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Plain Weaves

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The difference between fiber and fabric is one of the most fundamental concepts in textiles and generally one of the most misunderstood. Fibers are the basic building materials. Fabrics are the final result of weaving, knitting, or minor fabrications. Identifying the fiber content is important, but it does not provide the complete picture for predicting performance. Think of describing a house by labeling it as wood. While the house may be built primarily of wood, that description does not create

Complex Weaves

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Crepe is a general term for a group of fabrics that are made using one of several methods of construction. This is a reclassification of fabrics previously analyzed. The overview that follows reveals the differences in construction, while maintaining performance expectations. Structure is not a constant in this category.

Rendering Concepts

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

For the purposes of this book, we will group the fabrics into four categories, which include: (1) wool and other textured fabrics; (2) shiny fabrics; (3) sheers; and (4) prints. To help you understand these breakdowns and categories, let's take a look at each one.

Dolce & Gabbana, Spring/Summer 1997

Tessa Maffucci

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Dolce & Gabbana’s spring/summer collection of 1997 capitalized on their strengths. Sensual chiffon hugged curvaceous (but trim) hips and bra straps peeked out from under delicate, negligee-inspired fishtail gowns. The palette of the runway was punctuated by animal prints and florals, often visible beneath the sheer material of the dresses or through open-weave crochet sweaters. Their look is sexy and upbeat, drawing influence from Domenico Dolce’s Sicilian heritage and the imagery of Italian film

Zandra Rhodes, Spring/Summer 1984

Veronica Maldonado

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Rhodes’s spring/summer 1984 collection made its debut in London’s Ritz Carlton hotel. Having studied textiles before designing fashion, Rhodes’s garments utilize fabric with a high degree of detail and craftsmanship. This collection was no exception, with dresses made of embroidered chiffon, metallic sequined ensembles, and dresses encrusted with hanging pearls and crystals, all in pastel color schemes accented with blazes of magenta and deep cerulean. While a few typical 1980s body-conscious, sh

Flyte Ostell

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Amanda Wakeley

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Martine Sitbon

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Anna Sui, Spring/Summer 1995

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Anna Sui drew significantly from the 1940s to put together her spring/summer 1995 collection. While the dresses and skirts were ladylike in their silhouettes, they were saved from being conservative by the rubberized chiffon Sui used. This translucent material made visible the bare breasts and light-colored boy shorts underneath, such as in a halter top and pleated skirt combination in matching prints that bared the midriff. Tropical daytime looks, which were emphasized with flower crowns and lei

“Digital Duo” Color Flats, Floats, Design, and Presentation

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The primary objective of this chapter is to teach you how to create exceptional 3-D digital color flats and floats from technical drawings. Therefore, the tutorials in Chapters 12, 13, and 14 should be completed before attempting the ones here. In fact, some of the technical flats presented in Chapter 14 will be enhanced in this one. This chapter also culminates all the lessons in the book, and reinforces the skills you will need to create a totally digital fashion portfolio presentation. In this

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