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Yi National Minority

Stevan Harrell and Bamo Qubumo

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Numbering nearly eight million, the Yi national minority is the seventh largest minority in China. Also known as the Nuosu, they live mainly in the hillside and basin areas of Yunnan province, with significant populations in Sichuan and Guizhou provinces, and the Guangxi Autonomous Region. Among the Nuosu Yi people of the Liangshan region, in the mountains of southwestern Sichuan, clothing and decoration reflect social organization and cultural concepts, expressing aesthetic ideals of womanly bea

Wales

Elen Phillips

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Wales, one of the United Kingdom’s four constituent nations, is located on the western shores of the British Isles. Agriculture accounts for 80 percent of its land use. Sheep have always been the mainstay of the Welsh rural economy. The principal rural industry in Wales for centuries was woolen manufacture. Although the industry declined steadily for much of the nineteenth century, small woolen mills were once a common sight in the Welsh countryside. Welsh flannel made ideal clothing for everyday

The Textile Industry

Michiel Scheffer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The textile industry covers the sequence of production stages, starting from fibers through clothing assembly. Europe’s textile industry has been significant in both economic and cultural history. It was the first sector to industrialize and was therefore at the core of the pervasive economic and social changes that took place in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. For more than a century, the advantages of large-scale cloth production made West Europe a world leader in this trade, but since

Textile Arts of the Mapuche of Chile

Grace Johnson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The Mapuche, whose name means “people of the land,” still live close to the land and follow their traditions, which explains the survival of their culture and textiles. In pre-Hispanic times, they were nomadic fishermen and hunter-gatherers, clad in furs. After becoming farmers, they became skilled in weaving, basketry, and pottery. In the mid-fifteenth century, the powerful Inkas invaded Chile. Although unable to conquer the Mapuche, Inka influence on Mapuche culture was considerable. Among othe

Pre-Hispanic Northern Peru

Amy Oakland

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Although rare in most parts of the world, objects of a usually perishable nature including wood, feathers, plant materials, and ancient textiles have been preserved from early periods along the desert Pacific Coast of South America, a region extending from central Peru to northern Chile. Periodic rainfall on the north coast of Peru and seasonal rain in the highland regions have destroyed most ancient fabric there, but contact between regions has assured the preservation of highland cloth on the c

Morrales in Guatemala

Kathryn Rousso

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

As in many regions of the world, the indigenous people of Guatemala devised ways to make baskets and bags from local materials to carry and contain objects. One of these is called the morral (net bag), and it is still used by villagers living in rugged mountainous terrain where walking long distances is part of life. Their traje (traditional clothing) does not have pockets, and morrales are necessary to carry food, tools, clothing, and other items needed in the fields or market or on the journey.

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