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Traje De Crioula: Representing Nineteenth-Century Afro-Brazilian Dress

Aline T. and Monteiro Damgaard

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

This chapter examines representations of Afro-Brazilian dress from nineteenth-century Brazil with the aim of examining the traje de crioula’s origin, formation and influence. The research includes comparative analysis of a broad range of nineteenth-century visual representations and written descriptions alongside analysis of surviving garments currently held in museum collections, and their subsequent interpretation and display. To present a case study for this chapter, a sample of four images is

All Out in the Wash: Convict Stain Removal in the Narryna Heritage Museum’s Dress Collection

Jennifer Clynk and Sharon Peoples

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

This study extends historian Stefan Petrow’s 2009 study of the convict stain and Narryna by suggesting ways in which its effects can be overcome or reinterpreted, especially in relation to dress. The metaphor of the convict stain relates to a social stigma dating from the 1840s, when anti-transportationists in VDL began a fierce political and moral campaign against convict transportation to the colony. The stain metaphor was a nineteenth-century term applied by historians from the 1850s through t

Book chapter

Using legacies left to them by their mother Emma, and with financial help from their father, Norman Hartnell and his sister Phyllis opened a couture house on a small scale at 10 Bruton Street, Mayfair in 1923. By 1934 Hartnell had become a very successful and wealthy couture fashion designer, and the firm moved to much larger premises at 26 Bruton Street, employing up to 500 staff and producing thousands of couture garments a year by 1939. A close study of reviews of his fashion collections in th

Vintage Style and Mediated Memories: Sixties DIY

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture 2015

Book chapter

original clothes from the sixtiesIn spite of the importance attributed to old, original second-hand clothes, it is not the case that all clothes worn by sixties stylers are actual survivors from the 1960s. A restriction to old clothes would lead to a rather reduced wardrobe, since not all clothes desired are available any longer—or may have ever existed in the past. The rarityrarity of old clothes that fit with the current tastetastes and contemporary interest in sixties style makes it essential

Photography in Fashion Advertising since 1970

Paul Jobling

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Photography began to make inroads into advertising—including fashion publicity—by the start of the twentieth century following the evolution of the halftone process in the 1880s. By the 1930s the shift toward photographic methods became more pronounced in advertising, though in fashion publicity line illustrations remained the preferred medium. These could be reproduced more easily (especially when it came to color) but also, given that the visual quality of halftones on newsprint could be somewh

Photographing Street Style: Bill Cunningham and Beyond

Brent Luvaas

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Whether started by New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham, or extending much further back, street-style photography has become an increasingly influential medium within the global fashion industry, with hundreds of bloggers now documenting the real-time trends of “real people” throughout the globe. But as the breadth and influence of street style grew between the 1970s and the mid-2000s, its practitioners stuck steadfastly to a set of common photographic conventions, investing street style w

Street Style: A Brief History

Brent Luvaas

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Over the last couple of decades, the meaning of the term “street style,” both within and outside of the fashion industry, has shifted profoundly from a description of the urban subcultural styles that emerged out of “the street” to those ordinary—but still stylish—forms of dress worn by “real people” in their everyday lives, to, finally, just another genre of fashion photography that captures the looks of fashion insiders outside runway shows. This article provides a brief history of the concept

Modeling History: How Models Have Changed Between the 1970s and 2000

Julia Rea

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The role and significance of the fashion model has been subject to a series of profound changes since the professionalization of the occupation in the late nineteenth century. These variations have been catalyzed by a wide range of social, cultural, and creative influences, from shifting trends in photography and fashion and changing ideals of beauty and femininity to the advent of technology, the Internet, and social media. When Vogue launched in the United States in 1892, the magazine’s fashion

Picturing the Material/Manifesting the Visual: Aesthetic Dress in Late-Nineteenth-Century British Culture

Kimberly Wahl

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

The complex relationship between material forms of clothing and visual/literary representations of ‘fashion’ is nowhere more clearly articulated than in the dress practices of nineteenth-century Aestheticism. From the 1870s to the 1890s, Aesthetic dress in Britain was characterized by its comfort, elegance and adherence to classical and medieval dress-ideals. Initially based on earlier Pre-Raphaelite models, Aesthetic dress was eclectic and historicist, merging Antique or medieval models with pic

Appraised, Displayed, and Concealed: Fashion Photography on The Swedish Museum Stage

Anna Dahlgren

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

Röhsska Museet, founded in 1916, is dedicated to fashion, design, and craft. It currently holds a collection of 50,000 artifacts; dresses and accessories and other artifacts from the fashion system, but the collection contains only a handful of fashion photographs.When this text was written in 2011 Röhsska had not a single fashion photograph in the collection, www.designmuseum.se and telephone interview with Anna Billing-Wetterlundh, curator, Röhsska Museet, April 26, 2011. Since then the museum

