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Brand Identity and Protection

Fiona Armstrong-Gibbs and Tamsin McLaren

Source: Marketing Fashion Footwear. The Business of Shoes, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Fashion footwear is a complex industry where many variables converge to present brands with challenges that test their ability to become, and remain, credible. It is this credibility that is crucial for brands to survive, not just short term, but long term. And it is this credibility, in the eyes of the consumer, that allows brands to charge far in excess of production costs and overheads, and therefore yield greater profit.

Brand Management

Fiona Armstrong-Gibbs and Tamsin McLaren

Source: Marketing Fashion Footwear. The Business of Shoes, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Successful fashion footwear brands are not born overnight but rather evolve over time as a result of unique product, in-depth consumer research, carefully planned strategies and in many cases by capturing the spirit of the time, often by chance. This chapter explores how brands morph from “fad” brands into truly iconic brands by appealing to many different consumer types simultaneously.

Three: The King of Lifestyle Merchandising: Ralph Lauren

Joseph H. Hancock

Source: Brand Story. Cases and Explorations in Fashion Branding, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Ralph Lauren was born on October 14, 1939, the son of Russian Jewish immigrants. His real name was Ralph Lifshitz, but in his late teens, he and his brothers had their names changed to Lauren. He had a normal childhood, with a modest upbringing. He grew up in the Bronx and lived with his parents in a two-bedroom apartment. He shared a room with his brothers throughout his childhood and often wore their hand-me-down clothes. He became accustomed to the worn look of the garments and eventually enjo

Four: Fantastically Sexy!: Dolce & Gabbana

Joseph H. Hancock

Source: Brand Story. Cases and Explorations in Fashion Branding, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Domenico Dolce was born on September 13, 1958, in the Sicilian village of Polizzi, and his partner, Stefano Gabbana, was born on November 14, 1962, in Milan. They met in 1980 while working for the same design company and instantly had chemistry—for fashion and each other.“Dolce & Gabbana,” The Biography Channel, www.thebiographychannel.co.uk/biographies. For many years, Stefano Gabbana and Domenico Dolce were partners in both business and life. By literally spending day and night together, they w

Designing for different markets

Elinor Renfrew and Colin Renfrew

Source: Developing a Fashion Collection, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Haute couture is the highest, most specialist market level. Couture is preindustrial fashion based around privately commissioned ateliers (workshops) producing handmade, bespoke garments fitted to clients who appreciate the highest quality and utmost privacy. Established houses, such as Chanel, Givenchy, Dior, and more recently Gaultier, are members of the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture and show their couture collections in Paris over three days in January and July. Currently there are onl

Luxury

Jonathan Faiers

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Luxury and fashion today are increasingly uttered in the same breath, and while fashion certainly does not have to be luxurious, the term fashion adds a significance and meaning to everyday clothing that elevates it above its chief utilitarian functions of providing protection, warmth, and modesty. The combination luxury fashion, however, implies cost, exclusivity, indulgence, and excess, and is typically understood as being constructed from the finest materials, involving a high level of craftsm

Reel to Real Life: Re-Fashioning India from Bollywood to Street

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Cinema in India is an extremely influential cultural medium. India has the world’s largest film industry with over 1,000 films produced every year in more than 20 languagesIbid. and over 14 million Indians go to the movies on a daily basis.In 2008 the industry was valued at approximately US$2.2 billion, and expected to grow by 9 percent p.a. till 2015 (Deloitte 2011 report: “Media & Entertainment in India Digital Road Ahead.” www.deloitte.com/in [accessed June 4, 2013]) Many more watch them at ho

Ungaro, Fall/Winter 1999

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Ungaro’s fall/winter 1999 collection was a departure from the designs he had been known for in the 1980s and early 1990s. It had more of a hippie feel than his previous collections; however, it still had the luxury that was associated with the brand. Ungaro’s show was judged to have successfully achieved a balance between commerciality and the craft of the couturier.

Celebrities and Fashion Models: Endorsement and Promotion Agreements

Ted Max

Source: Fashion Law. A Guide for Designers, Fashion Executives, and Attorneys, 2nd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Fashion brands today rely heavily on campaigns featuring celebrities and famous models to augment the profile of their brands and bring attention to their latest fashion and accessory designs. The rise of social media, including Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and Pinterest has contributed to a heightened impact of celebrities and models as part of advertising and brand building by creating celebrity advocates with whom consumers affiliate and identify closely.Recent studies of advertising to Millenn

Branding

Virginia Grose

Source: Fashion Merchandising, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Customer behaviour can be unpredictable and it is difficult to make assumptions about who will buy fashion, but it is probably safe to assume that customers can be promiscuous about purchasing habits and highly sophisticated in terms of taste. Consumers today are more affluent, discerning, demanding, cosmopolitan, educated and time-pressured than ever before.

The Fashion Brand

Kaled K. Hameide

Source: Fashion Branding. Unraveled, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book part

Luxury Fashion Brands

Kaled K. Hameide

Source: Fashion Branding. Unraveled, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The term LUXURY is actually a relative one. What may be luxury to one person or one culture may not be so to another, and what used to be luxury in the past may not be so in the future— in fact, it may even be considered standard. Nevertheless, we all seem to share some common understanding of what luxury ought to be. Just mention the word “luxury” and a mental image is automatically triggered. A few descriptions pop into most people’s minds, such as expensive, creative, trendy, exclusive, high q

Mass-Market Fashion Brands

Kaled K. Hameide

Source: Fashion Branding. Unraveled, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

MASS-MARKET brands are ones that are mass produced. They range in price from low-priced budget brands to high-priced premium brands with mid-priced consumer brands in between. Mass-market fashion brands are generally fashion followers and not trendsetters. They may suffer from sameness, indistinguishable differences, or lack of creativity compared to luxury brands; thus, they are rarely positioned on creativity but on values derived from price, and convenience. Accordingly, these brands’ values u

iBRAND: The Age of Interactive, Wireless, and Virtual Brands

Kaled K. Hameide

Source: Fashion Branding. Unraveled, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Interactive branding refers to a situation whereby the consumer interacts directly with the brand or the process of creating and developing it. It is through the help of new technologies that it has become possible for consumers to play a direct and interactive role in shaping a brand as he or she likes. A good example of this trend is the concept of mass customization (or MC). In this chapter we focus on mass customization, explain the concept, give examples of various applications, and then exa

Customer Service Means Business

Ira Neimark

Source: The Rise of Fashion and Lessons Learned at Bergdorf Goodman, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

As I have mentioned before, salesmanship seems to be a lost art. All retailers bemoan the fact when a snowstorm, or other inclement weather, causes customers to stay home instead of shopping, it will ruin their sales. I am reminded of a wonderful retail story that I heard many years ago, so long ago that I may have the wrong names. However, whenever the weather turned bad for me, I thought about it.

Private Labeling and Product Development

Jay Diamond and Sheri Litt

Source: Retailing in the Twenty-First Century, 2nd Edition, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In most retail operations, be they brick-and-mortar, catalogues, or Web sites, the greatest proportion of the merchandise is produced by manufacturers. The products are not restricted to any one merchant, but sometimes their purchase comes with exclusivity terms for certain merchants. That is, the goods are restricted to specific retailers in a trading area.

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