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Moroccan Lifestyle Media

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity 2015

Book chapter

As was discussed in Chapter 2, the Moroccan nationalist movementnationalist movement brought, among other things, tremendous changes in the lives, consciousness and ambitionambitions of Moroccan women by the middle of the twentieth century. More women were enjoying an educationeducation and soon they discovered the impact the written word could have on their cause. Therefore a first generation of Moroccan women’s magazines introduced in the 1960s were all run by renowned feminists and had a stron

Vintage Style and Mediated Memories: Sixties DIY

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture 2015

Book chapter

original clothes from the sixtiesIn spite of the importance attributed to old, original second-hand clothes, it is not the case that all clothes worn by sixties stylers are actual survivors from the 1960s. A restriction to old clothes would lead to a rather reduced wardrobe, since not all clothes desired are available any longer—or may have ever existed in the past. The rarityrarity of old clothes that fit with the current tastetastes and contemporary interest in sixties style makes it essential

Reel to Real Life: Re-Fashioning India from Bollywood to Street

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

Cinema in India is an extremely influential cultural medium. India has the world’s largest film industry with over 1,000 films produced every year in more than 20 languagesIbid. and over 14 million Indians go to the movies on a daily basis.In 2008 the industry was valued at approximately US$2.2 billion, and expected to grow by 9 percent p.a. till 2015 (Deloitte 2011 report: “Media & Entertainment in India Digital Road Ahead.” www.deloitte.com/in [accessed June 4, 2013]) Many more watch them at ho

Jacqueline Hancher

Tory Turk

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

1980s Style: Key Themes and Trends

Jo Turney

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The 1980s will always be remembered as the decade of power dressing: a time when clothes became big in terms of size and glamour. Shoulders were padded, skirts were fuller, taffettas were crisper, silks exotic, and colors more vivid. Ostentation was the name of the game and bold patterns, from animal prints to architecture-inspired decoration, emphasized scale and luxury. These were frequently inspired by TV shows and glossy magazines. Luxury was also the watchword in daywear, where tweeds and ca

Early Commercial Television and Menswear, 1955–60

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Cinema and Television Advertising For Menswear

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

The Jeans Market and Advertising Between 1950 and 1985

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Levi’s 501: Back To The Future?

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Introduction: Approaching Fashion, Identity and Celebrity Culture

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture 2014

Book chapter

Most introductory anthologies on fashion begin with an attempt to answer the following question: what is fashion? This seemingly simple question lacks a simple answer. The meaning and significance of the term has altered over time, and therefore it can be difficult to offer an exact definition. This is compounded by the fact that certain terms are often used interchangeably: e.g. clothing and fashion. This project adheres to the school of thought which, to put it simply, conceives of fashion as a

The Place of Fashion Television in Cinema History: Industrial Discourse and Cultural Legitimacy

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture 2014

Book chapter

The 1998 inaugural edition of the Hollywood Reporter: Fashion in Entertainment special issue emerged during a time of supposedly increased synergy between the fashion and film industries; yet its title—Fashion in Entertainment (my emphasis)—suggests that the trade press anticipated a much more seismic shift which would engulf a number of media and entertainment industries. However, echoing Ginsberg’s comments cited above, it was assumed that sport and music would be the most suitable platforms fo

Costume Design, Practices and Production Cultures

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture 2014

Book chapter

I am a stylist, I like the commerce end of it. I love to style.

Fashion, Costume and Narrative Tropes in TV Drama

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture 2014

Book chapter

The use of fashion in Sex and the City and Ugly Betty is bound up with notions of performativity and ‘excess’. Ugly Betty relies upon an ‘excessive’, ‘camp’ aesthetic which foregrounds its own construction and in so doing adopts an ambiguous attitude towards the notion of the ‘authentic’ self—at times entirely rejecting it in favour of an ‘image-based’ identity. This image-based identity is presented as potentially subversive and resistive, challenging the assumption that the so-called postmodern

