Results: Text (41) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 41 (2 pages)
    Page 1 of 2
Fashion Journalism and the Catwalk

Julie Bradford

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The second half of the twentieth century may go down as a golden age for the fashion press covering the collections. As ready-to-wear shows multiplied and fashion became part of popular culture—but before live-streaming and social media meant that everyone could see collections instantly—journalists were in a uniquely privileged position to convey news of this exciting new world to a burgeoning audience. This article will investigate how integral the press was to the development of fashion shows

Consuelo Castiglioni

Giulia Bussinello

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Croatia: Urban Dress, Twentieth to Twenty-First Centuries

Maja Arčabić

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Croatia entered the twentieth century split up into several territorial units within the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Dalmatia and Istria belonged to the Austrian part, while Civil Croatia and Slavonia, as well as the city of Rijeka, were under the control of Budapest. The continuity of Croatia as a political entity in its own right was maintained by the parliament, or Sabor, which convened in Zagreb, the capital of Croatia and Slavonia, but lacked any significant authority. The border between the tw

Fashion Journalism

Kate Nelson Best

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion journalism embraces all kinds of media commentary, but primarily newspaper and magazine articles, about the fashion industry, those who populate the fashion world, and fashion itself. As such, it has commercial, ideological, and symbolic functions that have remained unchanged since the mid-1800s.

Visual Media and Dress

Stella Bruzzi and Pamela Gibson Church

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Visual media have played an enormous role in the development of fashion in West Europe. Fashion imagery emerged within print journalism, more specifically women’s magazines, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The development of popular cinema in the first half of the twentieth century had a momentous impact on the global fashion industry, especially in the star system, the “tie-in,” and the involvement of both couturiers and ready-to-wear designers in film. From the radical changes of th

Writing about Fashions

Sandra Stansbery Buckland

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The twentieth century brought many innovations in the fashion world, and those innovations prompted many people to report on new fashions, to analyze them, and even to criticize them. Fashion was, and is, news. Fashion is both an artistic expression and a vital industry that makes significant contributions to a nation’s economy. And fashion is a sartorial mirror that reflects a culture’s values, beliefs, politics, and technologies. Fashion, then, can also be controversial. With so many facets to

France

Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The French Revolution abolished the rigid dress etiquette and bureaucracy of the ancien régime fashion industry. Napoleon’s campaigns inspired fashions with soldierly details and created a vogue for exotic accessories. His imperial court ensured the survival of French luxury goods industries, while promoting a more modern silhouette. Napoleon encouraged pre-Revolutionary tastes for classical Greek and Roman styles, to glorify his own reign. The restoration of the Bourbon monarchy and the Romantic

Fashion on Smartphones

Leopoldina Fortunati and Yao Nie

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

This article investigates fashion mobile applications that are mapped according to their features: content typology, number and average scores of ratings, as well as number of reviews posted by users and their content. Second, user behavior is compared between the United States and China, the two biggest smartphone markets in the world. Fashion mobile applications have an indirect relationship with the fashion system and millions of potential customers. In these applications, in fact, the relatio

Fashion Journalism

Marylou Luther

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Romanian Urban Dress after 1900

Sanda Miller

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The role of fashion as a barometer of social progress was reflected in the speed with which Romanian society discarded the Ottoman dress they had worn for hundreds of years for West European attire at the beginning of the twentieth century. The extent of the cultural influence France exerted over Romania from the early 1900s until World War II—when Romania became one of the satellite countries of the Soviet Union—can be measured by the monumental exhibition entitled Expozitiunea generala romana t

Fashion Magazines

Brian Moeran

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion magazines are both cultural products and commodities. As cultural products, they circulate in a cultural economy of collective meanings. They provide how-to recipes, illustrated stories, narratives, and experiential and behavioral models—particularly in the realms of fashion and beauty—in which the reader’s ideal self is reflected and on which she can herself reflect and act. As commodities, fashion magazines are products of the publishing and print industries and important sites for the

Japanese Men’s Fashion Magazines

Masafumi Monden

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Japanese market for men’s fashion magazines has been flourishing. Japanese men’s fashion magazines are not only numerous but also diverse, with stylistic categories that closely correspond with specific reader demographics. The significance of these Japanese men’s fashion periodicals is highlighted by the domination of fashion over lifestyle content. Another notable characteristic is the unique utilization of dokusha models (amateur models; a literal translation would be “reader models”), who

Fineboys

Masafumi Monden

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Early History of Dress and Fashion in Continental West Europe

Mechthild Müller

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The discovery of the Iceman “Oetzi,” who lived between 3500 and 3000 b.c.e., provides valuable information on early dress. His many garments included a patchwork-style goat-fur mantle. Much later, Roman dress included tunics and togas for Roman citizens or friendly allied nations. In 816/817 Charlemagne’s son, Louis the Pious, made monks and members of the clergy accept dress codes. Lay men and women were required to dress differently, and women had to cover their heads in public. Fashion during

