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Jacqueline Hancher

Tory Turk

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

1980s Style: Key Themes and Trends

Jo Turney

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The 1980s will always be remembered as the decade of power dressing: a time when clothes became big in terms of size and glamour. Shoulders were padded, skirts were fuller, taffettas were crisper, silks exotic, and colors more vivid. Ostentation was the name of the game and bold patterns, from animal prints to architecture-inspired decoration, emphasized scale and luxury. These were frequently inspired by TV shows and glossy magazines. Luxury was also the watchword in daywear, where tweeds and ca

Introduction, Rationale, Context

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Fashion is the medicament that will console for the phenomenon of forgetting on a collective scale.

Contemporary Television: So Many Celebrities, So Little Fashion?

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Reality television is very much to the fore within the new discipline of celebrity studies, partly because it has stripped the word celebrity of its original meaning. There are the shows that create celebrities from those who were formerly unknown: there are now other, very popular shows which deploy these same figures in a different capacity: Dancing with the Stars/Strictly Come Dancing; Celebrity Duets; I’m a Celebrity—Get Me Out of Here! Shows in this mini-genre use the new reality celebrities

North American Influences on West European Dress

Rebecca Arnold

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

North America’s effect on West European fashion is often viewed only in relation to Hollywood and celebrity. However, its influence has been far more diverse, from technological inventions to leisure wear and the professionalization of the industry.

Television

Patricia A. Cunningham

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In 1948, when Wayne Cox of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) pronounced that television is here to stay, he could not have predicted the real impact this new force unleashed. Writing in 1964, Marshall McLuhan had a better grasp of the situation, claiming that television had potential to transform the world into a “global village.” Television is a powerful tool that gains its power through its ability to express ideas through sight and sound. Fashion and television began a symbiotic rela

The Black Leather Jacket

Marilyn DeLong, Kelly Gage, Juyeon Park and Monica Sklar

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the United States, the black leather jacket has been worn throughout much of the twentieth century. During World Wars I and II it was worn mostly for its functional and protective properties, for example, by pilots, who wore the leather bomber jacket. When the leather jacket became the choice of heroic wartime figures such as General Patton in World War II, the details of the jacket were not yet strictly defined.

Dress as Costume in the Theater and Performing Arts

Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In costume, individuals become characters of plays. Dressing for the performing arts works the same way. The performing arts include theater, dance, opera, films, television, and the circus. Costumes are made up of supplements to the body such as gowns and wigs, also including body modifications like makeup. Stylized Japanese Noh masks completely transform actors and constitute artwork in themselves. Throughout most of the history of theater, actors had to supply their own makeup and costumes, bu

Celebrities

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Pants, Trousers

Joseph H. Hancock and Edward Augustyn

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Pants, sometimes referred to as trousers, knickers, khakis, slacks, and various other names, have been worn by many and have influenced almost everyone’s lives. Few studies actually recognize both the historical and cultural significance of pants. Some of the most recent works include such books as Richard Martin’s (1999) photographic essay Khaki, Cut from the Original Cloth and Laurence Benaïm’s Pants: A History Afoot, which traces the history of pants from 550 b.c.e. to the early twenty-first c

Retailing

Seung-Eun Lee

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Store-based retailers use brick-and-mortar stores as primary modes of operation. Major types of store-based retailers include department stores, specialty stores, category killers, discount stores, off-price stores, outlet stores, and boutiques.

Cosplay

Frenchy Lunning

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Cosplay, short for “costume play,” refers to a global practice of building costumes and performing as characters from manga (Japanese comic books), anime (Japanese animation), and other popular sources. Cosplay is also a Japanese subculture, whose performance venue is more public than fan conventions. The term came into usage as the influx of Japanese anime and manga became significant at science fiction and comic book conventions. However, anime- and manga-based cosplay differ from that of scien

Makeup Artists

Elizabeth McLafferty

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Popular Music and Dress in Australia

Sue Ryan

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Australian pop and rock music has been inseparable from fashion since the 1950s. Australia had a popular musical culture from the first days of European settlement, but in the 1950s rock ’n’ roll and pop began to dominate other musical forms. Taking shape as an industry, they were supported by and supported the arrival of television, the growing print media, and radio, which continued to be an essential social bond and cultural disseminator. Dress was increasingly the key that proved to audiences

Wearable Art in New Zealand

Natalie Smith

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Historically, wearable art, or art-to-wear as it is known in North America, emerged out of the counterculture aesthetics of the 1960s. The term loosely referred to the customized surface design of dress, using various techniques including embroidery, beadwork, and painting, as a statement against mass-produced dress. In addition to this personal imagery, symbols appropriated from Eastern religions provided a popular visual resource. New Zealand Wearable Art, on the other hand, is the outcome of a

Television and Fashion in the 1980s

Patricia A. Cunningham, Heather Mangine and Andrew Reilly

Source: Twentieth-Century American Fashion 2008

Book chapter

Editors’ Introduction: The 1980s continued to be influenced by the importance of dressing for success. In fact, the cult of success was seen in the increased consumption of luxury goods by Americans. The Reagan years in America were indeed bountiful. Clothing became ostentatious and worn as a badge of achievement. A coterie of American designers – Donna Karan, Ralph Lauren, and Liz Claiborne – offered women padded shoulders and broad lapels to express their new-found position and commercial power

Book chapter

Structuralism considers the ways in which meaning can be found or ‘fixed’ within a text (Sarup 1993: 3), for example, how the underlying meanings of hair and hairstyling practices can be discovered by carefully ‘unpacking’ its cultural signs or ‘connotations’ (Barthes 1974). In the field of all popular cultural forms, however, we do not experience signs or textual meaning in isolation: ‘the text is always mobilized, placed and articulated with other texts’ (Morley 1996: 287). Allen, referencing B

Fashion as Performance

Annette Lynch and Mitchell D. Strauss

Source: Changing Fashion. A Critical Introduction to Trend Analysis and Meaning 2007

Book chapter

Fashion is defined as the art of the perfect moment, of the sudden and surprising and yet obscurely expected harmonious apparition—the Now at the threshold of an immediate future. But its realization is, at the same time, its destruction. By appearing, and giving definitive form to the moment, fashion is almost already part of yesterday.

Sex, Dress, and Power in the Workplace: ‘Star Trek, The Next Generation’

Sharron J. Lennon

Source: Appearance and Power 1999

Book chapter

French and Raven (1959) present a typology of the bases of social power in interpersonal influence which has been subsequently revised and updated several times (Raven, 1965, 1983, 1992, 1993). Raven (1992) defined social influence as ‘a change in the belief, attitude or behavior of a person, the target of influence, which results from the action, or presence, of another person or group of persons, the influencing agent’ (p. 218). Given this definition of social influence, social power is then de

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