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Preparing for a Test Shoot

Shannon Burns-Tran and Jenny B. Davis

Source: Style Wise. A Practical Guide to Becoming a Fashion Stylist, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter you will learn:

Locating Sources in Foreign Markets

Richard Clodfelter

Source: Retail Buying. From Basics to Fashion, 6th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Making the decision to import purchases from foreign sources requires that you prepare yourself for entering the global marketplace. Learn as much as you can about the people,brands generics,merchandise,merchandise quality of,global marketplace choosing the right sources,identifying reasons to buy from,buying,benefits of foreign sources,the culture, and the retailing practices of any country that you are considering as a foreign source. Possibly even learn a new language or at least a few key phr

The Design Process

Martin M. Pegler and Anne Kong

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 7th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

one-off design brief, alternative approach todocumentation included in design briefdesign briefdocumentation included inbalancedefinedbriefdesign concepts ofdirective forThe design design concepts ofprocess forprocess typically begins with a document known as a design processdesign directivedesign directive, which is also called a brief or deckdeck. The directive provides a comprehensive review of the proposed initiative. It can originate internally within the company or externally with a contrac

Footwear Design, Construction, and Production

Fiona Armstrong-Gibbs and Tamsin McLaren

Source: Marketing Fashion Footwear. The Business of Shoes, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Footwear production is costly and time consuming. Historically, shoes would have been made in the country where they were destined to be sold to the end consumer, where footwear “brands” were signs of good quality and durability rather than style statements. However, in recent times the inevitable and unstoppable development of offshore production, speed of change in fashion, and consumer requirements have meant that the location of footwear production has changed dramatically.

The Global Footwear Trade

Fiona Armstrong-Gibbs and Tamsin McLaren

Source: Marketing Fashion Footwear. The Business of Shoes, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Over the past twenty years, the developed world has rapidly increased its consumption of footwear. In order to fulfill Western appetites for more fashion at a cheaper price, this demand led to sourcing further afield to countries in the developing world. Footwear is not a straightforward product to make; it is labor intensive, and where there are large pools of willing workers, its production will thrive. Today’s sourcing strategies coupled with the rapid growth of consumerism through the retail

Mannequins and Mannequin Alternatives

Judy Bell and Kate Ternus

Source: Silent Selling. Best Practices and Effective Strategies in Visual Merchandising, 5th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The mannequin is regarded as one of the fashion retailer’s most powerful communication tools. Used strategically, it speaks volumes about fashion trends and a store’s brand identity. We know that in order to communicate effectively, a store mannequin must relate to a shopper’s self-image. When shoppers follow current fashion—read about it, talk about it, look at it, buy it, and wear it—they are defining self and describing who they are through the clothing they wear. In fact, more than one indust

Step 2: Macro Environmental Analysis

Jung E. Ha-Brookshire

Source: Global Sourcing in the Textile and Apparel Industry, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

While new products are being developed, sourcing personnel take all the information on new products and start to select the most appropriate supplier to produce and deliver the products for the company. In particular, if sourcing personnel are looking into new countries as sourcing destinations, macro environmental analysis must be performed to see if entering a new country would be feasible for any given sourcing project. This chapter discusses the second stage of the seven core steps of global

Step 3: Micro-Level Supplier Analysis

Jung E. Ha-Brookshire

Source: Global Sourcing in the Textile and Apparel Industry, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Through PESTS (political, economic, social, technological, and sustainability environments) analysis, a sourcer narrows the choices of countries for a specific sourcing project. After this step, a sourcer looks into specific factories within these countries, and compares each factory’s advantages and disadvantages as a potential supplier. This chapter discusses the third stage of the seven core steps of global sourcing—micro-level analysis for supplier selection (see Figure 7.1).

Step 4: Purchase Order and Methods of Payment

Jung E. Ha-Brookshire

Source: Global Sourcing in the Textile and Apparel Industry, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Once initial costs are estimated and the supplier is selected, sourcers then create a purchase order, a legal sales contract. A purchase order stipulates what has been agreed between the supplier and the sourcer, including social and environmental compliance conditions, product details, quantity, price, delivery date and method, packing instruction, quality assurance policies, and so on. Methods of payment are also negotiated at this stage. Some methods of payment require a purchase order as a re

Step 5: Preproduction, Production, and Quality Assurance

Jung E. Ha-Brookshire

Source: Global Sourcing in the Textile and Apparel Industry, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Upon completion of the purchase order, the supplier starts preparing raw materials and production techniques for main production. If the letter of credit is an agreed-on method of payment, the sourcer opens a letter of credit to the supplier through the bank. The supplier then can use that guarantee of payment by the issuing bank to finance raw material purchases or production, labor costs, and other expenses. Most sourcers in today’s marketplace are heavily involved in preproduction stages with

Step 6: Logistics and Importing Processes

Jung E. Ha-Brookshire

Source: Global Sourcing in the Textile and Apparel Industry, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Once production is complete and goods are shipped, sourcing personnel work with the import and/or logistics department to legally import foreign goods into the sourcer’s country. Logistics has been of increasing importance in recent years as sustainability efforts have increased. Shipping’s impact on climate change, air quality, noise, and waste has been criticized and “greener” (or environmentally friendly) logistics options have been suggested by many logistics companies. In addition, each coun

