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Stripes and Plaids

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A stripe is a band of color or texture that may be vertical, horizontal, or diagonal. It can be woven or printed in one or many colors and the stripes may vary in width. Using the center-front principle we can begin to understand vertical and horizontal stripes, which when combined form a pattern called a plaid. A plaid is a design of stripes intersecting at right angles.

Rendering Concepts

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

For the purposes of this book, we will group the fabrics into four categories, which include: (1) wool and other textured fabrics; (2) shiny fabrics; (3) sheers; and (4) prints. To help you understand these breakdowns and categories, let's take a look at each one.

Dsquared2

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Fabrics and Cutting

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Defining Prints and Patterns

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The subject of defining patterns is discussed and demonstrated throughout this book and is the focus of this chapter. In later chapters, even more textiles, treatments, and finishes will be covered.

Basic Rendering Techniques

Bina Abling

Source: Fashion Sketchbook, 6th Edition, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

You learned to draw a gesture sketch in Chapter 3. A gesture sketch is the beginning pose premise for either a croquis or a finished drawing. It can be done in line on tracing paper or started by applying fleshtone directly onto marker paper. It won’t matter if there is a pen or pencil outline on the croquis sketch. Rough or more smooth-looking, it is still a loose drawing for content. As you work on your rendering fo

Tweed

Fiona Anderson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Tweed cloth originated in Scotland in the early nineteenth century. At that time, it was only made from woolen yarns in the twill weave. From the 1820s to the present, tweed has been characterized by a huge range of color and weave effects. The main account given for the origins of the name tweed is that it is based on a misreading of the Scottish word tweel or twill (which was the weave characteristic of Scottish woolens at that time) for tweed. By the 1840s, tweed was established as a term used

Indian Madras: From Currency to Identity

Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Indian madras plaids are a grouping of yarn-dyed cotton fabrics woven in South India, often by hand. India has a long history of producing cotton fabrics for export markets, dating from at least the first century c.e. and perhaps as early as 3000 b.c.e. Variations on the basic checked or plaid cotton fabric are known by many names including lungi, telia rumal, real madras handkerchief (RMHK), injiri, george cloth, bleeding madras, and Indian madras, representing their use in Southeast Asia, Afric

Scotland

Naomi E.A. Tarrant

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

By 1800, those people in Scotland who could afford it dressed in the style of clothing usually known as fashionable West European. This was no different from the dress of others of their class within Britain. There is no folk dress in Scotland, but there are some types of occupational dress that have been associated with Scotland or with particular types of work. Those who had little income for clothing dressed in what they could afford or were given by charities. As in former times, secondhand c

Indian Madras Plaids as Real India

Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: Dress Sense. Emotional and Sensory Experiences of the Body and Clothes, 2007, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The history of the Indian textile trade is well documented (Chaudhuri 1978; Irwin 1955, 1956; Irwin & Schwartz 1966). Many secondary sources contain glossaries of textile trade terms, which I used to compile a glossary of synonyms for Real India over time. From this Real India glossary, I identified the following terms that could be traced, one to another, through time, to Real India:

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