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Fibers (Swatches 1-15)

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Kosuke Tsumura

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Ironing Out The Creases: Artificial Fibres and Menswear Advertising

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

North American Influences on West European Dress

Rebecca Arnold

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

North America’s effect on West European fashion is often viewed only in relation to Hollywood and celebrity. However, its influence has been far more diverse, from technological inventions to leisure wear and the professionalization of the industry.

Synthetic And Special Application Fibers

Virginia Hencken Elsasser

Source: Textiles. Concepts and Principles, 3rd Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The first synthetic fiber, nylon, was introduced in 1939 by DuPont. The fiber, which was as sheer as silk but much stronger, revolutionized the hosiery industry. (See CP-6) Since their introduction, chemically synthesized fibers or synthetic fibers, also called noncellulosic manufactured fibers or chemical fibers, have become prominent in the textile industry. The primary synthetic fibers are acrylic, modacrylic, nylon, olefin, polyester, and spandex.

Underwear

Grace Evans

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The fashionable silhouette has gone through bewildering changes during the last two hundred years, and these would not have been possible without the shapes created beneath. Underwear and outerwear progressed in tandem. Underwear designers responded to prevailing styles of fashionable dress, and fashion designers built and relied upon the capabilities of structural underpinnings as they developed. These changes were, in turn, influenced by key social, economic, and technological developments, whi

Hosiery

Nan H. Mutnick

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Before the twentieth century, hosiery had seldom enjoyed the fashion limelight with other accessories of dress. During the nineteenth century, hosiery was made from cotton, silk, or very fine wool. Those living in the colder climates, such as northern Canada, would have used heavier-weight wool for warmth. Colors for women were dictated by fashion, sometimes matching the dress, petticoat, or shoes. Synthetic dyes, developed from a coal-tar derivative in 1856, allowed for modern, sharp, and bright

Nylon

Annie Gullingsrud

Foreword by Lynda Grose

Illustrations by Amy Williams

Source: Fashion Fibers. Designing For Sustainability, 2001, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Nylon 6 and 6,6 share a lot of the same fiber characteristics. They have strong wear resistance, abrasion resistance, chemical resistance, and heat resistance; are lustrous; have a high melting point; and are resilient.Ensinger, Polyamides n.d.

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