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Michael Kors

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Walter Van Beirendonck

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Nino Cerruti

Giulia Bussinello

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Alberta Ferretti

Giulia Bussinello

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Pam Hogg

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Helen Storey

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Kenzo Takada

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Paul Smith

Casey Mackenzie Johnson

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Sonia Rykiel

Morna Laing

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Dries Van Noten

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Mark Eisen

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Paris

Alexis Romano

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Paris was a fashion city from the mid-nineteenth century, when the French fashion system began to function outside of medieval guilds, corporations, and the royal courts. The article first discusses the establishment of haute couture, and explores trade syndicates, the Sentier garment district, department stores, and expositions. A second section focuses on the twentieth century and the couturiers and designers who worked in Paris, and also questions the construction of Paris in the fashion media

Alexander McQueen

Aimee Scott

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Max Azria

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Hijab on the Shop Floor: Muslims in Fashion Retail in Britain

Reina Lewis

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

UK employment law has shifted in recent years from equal opportunities legislation which outlawed discrimination on the grounds of race and ethnicity to new policies concerned more broadly with diversity. In 2003, the UK Employment Equality (Religion or Belief) Regulations brought the United Kingdom in line with the European Employment Equality Directive of 2000, extending legal protection to cover discrimination ‘on the grounds of perceived as well as actual religion or belief’.

Rei Kawakubo and Comme des Garçons

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo 2011

Book chapter

Vera Mackie (2003: 144)… women [in Japan] were condemned to be ‘mothers’ or ‘whores’.

Garments, International Trade in

Teri Agins

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

North American Influences on West European Dress

Rebecca Arnold

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

North America’s effect on West European fashion is often viewed only in relation to Hollywood and celebrity. However, its influence has been far more diverse, from technological inventions to leisure wear and the professionalization of the industry.

Liberty & Co.

Sonia Ashmore

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Liberty’s early catalogs, published from 1881, featured silks remarkable for their variety of color, print, and weight. By the 1880s Liberty’s name had become a trademark. “Liberty Art Fabrics” were sensuous and subtly colored, widely admired and imitated. Fashionable aniline dyes were rejected in favor of natural colorings; lack of chemical adulteration, antiquity of design, and irregularity of weave, indicating hand production, were also emphasized.

Mannequins

Jane Audas

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

It was Paris that defined fashion from the mid-nineteenth until the mid-twentieth century, and the French mannequin manufacturers were able to exploit this reputation. Not only were French mannequins technologically advanced—fueled by the investment in shops and display in France—but notions of what was fashionable at any one point were centered on France, so French mannequins were considered the apex of fashion. Their new designs were also regularly exhibited at the international expositions, wi

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Children’s Wear in Australia

Michelle Bakar and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Sydney department store mail order catalogs and clothing advertisements from the late nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries provide information regarding clothing available for Australian children. However, they refer mainly to the relatively affluent middle class. Australian life was often more informal than North American or British life; the climate necessitated practical styles. Turn-of-the-century catalogs assumed that English tastes would appeal to Australians and that mothers primarily

Fashion Cities

Christopher Breward

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The history of Western fashion is closely related to the history of urban life. As cultural geographer David Gilbert has claimed, this complex relationship underpins contemporary understandings of global fashion as a system orchestrated around a shifting network of world cities, particularly Paris, New York, London, Milan, and Tokyo but also incorporating (at various times) Moscow, Vienna, Berlin, São Paulo, Kuwait City, Cape Town, Barcelona, Antwerp, Delhi, Melbourne, Sydney, Shanghai, Hong Kong

Dress and Tourism

Derek Bryce

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Tourism is an industry of increasing global significance. With international tourist arrivals forecast to exceed 1.5 billion by 2020, it is clear that catering to such vast temporary movements of people has significant impacts on host environments and cultures. In broad terms, this industry is systemically driven to commodify entire cultures in order to render them consumable by large numbers of potential tourists. Perhaps paradoxically, the supposed cultural novelty and exoticism of a destinatio

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