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Dyed Fabrics (Swatches 76–80)

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Printed Fabrics (Swatches 81–88)

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Dyeing and Staining Fabric

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

To dye fabric means to create a chemical bath of a colorant dissolved into water. Fabric is submersed and agitated until the color is sufficiently absorbed—this is known as the immersion technique, or tub dyeing method, a reliable method for even distribution of dye. Often a mordant, or dye carrier, is needed to help the dye adhere to the fabric and to provide colorfastness. The dye binds with the fabric molecularly to create long-lasting, vibrant colors.

Combining Techniques

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Video Tutorial: Combining Techniques

Textile Dyeing

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Color is an important marketing factor with textile products. It is the color of the dyed (or printed) fabric that first attracts and then draws consumers to particular items for sale. It is often the color of a product that sells the product. (See Figure 8.1.)

Blue

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Blue ranks as one of the most variegated shades of the fashion palette, from palest sky blue to blue-black navy. The wild plants (indigo) and precious gems (lapis lazuli) once used to create blue dyes have given way, for the most part, to synthetic chemicals. Designers have channeled bright blues during seasons of vivid coloration, or subtle washes of blue to suggest “no-color” color, with some of the richest colorations used in head-to-toe ensembles. Whether in the blue jean revolution of the 19

Measuring Quality Through Raw Materials And Product Testing Lab

Janace E. Bubonia

Source: Apparel Quality Lab Manual, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Chapters 11 and 12 of Apparel Quality: A Guide to Evaluating Sewn Products focus on the importance of standard test methods to provide a means for companies to obtain reliable, reproducible results regarding the materials and garments they are producing and selling. A garment's appearance and performance plays a major role in customer satisfaction and perception of quality. Testing and evaluating materials and finishe

Coloring Agents

Edith Anderson Feisner and Ronald Reed

Source: Color Studies, 3rd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After reading this chapter, you will be able to:

Chapter ten: The Textile Industry

Jay Diamond and Ellen Diamond

Source: The World of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Isn’t it wonderful to unpack wool jersey and thumb your nose at an iron?

Color and Texture

Martin M. Pegler

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 6th Edition, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After You Have Read This Chapter, You Will Be Able To Discuss

Textiles, Trims, Findings, and Materials

Chelsea Rousso

Source: Fashion Forward. A Guide to Fashion Forecasting, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Textiles, trims, findings, and materials forecasting is a process of collecting, editing, interpreting, and analyzing information to be able to predict the textiles, materials, trims, and findings that will be popular in upcoming seasons. As in theme and color, forecasters research and use their creativity, instinct, and experience to sense tactile shifts. Consumers are greatly influenced by the feel of textiles or the allure of new materials. Forecasting of emerging fabrications aids many differ

West Africa

Lisa Aronson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

West African markets are well known for their tightly packed displays of textiles in rich arrays of colors and patterns, and tailors on their sewing machines can be heard everywhere sewing visually striking garments that seldom go unnoticed when worn in public. So vital and richly varied are textiles in West Africa that even prominent contemporary artists such as El Anatsui from Ghana and Nigeria and Yinka Shonibare from Nigeria are inspired by them as powerful mediums for discourse on historical

Miao National Minority

Gina Corrigan

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Today, the Miao ethnic minority live in southwestern China, their population totaling 8.9 million. Miao origins and migrations are controversial and poorly documented, but we know that attempts to subdue them have been difficult. Miao in remote mountain regions developed many garments, expressing cultural identity. In 2000 a book published in China illustrated 173 different styles of Miao dress. Following the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, the female population in the countryside again adopted trad

Li National Minority

Anne Csete

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The Li national minority of Hainan Island, with a population of 1.24 million, is officially divided into five subgroups: Qi, Ha, Sai, Run, and Meifu. Li dress varies among these subgroups, but common elements include a sarong-like tube skirt, female tattooing, and methods of traditional cloth production. Han cloth and thread were incorporated into Li weaving and embroidery by at least the Song dynasty (960–1279), when significant numbers of Li began to adopt Chinese dress and customs. Li weaving

Nineteenth-Century Medical Views on Dress

Margaret Deppe

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Much attention has been given to the social context of clothing in the past as dress and fashion phenomena are critical indicators concerning the economic, political and ideological components of a given society. In England and North America in the nineteenth century, the tight lacing of ladies’ corsets was a function of clothing fashion as well as a fashion in morality and an indicator of social and economic status. Physicians joined dress reformers in repeatedly issuing warnings against tight l

Dyeing And Printing

Virginia Hencken Elsasser

Source: Textiles. Concepts and Principles, 3rd Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In general, consumers expect two things. The first is aesthetically pleasing colors and prints. Most authorities agree that the color or printed design of a fabric is the most important factor in the customer’s decision to purchase apparel or furnishings.

