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Photography in Fashion Advertising since 1970

Paul Jobling

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Photography began to make inroads into advertising—including fashion publicity—by the start of the twentieth century following the evolution of the halftone process in the 1880s. By the 1930s the shift toward photographic methods became more pronounced in advertising, though in fashion publicity line illustrations remained the preferred medium. These could be reproduced more easily (especially when it came to color) but also, given that the visual quality of halftones on newsprint could be somewh

Designers and Models Become Brands

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

In 1921, Gabrielle ‘Coco’ Chanel launched one of the most successful scents of all time (Groom 1997: 21). The iconic oblong bottle for Chanel No. 5, still revered, was carefully designed to her own very strict specifications, and she selected its contents from several versions created by parfumier Ernest Béaux (Charles-Roux 2009). Meanwhile, once established as a designer, she herself also became a fashion leader; she was constantly photographed and always mindful of publicity, whether it was in

Film Stars as Fashion Icons

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Cinema’s new ‘celebrity’ stardom, within a Western context, is qualitatively different from previous forms of fandom or star emulation. In consequence, the existing theories of stardom (Stacey 1994; Gledhill 1991), sometimes co-opted from film studies to explain modern celebrity culture, are not really sufficient, although, as this book will suggest, Richard Dyer’s idea of ‘the ordinary’ has a new relevance in this rather different context (1978/1998). Film studies within the academy must somehow

Changes in Cinematic Culture: Some Celebrity Cover Girls

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Some of the films made by the new celebrity stars may not actually be seen by their fans; they will, however, have seen stills in magazines or on the Internet. When their films are commercially successful, the image of the star seen on screen often matches their most popular off-screen image. Jennifer Aniston in Marley and Me, made in 2009 and more successful at the box office than her previous string of romantic comedies, looks exactly like the off-screen Jennifer Aniston, so often photographed

Branding, Fashion and Music

Janice Miller

Source: Fashion and Music 2011

Book chapter

A kind of special status for creative people is part of a set of characteristics constructed in the nineteenth century by the writers, poets, composers and painters that Raymond Williams (1971) labels the ‘Romantic Artists’. Williams argues that a certain mystique and an almost stereotypical artistic personality were created by and around sets of individuals as a method of resistance to encroaching industrialization.

Clothes and Cultural Identities: Music, Ethnicity and Nation

Janice Miller

Source: Fashion and Music 2011

Book chapter

Martin Stokes contends that music has provided a means by which individuals and communities come to understand themselves in relation to other groups with whom they contrast themselves, thus establishing the ‘difference between’. Therefore, he argues that ‘music is socially meaningful not entirely, but largely because it provides means by which people recognise identities and places and the boundaries which separate them’ (Stokes 1994: 5).

Diverting Denim: Screening Jeans in Bollywood

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Global Denim 2011

Book chapter

During a research visit to Bombay in 2008, I asked a young costume assistant, as we sat talking in a suburban Bombay coffee house, how often she had sourced jeans for films. She replied: ‘Denim is big in films. Our actors are wearing denim throughout the film. They have to have jeans, unless they are wearing a suit. I cannot think of a film where we haven’t used jeans, even actresses.’

Fashion Photography

Patrik Aspers

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The production system behind fashion photography is a collaboration among many sectors in the fashion industry. A photographer takes fashion pictures, usually of models wearing clothes. Garment firms produce the clothes, which are intended to be worn by consumers. Present at the set—that is, the place where the pictures are taken—are often a makeup artist, a hairstylist, and a fashion stylist, all of whom may have assistants. The pictures will be processed and edited on a computer, and they will

Fashion Journalism

Kate Nelson Best

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion journalism embraces all kinds of media commentary, but primarily newspaper and magazine articles, about the fashion industry, those who populate the fashion world, and fashion itself. As such, it has commercial, ideological, and symbolic functions that have remained unchanged since the mid-1800s.

Writing about Fashions

Sandra Stansbery Buckland

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The twentieth century brought many innovations in the fashion world, and those innovations prompted many people to report on new fashions, to analyze them, and even to criticize them. Fashion was, and is, news. Fashion is both an artistic expression and a vital industry that makes significant contributions to a nation’s economy. And fashion is a sartorial mirror that reflects a culture’s values, beliefs, politics, and technologies. Fashion, then, can also be controversial. With so many facets to

Department Store

Bronwen Edwards

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

An important innovation of department stores was their wide variety of merchandise, breaching the boundaries of previously largely trade-specific shop-keeping. Many of the early department stores actually developed from smaller existing shops, most commonly drapers. They grew department by department, taking over neighboring properties to house the expanding businesses, until it was necessary to provide a new building or reface the existing ones to provide coherence. Department store pioneer Will

