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Dsquared2

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Camouflage on the Catwalk

Ariel Beaujot

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The camouflage pattern that is so ubiquitous in Western clothing styles was developed to hide machinery during World War I; it only became a pattern for clothing for troops in World War II. “Camo” is key for war because it helps items blend into the background and it disrupts the shape of forms. Largely because of Army Surplus Stores, camo became a pattern used in street fashion in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. The meaning of camo in this period varied from antiwar protest to a reconnection with n

Alexander McQueen’s “Bumster” Trousers

Kate Bethune

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Alexander McQueen’s “Bumster” trousers caused a sensation as one of the most provocative designs of the 1990s. McQueen redefined the silhouette with the Bumsters by cutting the waistband two inches below that of hipster trousers to elongate the torso and expose the lower spine and top of the buttocks. Although a prototype pair was made in late 1992, Bumsters first appeared on the catwalk in McQueen’s inaugural show, “Nihilism” (spring/summer 1994). Reappearing in collections including the controv

Makeup on the Catwalk from the 1970s to 2000

Geraldine Biddle-Perry

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This article is an exploratory history within a history of the catwalk since the 1970s. It examines the centrality of makeup to shifting systems and structures of catwalk performance and spectacle, but it is not a trend-by-trend analysis of cosmetic practices and products. Rather, the aim is to examine catwalk makeup as a generative force within the wider transformation of fashion image as commodity and cultural form in the latter decades of the twentieth century.

Fashion Journalism and the Catwalk

Julie Bradford

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The second half of the twentieth century may go down as a golden age for the fashion press covering the collections. As ready-to-wear shows multiplied and fashion became part of popular culture—but before live-streaming and social media meant that everyone could see collections instantly—journalists were in a uniquely privileged position to convey news of this exciting new world to a burgeoning audience. This article will investigate how integral the press was to the development of fashion shows

Striptease

Barbara Brownie

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Striptease is a public performance of the otherwise private act of undressing. It is characterized by its emphasis on clothes, rather than the body beneath. As a demonstration of transformation, striptease highlights the capacity for clothes to conceal and reveal what lies beneath, be it a naked body or another layer of cloth. Catwalk shows make regular use of elements of striptease, layering garments so that ensembles can be revealed piece by piece. More overt references to erotic striptease are

Christian Dior Haute Couture by John Galliano, Fall/Winter 1997–1998

Waleria Dorogova

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Following his enthusiastically celebrated debut at Dior, for his second couture collection, John Galliano staged another highly theatricalized défilé in the notoriously gallant environment of the Jardin de Bagatelle. It was the first set design in a series commissioned from Michael Howells, who created complementing backdrops for Galliano’s garments and scenography. Aesthetical measures established in the first show for spring—traditional visual codes and the sartorial heritage of Christian Dior,

Michiko Koshino

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Red or Dead, Spring/Summer 1996

Jenny Evans

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Red or Dead’s “New York Dolls” collection caused outrage in the British tabloid press. The Mail on Sunday described the show as the “sick face of British fashion” after models brandished bloodied knives, knitting needles, and scissors. The clothing was almost overshadowed by the show’s melodramatic kitsch depiction of a dystopian future inhabited by “disturbed housewives.” While the emergence of “Cool Britannia” was attracting positive global attention, Wayne and Geraldine Hemingway, Red or Dead’

Kansai Yamamoto

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Couture Shows of the 2000s

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Haute couture’s economic feasibility remained questionable throughout the 2000s, though ateliers were supported by increased patronage from Chinese, Indian, Middle Eastern and Russian clients. Hundreds of petites mains shut down their businesses, while a minority were purchased by houses. Several labels conceded their haute couture memberships; however, the Chambre Syndicale also inducted a handful of new houses and welcomed Armani Privé as a “corresponding member.” Prospective couturiers could m

Chanel Haute Couture, Karl Lagerfeld, Spring/Summer 1994

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This collection was shown in Paris beneath the Louvre in the newly renovated Carrousel underground complex, the first time a fashion show had been organized underground. The collection attracted controversy because of three dresses printed with Arabic writing. When clerics in Indonesia protested, Lagerfeld apologized, destroyed the dresses, and asked journalists and photographers not to publish photos of them. The mannequins in this show were not just top models, but celebrities and actresses. Th

The Impact of Foreign Fashion Brands

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity 2015

Book chapter

What is a fashion industry? The way Welters and Lillethun (2001: xxix) describe it, a fashion industry requires several components such as: a market economy that provides wealth; adequate technology to make apparelapparel items; a distribution system that disseminates ideas about fashion as well as the products themselves; and a system democratizationof fashionof fashion innovation and adoption. Also, they say, a fashion industry is dependent on a rapidly changing infrastructure influenced by art

Photography in Fashion Advertising since 1970

Paul Jobling

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Photography began to make inroads into advertising—including fashion publicity—by the start of the twentieth century following the evolution of the halftone process in the 1880s. By the 1930s the shift toward photographic methods became more pronounced in advertising, though in fashion publicity line illustrations remained the preferred medium. These could be reproduced more easily (especially when it came to color) but also, given that the visual quality of halftones on newsprint could be somewh

Wendy Dagworthy

Michelle Labrague

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

New Generation

Michelle Labrague

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Raf Simons

Michelle Labrague

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Photographing Street Style: Bill Cunningham and Beyond

Brent Luvaas

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Whether started by New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham, or extending much further back, street-style photography has become an increasingly influential medium within the global fashion industry, with hundreds of bloggers now documenting the real-time trends of “real people” throughout the globe. But as the breadth and influence of street style grew between the 1970s and the mid-2000s, its practitioners stuck steadfastly to a set of common photographic conventions, investing street style w

Ethnicity and the Catwalk

Melissa Marra-Alvarez

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Fashion models possess an enduring appeal that impacts on both the world of fashion and society in general. Consequently, the lack of diversity on the catwalk in recent years has come to the fore of popular conscience. Some fashion scholars have argued that modeling practices may serve to shape our understanding and ways of seeing identity, including those based on ethnicity. Focusing on the latter half of the twentieth century, the emergence of “ethnic” models in fashion is described, examining

Assessing Elitism and Branding in Jazz

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

societal opposition, to jazzNew Orleansand jazzEarly on, jazz experienced modes of disdain, streaming from religious institutions, black societies and majority tradition. This conflict commenced with the intersection of gospel and secular musicsecular music. The latter was associated with music performed in saloons, nightclubs and theaters. Around the early 1900s, Du Bois, W. E. B.Du Bois explained the magnitude of segregationand the churchthe church in black communities, and the churchchurchand

Gendered Identities, Ideologies and Cultural Difference

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

sheet music coversfunctions ofperformersmarketing song titlesmusic production systemmusic industrymass-marketsmarketingby performerscommercialization, of jazzPrior to the 1920s dominance of phonograph records and radio, a dominant American aesthetic was disseminated into households via illustrated sheet music covers. These booklets contained descriptive cover art, music, lyrics, dance instructions and photographs, publicityphotographs of performers that stimulated popular interest in songwriters,

Catwalk Music

Janice Miller

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Music is significant to the catwalk and its narratives, and has had a role in some of the catwalk’s most iconoclastic moments—from Ossie Clark’s “Revolution” shows of the late 1960s and early 1970s to Marc Jacobs’s 1993 show for Perry Ellis that was said to have “killed grunge.” Catwalk music may be bespoke, derivative, live, or recorded. Collaborations between sound designers such as Seigen Ono and Jeremy Healy and global fashion brands, have produced not only individual soundtracks, but also a

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