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Moroccan Lifestyle Media

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity 2015

Book chapter

As was discussed in Chapter 2, the Moroccan nationalist movementnationalist movement brought, among other things, tremendous changes in the lives, consciousness and ambitionambitions of Moroccan women by the middle of the twentieth century. More women were enjoying an educationeducation and soon they discovered the impact the written word could have on their cause. Therefore a first generation of Moroccan women’s magazines introduced in the 1960s were all run by renowned feminists and had a stron

Photography in Fashion Advertising since 1970

Paul Jobling

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Photography began to make inroads into advertising—including fashion publicity—by the start of the twentieth century following the evolution of the halftone process in the 1880s. By the 1930s the shift toward photographic methods became more pronounced in advertising, though in fashion publicity line illustrations remained the preferred medium. These could be reproduced more easily (especially when it came to color) but also, given that the visual quality of halftones on newsprint could be somewh

Boy’s Elegance: A Liminality of Boyish Charm and Old-World Suavity

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

T-shirts with voluminous scarves are now in store . . . the big scarf looks lovely!Milkboy Staff’s Blog, 2013, available at http://ameblo.jp/mb-staff/page-67.html#main [accessed 7 October 2013]. The texts are translated by Masafumi Monden.

Lost in A Gaze: Young Men and Fashion in Contemporary Japan

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

‘Do you understand muslins, sir?’JaneAusten, Northanger Abbey (London: Penguin Books, 1996 [1818]), p. 22.

Cher

Amanda M. B. Pajak

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Cher, born Cherilyn Sarkisian on 20 May 1946, is a singer-performer and actress active since the mid-1960s. Her career started as one-half of the folk-rock duo Sonny & Cher with her then husband, Sonny Bono (1935–1998). After gaining commercial success with their songs—the most impactful being “I Got You Babe” (1965)—the duo embraced the television media format with The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour, which existed in multiple incarnations throughout the decade. It was during the airing of this televis

Anna Piaggi

Victoria Rose Pass

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

From the 1970s until her death in 2012, Anna Piaggi was one of the most recognizable fashion editors in the world. With her shock of bright blue hair, often topped with a doll’s hat worn at a rakish angle, and her penchant for exaggerated—almost clown-like—makeup, Piaggi delighted in dressing with irreverence. She freely combined vintage and contemporary fashion as well as high and low. Born in Milan in 1931, Piaggi began freelancing for Vogue in the 1970s, and in 1988 was hired as a creative con

Linda Evangelista

Laura Peach

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Supermodel Linda Evangelista was one of the most-seen faces in fashion, gracing over 600 magazine covers. Born in Ontario, Canada, Evangelista began modeling as a teenager. In the 1980s, she began working with photographer Peter Lindbergh, and her relationship with him transformed her into a supermodel. Evangelista was most known for the short haircut that shot her modeling career into the stratosphere, launching her as a supermodel. Although many photographs of Evangelista in the 1990s show her

Helena Christensen

Laura Peach

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

As one of the main supermodels in the 1990s, Helena Christensen was frequently photographed for fashion magazines. Born to a Peruvian mother and Danish father, Christensen was raised in Denmark. Her modeling career began when she was a contestant in the Miss Universe beauty pageant in 1986. Shortly after, her modeling career took off in Paris. Although she frequently modeled highly stylized and ostentatious looks, Christensen’s personal style was one of bohemian chic, and off the runway she was s

Princess Diana

Julia Petrov

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Nicknamed the “people’s princess,” Diana Spencer, Princess of Wales, became a much imitated fashion icon during her short life. Her hairstyles, jewelry, and clothing were coveted by women around the world in the 1980s and 1990s; her image is still popularly reproduced in magazines at every anniversary of her death and in association with events in the lives of her two sons, princes William and Harry. While her fashions no longer look as on trend as they once looked, fans continue to flock to see

Brooke Shields

Anne Reimers

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

In the 1980s, American actress Brooke Shields rose from the status of controversial child actress in the film Pretty Baby (1978) to that of a world-famous model, actress, and celebrity. It was her style and particularly her beauty in The Blue Lagoon (1980) that turned her into an icon with a large fan base. In 1981, aged sixteen, her appearance in sexualized adverts for Calvin Klein Jeans redefined the profile of the fashion brand. Shields appeared on the cover of dozens of international magazine