Women’s Wear Daily

Janet Ozzard

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dress and Art: Western

Sandra L. Rosenbaum

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Images of people wearing clothing create an obvious connection between dress and art. Because relatively few examples of historic garments survive, these images document the history of dress. Historically, those sitting for portraits chose their dress to project a specific image; the artist was responsible for conveying messages encoded in dress, meticulously reproducing them. Ann Rosalind Jones and Peter Stallybrass have commented that Renaissance clothes were perceived as material forms of pers

The Beauty Blogosphere

Shari Sims

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Women have sought advice—from each other, from experts, from style setters, from servants to the stars—for as long as they have decorated their appearance using cosmetics. Non-Western women passed down traditions from one generation to another; in the twenty-first century, social media have literally upended traditions while helping to create new ones. There are hundreds of beauty blogs (some estimate at least four hundred) in addition to the active Web sites of women’s magazines and cosmetics co

Czech Urban Dress, Nineteenth Century to 1948

Eva Uchalová

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Czech fashion refers to fashionable clothes created in the Czech lands, that is, Bohemia, Moravia, and Silesia, that were designed, made, and used by all nations that lived in these territories, the largest of which were the Czechs, Germans, and Jews. In general, Czech fashion was based on the international Western style created in Paris, London, and Vienna, and to a lesser extent in Berlin; the local fashion centers were Prague and, in Moravia, Brno and Olomouc. In the nineteenth century, the cl

Hungary: Urban Dress, 1948 to 2000

Tibor Valuch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dress customs in Hungary changed markedly at the turn of the 1950s. The Hungarian Fashion Designers’ Union stated that a modern designer’s task was not to dream up dress fantasy for a few stylish ladies, but to design attractive, practical clothes for millions of working women. Magazines for woman offered practical advice on altering outdated bourgeois clothes and suggested that the dress of today’s woman was practical, healthy, and pretty, and that the big stores served the interests of working

Femininity and Consumption: The Problem of the Late Nineteenth-Century Fashion Journal

Christopher Breward

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

By 1875 the women's magazine industry was well established. Having rejected the more literary and élitist model of late eighteenth-century feminine literature, nineteenth-century publishers turned to new forms ‘designed solely to entertain, being composed of fiction, fashion and miscellaneous reading of a superficial kind’.C.White, Women's Magazines 1693–1968, London, 1970. An accompanying boost in production and circulation figures is seen by publishing historiansM.Harris & A.Lee (eds.), The Pre

The Treatises of Dandyism

Rhonda K. Garelick

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

The Traité is, of course, an early text that predates the phenomena that I shall be talking about later, addressing itself to a purely aristocratic audience. Appearing in installments in the royalist review La Mode, Balzac's text coincided with a crisis in that magazine's political identity. The Traité was published in five consecutive issues during the autumn of 1830 (between October 2 and November 6), when the directorship of La Mode was struggling to define its reaction to the July Revolution

Magic Fashion

Elizabeth Wilson

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

Routine makes drudgery of beauty care and the upkeep of the wardrobe. Horror at the depreciation that all living growth entails will arouse in certain frigid or frustrated women a horror of life itself; they endeavour to preserve themselves as others preserve furniture or canned food. This negative obstinacy makes them enemies of their own existence … good meals spoil the figure, wine injures the complexion, too much smiling brings wrinkles, the sun damages the skin, sleep makes one dull, work we

Issue 1

P. N. Furbank and A. M. Cain

Source: Mallarmé on Fashion. A Translation of the Fashion MagazineLa Dernière mode, with Commentary 2004

Book chapter

On the argument that, in this late-summer hiatus between years, it is not plain what the new or ‘latest’ fashion is going to be, Madame de Ponty chooses for her first article a permanent and unchanging topic, jewellery.

Issue 2

P. N. Furbank and A. M. Cain

Source: Mallarmé on Fashion. A Translation of the Fashion MagazineLa Dernière mode, with Commentary 2004

Book chapter

Ix’s approach to his lady-readers, as we see, is highly insidious. He keeps encouraging them in a ferocious snobbery and chauvinism, until it dawns on us that his cruel mockery of the foreign tourists can be read, equally well or better, as mockery of the Parisians, vainly pluming themselves on their high culture and esprit and the supremacy of their city. (For after all, according to the logic of the argument, they have not actually seen these foreign invaders, they are merely imagining them.) I

Issue 3

P. N. Furbank and A. M. Cain

Source: Mallarmé on Fashion. A Translation of the Fashion MagazineLa Dernière mode, with Commentary 2004

Book chapter

For Ix, Issue 3 is an occasion to express his real preferences and his strongest dislikes in the theatre, without too much concealment. What his readers would be supposed to make of this is a question one keeps asking oneself. Though he detests vaudeville and its ‘Poverty-stricken language’, Ix manages, as we see, to pay a most handsome and fanciful compliment to the celebrated Pauline Virginie Déjazet (1797-1875), queen of the vaudeville theatre for fifty years. Déjazet specialised in ‘breeches’

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 41 (2 pages)
Page 1 of 2