural heritage is expressed in the continuing tradition of textiles, going back nearly five thousand years. Although silk was an important textile very early, it was cotton, cultivated in most parts of South Asia and developed as a fabric, that was probably exported to other countries. Cultivated cotton, developed in the Indian subcontinent around 3000 b.c.e., was woven throughout India. South Asia was open to several contacts through trade, migrations, and conquest, enrichin

Ainu

Chisato O. Dubreuil

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Ainu, the indigenous people of Japan, live throughout Japan, but most are concentrated on the northernmost island of Hokkaido (formally known as Ezo). The definition of the word Ainu is “the people” or “humans.” Their homeland, Ainu-mosir (the Land of Humans), originally included southern Sakhalin, the lower Amur River region, the southern tip of the Kamchatka Peninsula, the Kurile Islands, Hokkaido, and at least the Tohoku region of Japan’s main island, Honshū. While there are no known full-

Dress of the Chamorro

Judith S. Flores

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Chamorro are the indigenous people of the Mariana Islands in the Western Pacific area of Micronesia. At the time of first European contact in 1521, and in subsequent visitor descriptions throughout the sixteenth century, Chamorros were described as being unclothed, or in the case of some women covered only in their pubic areas. Missionaries arrived in 1668, and the islands were subjugated by Spain from that time until American takeover in 1899. The Chamorro population was so reduced from dise

Linen

Margarita Gleba

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Since prehistory, linen, made from flax, has been one of the most widely used textile materials. Linen does not take easily to natural dyes, so before the advent of synthetic colorants it was rarely dyed. Linen is particularly suitable for utilitarian fabrics, owing to its strength, low elasticity, and durability. The earliest known textiles are linen. In Europe, flax was cultivated by the second half of the seventh millennium b.c.e. Some surviving fabrics are so fine that they still cannot be du

Revival of Piña Cloth and Dress: Southern Luzon and Central Philippines

B. Lynne Milgram

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Contemporary designers and manufacturers in the Philippines have revived the production of piña cloth and dress since the 1990s. Piña, a diaphanous cloth woven from the fibers of the leaves of the pineapple plant, is a textile synonymous with cloth production in the central Philippines. From the height of its popularity in the late eighteenth to early nineteenth centuries under Spanish colonial rule, demands for garments made from piña cloth decreased to periodic orders by the early twentieth cen

The Southwest

Nancy J. Parezo

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The American Southwest and northwestern Mexico compose a culture area that is called the Greater Southwest, which since 1848 has been divided by two modern nation-states and influenced by each nation’s history, policy, and attire. As the arid homeland to a wealth of both well-known and little-known cultures, the Southwest has expressed a rich and varied history of attire, defined by both lifestyles and cultures. Based on a basic desert adaptation of prepared animal hide and woven fiber attire, wh

Cotton

Giorgio Riello

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Although archaeological evidence shows cotton was known in Europe during the Roman Empire, it was only after 1100 that this fiber was used by Europeans. Even then, Europeans did not produce cloth entirely made of cotton due to the scarcity of the raw material in the continent. By the time of the so-called little ice age of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, cotton had ceased to be grown even in temperate climates like that of southern Italy. Small quantities of Indian textiles probably reac

The Textile Industry

Michiel Scheffer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The textile industry covers the sequence of production stages, starting from fibers through clothing assembly. Europe’s textile industry has been significant in both economic and cultural history. It was the first sector to industrialize and was therefore at the core of the pervasive economic and social changes that took place in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. For more than a century, the advantages of large-scale cloth production made West Europe a world leader in this trade, but since

Niue: Dress, Hats, and Woven Accessories

Hilke Thode-Arora

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The small Polynesian island of Niue is one of the highest coral islands in the world. Only its plateau, rising with steep cliffs above a jagged coastline, can be inhabited. Throughout Niue’s history droughts and famines have been experienced with regularity. There are no rivers on the island, and, although soil is fertile, vast stretches of land have been exhausted by shifting cultivation and ill-advised agricultural programs of the past. The soil is easily blown off by frequent and often devasta

Manos de Uruguay: A Cooperative Umbrella

Lynn A. Meisch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Uruguay, a small country on the southeastern coast of South America, has a population of just under four million. Its temperate climate and relatively thin soil make it perfect for sheep and cattle ranching; its principal exports are dairy products, wool, beef, hides, and grain. Criolla sheep were introduced to Uruguay from Peru via Argentina in the early seventeenth century. These descended from the Merino sheep brought to Peru by the Spanish. Merino wool has a silky feel and helps eliminate scr

Pre-Hispanic Northern Peru

Amy Oakland

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Although rare in most parts of the world, objects of a usually perishable nature including wood, feathers, plant materials, and ancient textiles have been preserved from early periods along the desert Pacific Coast of South America, a region extending from central Peru to northern Chile. Periodic rainfall on the north coast of Peru and seasonal rain in the highland regions have destroyed most ancient fabric there, but contact between regions has assured the preservation of highland cloth on the c

Morrales in Guatemala

Kathryn Rousso

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

As in many regions of the world, the indigenous people of Guatemala devised ways to make baskets and bags from local materials to carry and contain objects. One of these is called the morral (net bag), and it is still used by villagers living in rugged mountainous terrain where walking long distances is part of life. Their traje (traditional clothing) does not have pockets, and morrales are necessary to carry food, tools, clothing, and other items needed in the fields or market or on the journey.

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 20 of 20 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1