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Markus Lupfer

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Alberta Ferretti

Giulia Bussinello

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Branding and Logos

Jennifer Grayer Moore

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Making the brand name or logo of a company a visible and often dominant design feature in a piece of apparel or on an accessory became a defining feature in fashion in the latter part of the twentieth century, especially from 1970 onward. Icons, initials, full names of designers or design houses, and often a combination of two of the aforementioned were woven, printed, embroidered, stamped, and engraved into every conceivable type of material, sometimes as a single motif and often in endless repe

The Handbag from the 1970s to 2000

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The need to collect, carry, and contain one’s belongings has existed for as long as humanity. From sacks to hold prehistoric flint and pouches for early coins to purses with contemporary cosmetics, various types of handbags have appeared in art and writing throughout history. While always fulfilling a practical function, handbags have also evolved with changing needs. They can be signifiers of fashion, social status, and even psychological state, as they mediate the boundaries between interior an

Céline

Laura Snelgrove

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Ralph Lauren

Daphne Stylianou

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Designers and Models Become Brands

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

In 1921, Gabrielle ‘Coco’ Chanel launched one of the most successful scents of all time (Groom 1997: 21). The iconic oblong bottle for Chanel No. 5, still revered, was carefully designed to her own very strict specifications, and she selected its contents from several versions created by parfumier Ernest Béaux (Charles-Roux 2009). Meanwhile, once established as a designer, she herself also became a fashion leader; she was constantly photographed and always mindful of publicity, whether it was in

Film Stars as Fashion Icons

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Cinema’s new ‘celebrity’ stardom, within a Western context, is qualitatively different from previous forms of fandom or star emulation. In consequence, the existing theories of stardom (Stacey 1994; Gledhill 1991), sometimes co-opted from film studies to explain modern celebrity culture, are not really sufficient, although, as this book will suggest, Richard Dyer’s idea of ‘the ordinary’ has a new relevance in this rather different context (1978/1998). Film studies within the academy must somehow

Changes in Cinematic Culture: Some Celebrity Cover Girls

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Some of the films made by the new celebrity stars may not actually be seen by their fans; they will, however, have seen stills in magazines or on the Internet. When their films are commercially successful, the image of the star seen on screen often matches their most popular off-screen image. Jennifer Aniston in Marley and Me, made in 2009 and more successful at the box office than her previous string of romantic comedies, looks exactly like the off-screen Jennifer Aniston, so often photographed

Music and Fashion Forge Links

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Janice Miller’s recent book Music and Fashion (2011) is a fascinating and long-overdue study of the relationship outlined in the title. What is interesting is that no one had formerly set out to explore the subject in depth, apart from the odd article here and there (see Miller 2011; McLaughlin 2000, 2011) and Stan Hawkins, who focuses in his book upon masculinity and the British pop dandy (2009). Not all of the musicians Miller discusses in her text could be called celebrities; in fact, many of

DIY Chic: Notes on Indie Style

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

Be an original in a land full of fakes and duplicates.

Rei Kawakubo and Comme des Garçons

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo 2011

Book chapter

Vera Mackie (2003: 144)… women [in Japan] were condemned to be ‘mothers’ or ‘whores’.

Branding, Fashion and Music

Janice Miller

Source: Fashion and Music 2011

Book chapter

A kind of special status for creative people is part of a set of characteristics constructed in the nineteenth century by the writers, poets, composers and painters that Raymond Williams (1971) labels the ‘Romantic Artists’. Williams argues that a certain mystique and an almost stereotypical artistic personality were created by and around sets of individuals as a method of resistance to encroaching industrialization.

Clothes and Cultural Identities: Music, Ethnicity and Nation

Janice Miller

Source: Fashion and Music 2011

Book chapter

Martin Stokes contends that music has provided a means by which individuals and communities come to understand themselves in relation to other groups with whom they contrast themselves, thus establishing the ‘difference between’. Therefore, he argues that ‘music is socially meaningful not entirely, but largely because it provides means by which people recognise identities and places and the boundaries which separate them’ (Stokes 1994: 5).