Teen Fashion: Youth and Identity in Popular Teen Dramas

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture 2014

Book chapter

Both Gossip Girl and The O.C. share similar thematic and narrative terrain. Each explores topics typically covered in teen dramas (friendship, alienation, family, sex and sexuality, drug and alcohol use, etc.) and is preoccupied with the anxieties regarding one’s position within social hierarchies. These anxieties are magnified insofar as they are shored up by an exploration of class relations; both shows are ‘fish-out-of-water’ narratives. The O.C. charts main character Ryan Attwood’s (Benjamin

Fashioning The Past: Gender, Nostalgia and Excess in ‘Quality’ Period Drama

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture 2014

Book chapter

We always have two reactions to every episode of Mad Men. There’s the reaction to the story and characters, and then there’s the reaction to the costuming.

Fashioning Celebrity: Class, Tastemaking and Cultural Intermediaries

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture 2014

Book chapter

In her article ‘Bringing out the * in You’, Deborah Jermyn (2006) calls for the substantial revision and re-imagining of traditional paradigms of television fame (Ellis 1992; Langer 1981). Using Sarah Jessica Parker as a case study, she demonstrates the ways in which the development of American ‘quality’ television complicates the longstanding assumption that ‘stardom proper’ is an exclusively ‘cinematic phenomenon’. Deriving from Ellis’s model (outlined in the introduction), it has long since be

Consuming Masculinity: Gender, Fashion and TV Celebrity

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture 2014

Book chapter

The 1980s is often cited as an important period during which developments within consumer culture and the fashion industry resulted in increasing media and cultural attention to the male body (Connell 1987; Edwards 1997; Mort 1996; Nixon 1996). Often termed the ‘new man’, a particular incarnation of masculinity emerged which challenged the assumed truth that fashion was an exclusively feminine practice. Writing in the late 1990s, Tim Edwards (1997: 39) suggests that the ‘new man arose as a primar

Locating the Real: America Ferrera, Fashion, Ethnicity and Authenticity

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture 2014

Book chapter

There was Rachel in Friends, there was Carrie in SATC, then there was Ugly Betty.

Conclusion

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture 2014

Book chapter

We can all thank Sex and the City for really giving TV audiences a fashion education. The first episode aired in 1998 and the show was groundbreaking for fashion in popular culture…what we’re seeing now [on television] is the evolution of that.

Fashion Modelling, Blink Technologies and New Imaging Regimes

Elizabeth Wissinger

Source: Fashion Media. Past and Present 2013

Book chapter

The imaging regime dominated by the Internet has changed many things. In a world now punctuated by pop-ups, pings and tweets, we relate to images differently. Images dance at the margins of our vision whether we are at work or at play. With the dawn of this imaging regime in the late 1980s and early 1990s, attention spans have been overwhelmed, pathways of suggestion have proliferated and the volatility of markets has reached a rapid boil.

Introduction, Rationale, Context

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Fashion is the medicament that will console for the phenomenon of forgetting on a collective scale.

Contemporary Television: So Many Celebrities, So Little Fashion?

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Reality television is very much to the fore within the new discipline of celebrity studies, partly because it has stripped the word celebrity of its original meaning. There are the shows that create celebrities from those who were formerly unknown: there are now other, very popular shows which deploy these same figures in a different capacity: Dancing with the Stars/Strictly Come Dancing; Celebrity Duets; I’m a Celebrity—Get Me Out of Here! Shows in this mini-genre use the new reality celebrities

North American Influences on West European Dress

Rebecca Arnold

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

North America’s effect on West European fashion is often viewed only in relation to Hollywood and celebrity. However, its influence has been far more diverse, from technological inventions to leisure wear and the professionalization of the industry.

Television

Patricia A. Cunningham

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In 1948, when Wayne Cox of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) pronounced that television is here to stay, he could not have predicted the real impact this new force unleashed. Writing in 1964, Marshall McLuhan had a better grasp of the situation, claiming that television had potential to transform the world into a “global village.” Television is a powerful tool that gains its power through its ability to express ideas through sight and sound. Fashion and television began a symbiotic rela

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