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Superheroes and the fashion of being unfashionable

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction 2016

Book chapter

Those superhero costumes that remain most static over time are largely symbolic. When costumes are utilitarian, as with Iron Man (character)Iron Man’s suit, extreme transformation is justifiable as a technological development. By contrast, the costumes of Superman (character)Superman and Wonder WomanWonder Woman, which do little to enhance their performance, remain relatively consistent. Such garments function through stylistic or, following Barthes, RolandBarthes, linguistic expression, more tha

Superhero cosplay

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction 2016

Book chapter

re-enactmentThe notion of a fan has moved beyond “older ideas of media spectatorship” that involve little more than direct consumption of a cultural artifact (Flemming, 2007, p. 16). participatory fandomParticipatory fandom involves tangential activities which expand upon the fictional world and blur boundaries with reality. “Fans create a fan culture with its own systems of production and distribution that forms . . . a ‘shadow cultural economy’ that lies outside that of the cultural industries

Manolo Blahnik

Rio Ali

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Katharine Hamnett

Amber Jane Butchart

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Sophia Kokosalaki

Amber Jane Butchart

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Gloves ‘of the Very Thin Sort’: Gifting Limerick Gloves in the Late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries

Liza Foley

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

Although leather was essential for the production of a wide range of eighteenth-century objects, including gloves, very little consideration has been given to the significance of the materiality of leather itself. As historian Giorgio Riello has shown, leather was a scarce material in pre-Industrial England. ‘Confined to the natural world and to a stable cattle asset’ (2008: 77), its production largely depended on the meat market, which, in the case of sheep, and to a greater extent cattle, accou

Junya Watanabe

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Monique Lhuillier

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Vintage Style and Mediated Memories: Sixties DIY

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture 2015

Book chapter

original clothes from the sixtiesIn spite of the importance attributed to old, original second-hand clothes, it is not the case that all clothes worn by sixties stylers are actual survivors from the 1960s. A restriction to old clothes would lead to a rather reduced wardrobe, since not all clothes desired are available any longer—or may have ever existed in the past. The rarityrarity of old clothes that fit with the current tastetastes and contemporary interest in sixties style makes it essential

Fashion and Anthropology

Brent Luvaas

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Anthropologists have largely shied away from the study of fashion, preferring to focus their attention to dress on those everyday items that define an individual as part of an enduring cultural tradition. Only in the last two decades, as anthropologists have shifted their attention to global processes, have they begun to look at fashion specifically as a site of critical enquiry. As they do so, they bring with them a disciplinary attention to the messy and contradictory lived experiences that mak

Florals

Tessa Maffucci

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Floral designs are ubiquitous in fashion. They appear reliably with each new season, spring or fall, as designers attempt to find new ways to iterate this now traditional motif. The history of floral textiles is complex. Flower designs have been intimately tied up with colonialism and the convergence of cultures of dress; however, the patterns themselves are often seen in simplistic terms as signifying femininity or pastoral innocence. Florals can translate the beauty of the natural world onto th

A Stylish History of Jazz: 1900–1960

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

jazzorigins ofNew Orleansslave performancesBechet, Sidneyon slave performances/New Orleansartinfluence of AfricanAfrican ritualsAfrican art/dressDecades before the Civil War, a gathering of inspired people seeking self-determination initiated the birth of a musical genre that flourished throughout America. Congo SquareCongo Square in New Orleans, Louisiana is the highly renowned ground where slaves gathered for spiritual communion on free Sunday. By 1800, these assemblies swelled to six hundred i

Ribbons and Lace: Girls, Decorative Femininity and Androgyny

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

‘There’s one thing about you,’ Maudie said. ‘You always look ladylike.’JeanRhys, Voyage in the Dark (London: Penguin Books, 2000 [1934]), p. 10. ‘Oh God,’ I said, ‘who wants to look ladylike?’