Diverting Denim: Screening Jeans in Bollywood

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Global Denim 2011

Book chapter

During a research visit to Bombay in 2008, I asked a young costume assistant, as we sat talking in a suburban Bombay coffee house, how often she had sourced jeans for films. She replied: ‘Denim is big in films. Our actors are wearing denim throughout the film. They have to have jeans, unless they are wearing a suit. I cannot think of a film where we haven’t used jeans, even actresses.’

Fashion Designers, Seamstresses, and Tailors

Cynthia Amnéus

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Throughout the nineteenth century, North American fashion followed the dictates of French design. American dressmakers and tailors looked to Paris for the newest silhouettes and adapted them to the American lifestyle. It was not until the 1930s that independent fashion designers emerged and rejected the idea that all fashion must be inspired by Paris. These early designers created a unique “American look” that was predicated on comfort. This design tended to be more casual, with an air of sophist

Children’s Wear in Australia

Michelle Bakar and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Sydney department store mail order catalogs and clothing advertisements from the late nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries provide information regarding clothing available for Australian children. However, they refer mainly to the relatively affluent middle class. Australian life was often more informal than North American or British life; the climate necessitated practical styles. Turn-of-the-century catalogs assumed that English tastes would appeal to Australians and that mothers primarily

Fashion and the Garment Industry in South Asia

Vandana Bhandari

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion in South Asia is shaped by varying influences; defining this phenomenon in such a diverse region is challenging. In India, particularly, people coexist at opposite ends of the economic spectrum. While economic reform and social changes have affected the upper and middle classes, the rural people and migrant poor appear almost completely left behind. Fashion, accommodating this diversity, exhibits hugely varied styles. Throughout history, traders, travelers, migrants, and invaders have con

Fake Branded Clothing in Post-Socialist Romania

Magdalena Craciun

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fake branded clothes, mostly of foreign origin, ranging from cheap versions to high-quality copies and seconds of originals with imperceptible defects, can easily be found in Romania in open-air markets or well-established shops, in shop windows or “under the counter,” and in many people’s wardrobes. Behind such goods, there are various interconnected phenomena—for example, an informal economy, opportunities, compromises, and constraints in post-Socialist consumption, as well as the increasing so

Display Mannequins

Leopoldina Fortunati

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Although the dress mannequin is usually considered marginal within the marketing and displaying of fashionable clothing, it can be analyzed as a key cultural artifact in the fashion system. The display mannequin is part of an archaic imagery of humankind, similar to automatons, robots, and dolls. At a metaphoric level, it has an importance in Western culture, because on a symbolic plane the mannequin replaces the human being. In fashion, the mannequin engages in the dialogue between the container

Influence of the Web

Leopoldina Fortunati and Manuela Farinos

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Web 2.0 platforms have deeply changed fashion communication. Online forums and, later, blogs and social networks have become increasingly common and have achieved a pivotal role in driving new fashion trends. They represent a possibility for ordinary people to participate in the fashion scene; share their suggestions, opinions, and comments; and thus contribute to the construction of new fashion discoursivity. Whereas scholars have focused on fashion bloggers, there is little research on the anti

Conventional Work Dress

Colleen Gau

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Historically, climate and work environments are primary to the selection and production of work clothing, but safety concerns, economic and business climates, fashion, and ethics find a place in the clothing narrative of Western civilizations. As crops and animals were domesticated, empires emerged in the Nile and Mediterranean regions, and the classification of skill groups became more distinct. Animal skins were replaced by woven garments by the time people had settled into communities. Herding

Pants, Trousers

Joseph H. Hancock and Edward Augustyn

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Pants, sometimes referred to as trousers, knickers, khakis, slacks, and various other names, have been worn by many and have influenced almost everyone’s lives. Few studies actually recognize both the historical and cultural significance of pants. Some of the most recent works include such books as Richard Martin’s (1999) photographic essay Khaki, Cut from the Original Cloth and Laurence Benaïm’s Pants: A History Afoot, which traces the history of pants from 550 b.c.e. to the early twenty-first c

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