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Capital of Luxury and Fashion

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History 3rd Edition 2017

Book chapter

Je suis un grand artist, j’ai la couleur de Delacroix, et je compose. Une toilette vaut un tableau.

Chanel and Her Rivals

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History 3rd Edition 2017

Book chapter

Sandwiched between two world wars, between Poiret’s harem and Dior’s New Look, two women dominated the field of haute couture—Schiaparelli and Chanel.

Fashion’s World Cities

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History 3rd Edition 2017

Book chapter

Paris has changed, the system has changed, everything has been transformed. For the system to function, the participants have to be international, production has to be international. It’s clear that we no longer can or should be 100% French anymore.

Gianfranco Ferré

Giulia Bussinello

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Christian Dior Haute Couture by John Galliano, Fall/Winter 1997–1998

Waleria Dorogova

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Following his enthusiastically celebrated debut at Dior, for his second couture collection, John Galliano staged another highly theatricalized défilé in the notoriously gallant environment of the Jardin de Bagatelle. It was the first set design in a series commissioned from Michael Howells, who created complementing backdrops for Galliano’s garments and scenography. Aesthetical measures established in the first show for spring—traditional visual codes and the sartorial heritage of Christian Dior,

Book chapter

Using legacies left to them by their mother Emma, and with financial help from their father, Norman Hartnell and his sister Phyllis opened a couture house on a small scale at 10 Bruton Street, Mayfair in 1923. By 1934 Hartnell had become a very successful and wealthy couture fashion designer, and the firm moved to much larger premises at 26 Bruton Street, employing up to 500 staff and producing thousands of couture garments a year by 1939. A close study of reviews of his fashion collections in th

Marc Jacobs

Casey Mackenzie Johnson

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Yves Saint Laurent

Casey Mackenzie Johnson

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Tomasz Starzewski

Nanna Marie Lund

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Tristan Webber

Shonagh Marshall

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Antony Price

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Modeling History: How Models Have Changed Between the 1970s and 2000

Julia Rea

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The role and significance of the fashion model has been subject to a series of profound changes since the professionalization of the occupation in the late nineteenth century. These variations have been catalyzed by a wide range of social, cultural, and creative influences, from shifting trends in photography and fashion and changing ideals of beauty and femininity to the advent of technology, the Internet, and social media. When Vogue launched in the United States in 1892, the magazine’s fashion

Darzi to “Designer”: Crafting Couture and High-Fashion for India

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

Over the past 20 years, the field of fashion in India has changed significantly. We see a shift from an industry that solely supported Western markets through exports, to an fashion design, Indianas a cultural activityfashion design, Indianindustry’s estimate worth (in 2012)fashion design, Indiankey distinguishing factorsfashion weeks, IndianFDCI (Fashion Design Council of India)industry that has begun to take Indian consumers, their tastes and their potential market base into consideration. Indi

Ungaro, Spring/Summer 1984

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Emanuel Ungaro’s spring/summer 1984 show in Paris was significant for a number of reasons. As a couturier, and a highly regarded one, he was a big part of the conversation in Parisian couture and close attention was paid to his shows—both ready-to-wear and couture. This attention meant that he garnered a lot of press, and his spring/summer collection for 1984 was well received as it showed the wide range of his designs. This collection was typical of Ungaro, not only for the racerback styles but

Ungaro, Spring/Summer 1990

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Spring/summer 1990 brought a collection that was typical of Emanuel Ungaro. He was well known for his formfitting dresses and feminine themes, and the collection had a striking mixture of glamorous evening wear and pretty daywear, all accessorized. The House of Ungaro was significant on the fashion circuit, and respected for the high quality of craftsmanship inherent in its garments. In 1993 The Independent put Ungaro in the same sentence as Chanel and Yves Saint Laurent when talking about the “b

Ronaldus Shamask

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Mugler

Laura Snelgrove

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Pierre Balmain

Daphne Stylianou

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

1970s Style: Key Themes and Trends

Jo Turney

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The 1970s established fashion as performance, an element of cultures of display in which the street became catwalk (and vice versa), fusing fashion with media such as music, dance, film, and art. It was a decade of imagination and individuality, resulting from newfound social and personal freedoms (Tom Wolfe dubbed it the “Me” decade) which combined with a sartorial knowingness created a new confidence in the presentation of the self—anything was possible and the only limits were of one’s imagina

Yohji Yamamoto

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo 2011

Book chapter

Yamamoto and Kawakubo brought the beauty of poverty to the most glamorous stage of the world—the catwalks of Paris. In their 1981 joint collection, they paraded garments which symbolized neediness, destitution and hardship—clothing that appeared to have been picked up from rag-bags. They were entirely black in colour and irregular in shape, with oddly positioned pockets and fastenings. Their size appeared voluminous, as if the space between the external garment and the body had been exaggerated,

Fashion Designers, Seamstresses, and Tailors

Cynthia Amnéus

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Throughout the nineteenth century, North American fashion followed the dictates of French design. American dressmakers and tailors looked to Paris for the newest silhouettes and adapted them to the American lifestyle. It was not until the 1930s that independent fashion designers emerged and rejected the idea that all fashion must be inspired by Paris. These early designers created a unique “American look” that was predicated on comfort. This design tended to be more casual, with an air of sophist

Influence of North American Indian and First Nations Dress on Mainstream Fashion

Pamela C. Baker and Phyllis G. Tortora

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion designers of First Nations and North American Indian ancestry began to feel confident about being referred to as fashion designers only by the early 1970s. Fashion has not always been important to indigenous people, but telling a story has. Through their work these designers believe they are telling the story of their people; they are passionate about their work and especially passionate about how it supports their communities. The difference between North American aboriginal design and m

Fashion Cities

Christopher Breward

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The history of Western fashion is closely related to the history of urban life. As cultural geographer David Gilbert has claimed, this complex relationship underpins contemporary understandings of global fashion as a system orchestrated around a shifting network of world cities, particularly Paris, New York, London, Milan, and Tokyo but also incorporating (at various times) Moscow, Vienna, Berlin, São Paulo, Kuwait City, Cape Town, Barcelona, Antwerp, Delhi, Melbourne, Sydney, Shanghai, Hong Kong

France

Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The French Revolution abolished the rigid dress etiquette and bureaucracy of the ancien régime fashion industry. Napoleon’s campaigns inspired fashions with soldierly details and created a vogue for exotic accessories. His imperial court ensured the survival of French luxury goods industries, while promoting a more modern silhouette. Napoleon encouraged pre-Revolutionary tastes for classical Greek and Roman styles, to glorify his own reign. The restoration of the Bourbon monarchy and the Romantic

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