Indonesia

Itie van Hout

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Diverse cultural elements have shaped the Indonesian archipelago, changing dress traditions. Before weaving was known, leaves, plant fibers, and barkcloth were used for clothing. Cotton, not native to Indonesia, may have arrived from India. Early clothing probably consisted of loincloths and hip wrappers. Later dress, particularly ceremonial, comprised layers of clothing. Textiles, imbued with magical qualities, were crucial to relationships between the supernatural and human worlds. By the seven

Shuri Textile Manufacture

Ginko Le Bars Miyahira

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The Okinawan archipelago is the only tropical region in Japan; the islands’ abundant vegetation provides suitable material for weaving and dyeing. From 1429 to 1879, the Ryūkyū kingdom united Okinawa, governing under the dynastic title Shō. In the early seventeenth century, Okinawa came under Japanese control. However, the Japanese government found it expedient to continue recognizing the Shō dynasty, enabling the Ryūkyū kingdom to continue trading abroad. In the nineteenth century Okinawa was an

Indigo

Tineke Rooijakkers

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Indigo is a chemical substance made from indigotin, which produces a blue color. It can be used to dye textiles, but also paper and even skin. It is the only natural dye that can produce a colorfast blue that does not fade through sunlight. It is impossible to distinguish between indigotin obtained from woad and from Indigofera plants, as the result is chemically identical. This fact, combined with the relative scarcity of early archaeological textiles, makes reconstructing the early history of t

Approach to knit

Juliana Sissons

Source: Basics Fashion Design 06: Knitwear, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Developments in technology enable new ways of creating knitwear and knitted textiles, but many students and designers are looking to traditional techniques to inspire them and merge with contemporary ideas. Designers are capitalising on the unique qualities that knit has to offer, pushing boundaries with unusual yarns and materials and playing with scale. There is a natural interplay between craft, design and new technology. We will look at some of these traditional knits – fishermen’s ganseys, A

Henna

Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Henna has been used to decorate people, as well as garments, for thousands of years. One of the earliest written texts referring to the use of henna comes from the Ugaritic legend (from modern northwestern Syria) of Baal and Anath, which dates from about 2000 b.c.e. Slightly more recently, in the Old Testament of the Bible, the use of henna, which is called camphire, can be found in the Song of Songs and the Song of Solomon. Since then, henna has been used by many men and women throughout the Med

Stretch Terms and Jargon

Keith Richardson

Source: Designing and Patternmaking for Stretch Fabrics, 2008, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Because of the former segmentation of the garment industry, into eveningwear, knitwear, and swimwear, the stretch industry has its own terminology and jargon. The stretch designer and patternmaker must understand the specific terms in order to communicate ideas, details, and specifications to manufacturers and contractors.

Southern Highland Peru

Andrea M. Heckman

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean, 2005, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Cloth serves many purposes in the daily and ritual lives of contemporary Quechua people in the southern highlands of Peru. Handwoven alpaca and sheep-wool textiles provide the basic needs of warmth and protection in these rugged, cold mountain environments. The people of the vast cordilleras (mountain ranges) stretching from Cuzco to Lake Titicaca were in many ways deeply influenced by their ancient Tiwanaku and Inka ancestors. In the Inka Empire and the era of its influence, now known as the Lat

Textile Arts of the Mapuche of Chile

Grace Johnson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean, 2005, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The Mapuche, whose name means “people of the land,” still live close to the land and follow their traditions, which explains the survival of their culture and textiles. In pre-Hispanic times, they were nomadic fishermen and hunter-gatherers, clad in furs. After becoming farmers, they became skilled in weaving, basketry, and pottery. In the mid-fifteenth century, the powerful Inkas invaded Chile. Although unable to conquer the Mapuche, Inka influence on Mapuche culture was considerable. Among othe

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