Step 7: Sourcing Performance Evaluation

Jung E. Ha-Brookshire

Source: Global Sourcing in the Textile and Apparel Industry, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A sourcer’s main responsibilities are fulfilled when finished goods are legally entered into the sourcer’s country and arranging for physical distribution. At the end of each sourcing project, sourcers must evaluate their performance and make suggestions to better future sourcing projects. The results of a sourcing evaluation can directly affect new product development, completing the circle of the whole global sourcing process. Typically, most business activities are examined from the cost and p

Current and Future Global Sourcing

Jung E. Ha-Brookshire

Source: Global Sourcing in the Textile and Apparel Industry, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Port, customs, and logistics issues are another macroeconomic situation with which today’s sourcing executives are concerned (Pious & Burns, 2015). This concern reflects recent port and logistics disruptions as a result of several truck drivers’ and port-workers’ strikes since 2013 in the United States. In 2015, 20,000 or more union workers of Pacific Maritime Association went on a labor strike, causing a suspension of the loading and unloading of containers and other cargo ships for almost a wee

Introduction to Global Sourcing

Jung E. Ha-Brookshire

Source: Global Sourcing in the Textile and Apparel Industry, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

With a clear understanding of global sourcing and supply chain, this section goes deep into global sourcing in the textile and apparel supply chain. As discussed previously, there are various members in the global textile and apparel supply chain. Figure 1.4 illustrates the interconnected relationships among various supply chain members in the global textile and apparel industry. More specifically, the ultimate suppliers in the upstream of the textile and apparel supply chain would be fiber produ

Theoretical Perspective of Global Sourcing

Jung E. Ha-Brookshire

Source: Global Sourcing in the Textile and Apparel Industry, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The five key theories are discussed to explain international trade: (1) the law of supply and demand in international trade, (2) comparative advantage theory, (3) competitive advantage theory of nations, (4) fragmentation theory, and (5) industry life cycle theory.

Trends in Global Sourcing

Jung E. Ha-Brookshire

Source: Global Sourcing in the Textile and Apparel Industry, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Global sourcing has fundamentally changed the nature of the global textile and apparel industry. Today, the world exports over US$800 billion worth of textiles and apparel annually (World Trade Organization [WTO], 2015). China has been the leading exporter of textiles during the 2000s and 2010s, with its export shares rising from 4.6 percent in 1980 to over 35 percent in recent years. The 28 member countries of the European Union (EU-28) collectively accounted for 36.7 percent of exports in 2000,

Global Sourcing Options

Jung E. Ha-Brookshire

Source: Global Sourcing in the Textile and Apparel Industry, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Chapter 1 explained global sourcing as a set of business processes and activities by which businesses acquire and deliver components or fully finished products or services from outside the organization. A decision on sourcing or global sourcing is directly related to a company’s strategic decision on whether to “make or buy.” Make in this context means that a company produces parts or products on its own. Buy refers to sourcing parts or products from other organizations. Many factors must be cons

Step 1: New Product Development

Jung E. Ha-Brookshire

Source: Global Sourcing in the Textile and Apparel Industry, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Sourcing personnel have a variety of responsibilities throughout the global supply chain. As discussed in Chapter 1, the objective of sourcing is centered on acquisition and delivery of parts or finished products and, therefore, sourcing personnel are mainly responsible for business activities related to finding and attaining the parts or products, and delivering such products to the right places at the right times. In addition to these core sourcing activities, sourcing personnel, as members of

Garment Styling

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“I wish I had invented blue jeans. They have expression, modesty, sex appeal, simplicity—all I hope for in my clothes.”

The Role of Sourcing

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“Every time you spend money, you are casting a vote for the kind of world you want.”

Brazil

Silvio Abrahao Laban Neto, Jaya Halepete, Luciana de Araujo Gil, Youssef Youssef, Flavia Silveira Cardoso and Wlamir Xavier

Source: Retailing In Emerging Markets, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Brazilemerging marketsBrazilAfter reading this chapter, you will

Suppliers, Sourcing, and Communication

David Shaw and Dimitri Koumbis

Source: Fashion Buying. From Trend Forecasting to Shop Floor, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The fashion designer<>buyer relationship is very close—however, it is ultimately the buyer who makes the final decisions and takes responsibility for putting products into the range.

Global Sourcing and Merchandising

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: In Fashion, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As the popular children’s poem states, “To market, to market, to buy a fat pig; home again, home again, jiggety jig.” Going to market can be an exciting and different experience, whether it is going to buy food, candy, sporting goods, or clothes. Most of us go to market with great expectations and plans, and once home, sometimes the purchase is perfect and other times it is just not right.

Design with smart textiles

Sarah Kettley

Source: Designing with Smart Textiles, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Our possibly utopian hope is that e-textile design can, over time, become a means through which hobbyists, craftspeople . . . and children can become technologically fluent—and can express themselves creatively.

What is a collection?

Elinor Renfrew and Colin Renfrew

Source: Developing a Fashion Collection, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Any successful or financially viable collection requires an enormous amount of research, investigation, and planning. Successful designers, manufacturers, and retailers have a clear understanding of their customers’ needs, as well as an understanding of their position in a highly competitive market. In addition to the creation and realization of any collection, designers need to consider a range of issues if the final garments are to hang in customers’ closets.

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