The Design and Rhetoric of Menswear Press Advertisements

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

The Art Versus Commerce Debate

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

More Than Just A Number: A New Style of Advertising For The 1990s

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Current Issues in The Fashion Media: Industry Roundtable

Djurdja Bartlett, Shaun Cole and Agnès Rocamora (eds)

Source: Fashion Media. Past and Present 2013

Book chapter

Laura Bradley, former fashion features editor at SHOWstudio, editor of i-D online (at the time of the conference), and now editor of Another.com and commissioning editor of Another Magazine

‘To The Ends of The Earth’: Fashion and Ethnicity in The Vogue Fashion Shoot

Sarah Cheang

Source: Fashion Media. Past and Present 2013

Book chapter

The August 2007 issue of British Vogue contains a twenty-page fashion story with the heroic, romantic and evocative title ‘To the Ends of the Earth’. Photographed by Tim Walker in Papua New Guinea, a set of sixteen entrancing and startling pictures dramatize fashion through portraits of the model in physical and editorial juxtaposition with landscapes, forests and local tribesmen. These arresting images are deliberately set in place. They are given an explicit and expanded sense of location by wr

Fashion, Media And Gender in Christian Schad’s Portraiture of the 1920s

Änne Söll

Source: Fashion Media. Past and Present 2013

Book chapter

With few exceptions, German fashion magazines around the time of the First World War employed studio photographs in the tradition of nineteenth-century portrait photography, which, in the spirit of painted portraiture, showed women in artificial settings in a series of theatrical poses (Figure 7.1) owing much to the dramatized photographic portraits of nineteenth-century actresses (Holschbach 2004: 205–15). Photography was considered an indexical medium that provided the viewer a glimpse of ‘real

Caught on Camera: The Fashioned Body and The Criminal Body

Nilgin Yusuf

Source: Fashion Media. Past and Present 2013

Book chapter

Fashion. noun; a popular or the latest style of clothing, hair decoration or behaviour *the production and marketing of new styles of clothing and cosmetics *a manner of doing something.

Film Stars as Fashion Icons

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Cinema’s new ‘celebrity’ stardom, within a Western context, is qualitatively different from previous forms of fandom or star emulation. In consequence, the existing theories of stardom (Stacey 1994; Gledhill 1991), sometimes co-opted from film studies to explain modern celebrity culture, are not really sufficient, although, as this book will suggest, Richard Dyer’s idea of ‘the ordinary’ has a new relevance in this rather different context (1978/1998). Film studies within the academy must somehow

Changes in Cinematic Culture: Some Celebrity Cover Girls

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: Fashion and Celebrity Culture 2012

Book chapter

Some of the films made by the new celebrity stars may not actually be seen by their fans; they will, however, have seen stills in magazines or on the Internet. When their films are commercially successful, the image of the star seen on screen often matches their most popular off-screen image. Jennifer Aniston in Marley and Me, made in 2009 and more successful at the box office than her previous string of romantic comedies, looks exactly like the off-screen Jennifer Aniston, so often photographed

Missionary Dress in Samoa

Prue Ahrens

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The first European Christian missionaries to establish a station in the South Pacific were members of the London Missionary Society (LMS) who arrived in Tahiti in 1797. Over the next one hundred years a number of European Christian denominations established missions there. For example, mission stations were established in Tonga by Wesleyans (1826) and Marists (1832), and in the Gilberts and Ellice Islands (now Kiribati and Tuvalu) by the LMS (1877) and the Catholic Sacred Heart Mission (1881). In

Fashion Photography

Patrik Aspers

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The production system behind fashion photography is a collaboration among many sectors in the fashion industry. A photographer takes fashion pictures, usually of models wearing clothes. Garment firms produce the clothes, which are intended to be worn by consumers. Present at the set—that is, the place where the pictures are taken—are often a makeup artist, a hairstylist, and a fashion stylist, all of whom may have assistants. The pictures will be processed and edited on a computer, and they will

Early French Fashion Photography

Marie Botkin

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The desire to represent nature as it was marked the advent of photography, with as much detail as the lens would permit. Photography in the early 1800s, as Frenchman Louis Daguerre developed it in the daguerreotype, used a technique that lent itself more to the creation of images resembling an eighteenth-century miniature than a photographic image in the twenty-first century. Daguerre did not envision his work in sun printing in the 1830s as a form of self-expression or as a way to circulate the

Jacques-Henri Lartigue

Marie Botkin

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

See alsoEarly French Fashion Photography.

Horst, Horst P.

William Ewing

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Horst Bohrmann was born in Weissenfels-an-der-Saale, Thuringia, in 1906, the second son of prosperous, middle-class, Protestant parents. The family suffered financial hardships as a result of World War I but eventually recovered in the 1920s, enabling Horst to attend the Hamburg School of Applied Art, where he studied furniture making and carpentry. Exposure to Bauhaus principles and personalities led him to seek an apprenticeship in Paris with Le Corbusier. However, Horst was disappointed both w

Avedon, Richard

William Ewing

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

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