Display Mannequins

Leopoldina Fortunati

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Although the dress mannequin is usually considered marginal within the marketing and displaying of fashionable clothing, it can be analyzed as a key cultural artifact in the fashion system. The display mannequin is part of an archaic imagery of humankind, similar to automatons, robots, and dolls. At a metaphoric level, it has an importance in Western culture, because on a symbolic plane the mannequin replaces the human being. In fashion, the mannequin engages in the dialogue between the container

Celebrities

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fans

Moira F. Harri

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A handheld fan, made of feathers, leaves, paper, or cloth, with sticks of ivory or wood, is one of the oldest accessories for men and women in the world. There are four basic styles: feather, leaf, folding, and flat. The best-known feather fans use the plumage of the African ostrich. Palm leaves often served as early fans, but any other large leaf could be used. A flat fan is sometimes said to be Chinese in origin. Round in shape, the framed surface could be paper or cloth such as silk or gauze.

Global Positioning of Australian Fashion

Robyn Healy

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Over the years Australia has found it difficult to establish a presence in the fashion centers of Europe and the United States. Yet when Sydney fashion designer Collette Dinnigan staged a full-scale parade in the 1995 official Paris ready-to-wear calendar, it changed forever the perception of Australian fashion as being somewhat out of touch. This defining moment sparked debate and extensive media coverage about a new wave of emerging designers and was crucial in the development of the local indu

Fashion Advertising

Paul Jobling

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion Magazines

Brian Moeran

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion magazines are both cultural products and commodities. As cultural products, they circulate in a cultural economy of collective meanings. They provide how-to recipes, illustrated stories, narratives, and experiential and behavioral models—particularly in the realms of fashion and beauty—in which the reader’s ideal self is reflected and on which she can herself reflect and act. As commodities, fashion magazines are products of the publishing and print industries and important sites for the

Fashion Photography in Australia

Daniel Palmer and Kate Rhodes

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Australian fashion photography has a relatively short history, starting with the earliest examples of fashion advertisements from the beginning of the twentieth century through to the popularization of the genre in Australia via the work of modernist photographers such as Max Dupain and the postwar heyday of Helmut Newton and others. An exploration of the strong voice of independent publishers who have helped to market Australian fashion and style is noted and includes the internationally recogni

Logos

Jane Pavitt

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Hijab Online

Emma Tarlo

Source: Visibly Muslim. Fashion, Politics, Faith 4th Edition 2010

Book chapter

A brief glance at the homepage of thehijabshop.com gives a flavour of the nature of this commercial venture. The consumer is confronted by a range of different products and techniques of display. At the time of writing, this consisted of a new range of trendy modern jilbabs displayed on live models without heads, Cindy van den Bremen’s sports hijabs worn by professional models, the ‘pick of the day’ hijab displayed on a plastic mannequin of Caucasian complexion, a selection of fancy hijab pins, a

Dress in Czech Film of the 1920s and 1930s

Marketa Uhlirová

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

As in other major film centers in Europe and North America, the Czech fashion and film industries developed close ties during the interwar period. The fashion and cosmetics industries recognized film as an ideal form of promotion, one that is far-reaching, popular, and seductive. In turn, the film industry after World War I actively embraced fashion as a necessary appendage to the star system and an ideal vehicle to attract and sustain female audiences through the display of the latest novelties

Brand Storytelling: Context and Meaning for Cargo Pants

Joseph Henry Hancock

Source: Fashion in Fiction. Text and Clothing in Literature, Film, and Television 2009

Book chapter

During the 1960s the postmodernism of the mass media influenced consumer culture through a range of communication outlets (Baldwin, Longhurst, McCracken, Ogborn, and Smith 2000). Media outlets adopted postmodern concepts and ways of imagining the world and presented them to consumers in products including motion pictures, television, and fashion advertising. More recent examples include movies such as Blade Runner, the television series Twin Peaks, and the shopping channel QVC (Hamilton 1997).

Production, Gatekeeping and Diffusion of Fashion

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Fashion-ology. An Introduction to Fashion Studies 2005

Book chapter

Diffusion theories of fashion seek to explain how fashion is spread through interpersonal communication and institutional networks, and they assume that the fashion phenomenon is not ambiguous nor unpredictable. As Horn and Gurel explain: When clothing behavior is expressed in fashion, the behavior is still regular and predictable. Fashions in any area of life, especially fashions in clothing, are not random and purposeless. They reflect the cultural patterns of the times. Fashions follow a prog

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