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Knit Fabrics

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Knitting is the second major method of constructing a textile. Weaving was invented thousands of years before knitting; knits are relative newcomers. As such, knitting structures borrow a lot of their terms and surfaces from woven fabrics. Notice that some knit fabrics even share the same or similar names as woven fabrics, such as piqués, ribs, and jacquards. It can be quite confusing. In the past decade, the knit market has grown exponentially, taking on a much larger share of the textile market

Getting the Knack of Knits

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Knit fabric is a stretchable material constructed on huge knitting machines and formed by a series of horizontal interlocking loops (see Figure 1.1). The sizes of the needles and yarns used determine whether the knit will be fine or chunky. Knit fabrics come in a variety of fibers and vary in type, structure, texture, and weight. Some knits are knitted with a smooth surface. Other surfaces are textured and may be knotty, nubby, loopy, brushed, embossed, or textured. How the loops are arranged det

Markus Lupfer

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Emilio Pucci

Rio Ali

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Coco Chanel

Aimee Scott

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Anne Klein

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Wrap Dress, Diane von Furstenberg, 1974

Linda Welters

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The name of Diane von Furstenberg (originally von Fürstenberg) is inextricably linked to the wrap dress that she introduced to American women in 1974. Within two years, she had sold over two million units, a feat that landed her on the cover of the 22 March 1976 issue of Newsweek. The popularity of her sexy, printed, jersey wrap dress waned in the late 1970s. When renewed interest in 1970s styles surfaced in the late 1990s, Diane von Furstenberg reintroduced the wrap dress. Other leading designer

Sweater Design and Manufacturing

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Tensegrity

Aura Taylor

Source: Fashion Thinking. Creative Approaches to the Design Process, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After developing 3D ‘lace’ with pins and thread on the dress form, Aura started sourcing materials, doodling and sketching out her initial design ideas. Within this process she also worked with 2D/3D draping to better visualize shapes in 3D. She sourced perforated suede and leathers that would further reinforce the acupuncture idea, flocked face neoprene foam to support the 3D ‘lace’, along with rivets, silk and elastic cords, and coated nylon/silk organza. The fabrics were selected with two main

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