Missoni

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Radical Shoemaking and Dress Reform From Fabians To Feminists

Annebella Pollen

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

The sandal-wearing, vegetarian ‘crank’ that Orwell referred to so disparagingly in the 1930s remains a stock figure of ridicule in the present; ‘sandal-wearing’ along with ‘muesli-eating’ and ‘Guardian newspaper-reading’ have become standard accusatory descriptors in British conservative journalism for those perceived to be of a certain liberal disposition. In the interwar period, Orwell’s invective was specifically prompted by a trip to Letchworth Garden City; the ‘simple-lifers’ that he encount

Book chapter

It is widely acknowledged that fashion is modern. If one adopts David Frisby’s definition of modernité as ‘the more general experience of the aestheticization of everyday life, as exemplified in the transitory qualities of an urban culture shaped by the imperatives of fashion, consumerism, and constant innovation,’ fashion is proto-typically modern. (Stewart 2008: xii)

Ronaldus Shamask

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Laura Biagiotti

Laura Snelgrove

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Knitwear in Fashion from 1970

Jo Turney

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Knitwear has a history almost as long as clothing and therefore is a familiar aspect of dress. Most frequently, knitted clothing is associated with women’s creative domestic practice, as it has been associated with thriftiness, philanthropy, and making do, especially during wartime, and thus seems to exist or be understood as outside of the dynamic world of fashion. Yet, most catwalk collections include some knitwear, and it is central to notions of fashion, embracing the Zeitgeist in relation to

Introduction

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

When Western clothing began to reveal the shape of the body in the twelfth century, cloth needed to be cut into shapes and the shapes became more complex in each century, thus requiring guides or patterns to form appropriate shapes to fit the body. The paper pattern ultimately became that guide; however, as Frieda Sorber observed in the exhibition catalog Patterns from the MoMu in Antwerp, “The history of the paper pattern is almost as elusive as the ephemeral nature of the object itself” (Heaven

Tailoring and the Birth of the Published Paper Pattern

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

Any method more simple or rudimentary than this one published by “A Society of Adepts” can scarcely be conceived. It is really the result of experience and differed scarcely but in name from the plan of cutting by “rock of eye.” It must be regarded as proof that a desire or necessity was felt for some method by which tailors could draft these patterns from measures. In default of any other guide, this work may have been of some assistance to the cutters of that time; otherwise it is remarkable t

Development of Dressmaking Patterns: 1800–1860

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

Through the eighteenth century, methods for communicating the latest fashions were limited to word of mouth, fashion dolls known as Pandoras, fashion plates such as Galerie des Modes, and publications for professional tailors.

Nineteenth-century Technology

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

Inventors were experimenting with mechanical sewing by the mid-eighteenth century, but it was not until the mid-nineteenth century that a functioning, practical machine was invented by Barthélemy Thimonnier. In “A Brief History of the Sewing Machine,” Graham Forsdyke explains that Thimonnier’s machine was granted a French patent in 1830. By 1840, he had installed eighty of his machines in his factory for sewing uniforms for the French army. Parisian tailors, who feared the machine would put craft

Early History of Pattern Companies: 1860s–1880s

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

Demorest, the first to mass-produce retail patterns for the home sewer in the United States, took advantage of the expanded postal services selling by mail order as well as in retail outlets. Who the actual designer of the first patterns was is somewhat unclear. Mrs. Margaret Demorest (née Poole) is listed as Mme Demorest in Leslie’s Lady’s Gazette of Fashion in July 1854. However, it is believed that William Jennings Demorest employed Ellen Louise Curtis and her sister Kate from the early 1850s

New Markets and Expansion: 1880s–1900

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

By 1880, the six major U.S. pattern companies—Demorest, Butterick, McCall, Harper’s Bazar, Taylor, and Domestic—had positioned themselves in the market. Each published a magazine advertising their patterns for the latest fashions for women, a full complement of children’s clothing, undergarments for all, and shirts, trousers, and various other men’s non-tailored garments.

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