Book chapter

It is widely acknowledged that fashion is modern. If one adopts David Frisby’s definition of modernité as ‘the more general experience of the aestheticization of everyday life, as exemplified in the transitory qualities of an urban culture shaped by the imperatives of fashion, consumerism, and constant innovation,’ fashion is proto-typically modern. (Stewart 2008: xii)

Desi-Chic: The Image and Ideals of Fashion in Indian Magazines

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

The evolution of a distinctive visual identity within the local fashion design industry that responds to Indian tastes, traditions and crafts, along with the presence of international fashion brands in India have not only led to a shift in the sartorial landscape, they have also had an impact on the image and representation of fashion. This was evident in the discussion over the previous chapter with regard to film, television and emerging spheres of fashion blogging, and is also mirrored in prin

Agnès B

Laura Snelgrove

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

1980s Style: Key Themes and Trends

Jo Turney

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The 1980s will always be remembered as the decade of power dressing: a time when clothes became big in terms of size and glamour. Shoulders were padded, skirts were fuller, taffettas were crisper, silks exotic, and colors more vivid. Ostentation was the name of the game and bold patterns, from animal prints to architecture-inspired decoration, emphasized scale and luxury. These were frequently inspired by TV shows and glossy magazines. Luxury was also the watchword in daywear, where tweeds and ca

Picturing the Material/Manifesting the Visual: Aesthetic Dress in Late-Nineteenth-Century British Culture

Kimberly Wahl

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

The complex relationship between material forms of clothing and visual/literary representations of ‘fashion’ is nowhere more clearly articulated than in the dress practices of nineteenth-century Aestheticism. From the 1870s to the 1890s, Aesthetic dress in Britain was characterized by its comfort, elegance and adherence to classical and medieval dress-ideals. Initially based on earlier Pre-Raphaelite models, Aesthetic dress was eclectic and historicist, merging Antique or medieval models with pic

New Markets and Expansion: 1880s–1900

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

By 1880, the six major U.S. pattern companies—Demorest, Butterick, McCall, Harper’s Bazar, Taylor, and Domestic—had positioned themselves in the market. Each published a magazine advertising their patterns for the latest fashions for women, a full complement of children’s clothing, undergarments for all, and shirts, trousers, and various other men’s non-tailored garments.

Shifts and Balances: 1900–1920s

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

A dynamic new figure entered the pattern enterprise in the first decade of the new century. Condé Nast was adept at promotion and was attracted to the pattern industry. He organized the Home Pattern Company and distributed dress patterns in an arrangement with Ladies’ Home Journal in 1905 (Seebohm 1982: 32). The Ladies’ Home Journal was an influential women’s periodical with a circulation of 1,000,000 (Mott 1938: vol. 4, 545). Nast had remarkable marketing skills and successfully promoted pattern

Surviving the Depression: 1930s

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution 2014

Book chapter

Pattern producers repudiate rumors that they enjoyed a boom during the Depression. Like most other businesses, theirs suffers when people are hard up; it recovers when people start spending again. Patterns hit bottom in 1932. Improvement began in the Fall of 1933, but not soon enough to make an increase for the year. Estimates place 1934 ahead of 1933 by about 10%.

The Design and Rhetoric of Menswear Press Advertisements

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

The Art Versus Commerce Debate

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

The Economics of Press Advertising

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Menswear Advertising In Newspapers and Magazines

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Here Comes New Man—Again

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

The Place of Fashion Television in Cinema History: Industrial Discourse and Cultural Legitimacy

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture 2014

Book chapter

The 1998 inaugural edition of the Hollywood Reporter: Fashion in Entertainment special issue emerged during a time of supposedly increased synergy between the fashion and film industries; yet its title—Fashion in Entertainment (my emphasis)—suggests that the trade press anticipated a much more seismic shift which would engulf a number of media and entertainment industries. However, echoing Ginsberg’s comments cited above, it was assumed that sport and music would be the most suitable platforms fo

Fashioning Celebrity: Class, Tastemaking and Cultural Intermediaries

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture 2014

Book chapter

In her article ‘Bringing out the * in You’, Deborah Jermyn (2006) calls for the substantial revision and re-imagining of traditional paradigms of television fame (Ellis 1992; Langer 1981). Using Sarah Jessica Parker as a case study, she demonstrates the ways in which the development of American ‘quality’ television complicates the longstanding assumption that ‘stardom proper’ is an exclusively ‘cinematic phenomenon’. Deriving from Ellis’s model (outlined in the introduction), it has long since be

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