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Clements Ribeiro

Amber Jane Butchart

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Kostas Murkudis

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Flyte Ostell

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Amanda Wakeley

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Anne Klein

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Laura Biagiotti

Laura Snelgrove

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

The Kashmir Shawl: A Historical Study

Janet Rizvi

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Kashmir produced export-quality textiles from at least the fourteenth century onwards, although the nature of the earliest ones is uncertain. By the late sixteenth century, fine Kashmir textiles were identified as shawl, meaning a twill-woven fabric in pashmina (cashmere) sourced from western Tibet. This material was made up not only as shoulder mantles but also as waist girdles, and in lengths to be tailored into men’s garments, as well as other forms. Only in the nineteenth century was the term

The Kashmir Shawl and Its Use in the Indo-Islamic World and Europe

Janet Rizvi

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

For the entire period of its known history, the classic Kashmir shawl, woven in twill tapestry from the finest trans-Himalayan goat pashm (cashmere), was manufactured as an export item, destined for the highest end of the market in plains India, Afghanistan, Iran, and the Ottoman Empire, and later in Europe and the United States. The industry was highly structured, and its output was tailored to the demand of particular markets. Merchants from foreign countries traveled to Srinagar, Kashmir’s cap

The Management of Colour: The Kashmir Shawl in a Nineteenth-Century Debate

David Brett

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

Writing about colour has always been difficult because colour is notoriously resistant to language. The inter-translatability of colour names and terms between languages is remarkably diffuse, which is a sure sign of their odd logical status. Even where we might expect coherent theory, in the art of painting, discourse on colour was generally defined (negatively) as against disegno, drawing as form and composition. This was true until the mid-nineteenth century, and remains influential. There is

Consuming Kashmir: Shawls and Empires, 1500–2000

Michelle Maskiell

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

Kashmiri shawls and shawl cloth were well-known exports within Asia and moved through established trade networks linking international areas of demand long before the shawls became European commodities. From the sixteenth through the eighteenth century, Kashmiri artisans wove cloth from Central Asian goat fleece, silk, and other materials. Dealers brought unprocessed goat hair to Kashmir from the city of Leh in Ladakh (see Map 1), the long-established entrêpot between Kashmir and Central Asia.Lad

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