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Menswear Retail and Trends

Aki Choklat

Source: Menswear Trends, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Retailtrend services by Retail – referring to the broader concept of the commercial activity of selling and buying – is one of the largest sectors to use trend services. Trend data and information can be used in numerous ways and in various sectors of menswear retail. For example, it can be used in the design of the actual product, if the retailer has its own brand, or it can be used in buying as an investment guide for the next season. Merchandisers work closely with buyers and with designers in

Fashion, Whisky and ‘Muscular’ Neo-Royals

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The final chapter turns to the world of elite men and the balancing acts of masculinity that they perform in order to cultivate their image of power.The role played by the ‘rhetoric of muscularity’ is investigated, as is the threat of effeminacy, stemming among other things from their indulgence in luxury and consumption. In order to counteract this threat, men appropriate symbols of low class machismo and incorporate them in the elitist aesthetic, in a similar way in which they use ‘dirty’ subst

Conclusion

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The conclusion reviews the central points of the work, focusing especially on the power dynamics between the producers and designers, the poor and the rich, the rise of expert privilege and the logic of philanthrocapitalism as an instrument of power. It claims that the current philanthrocapitalism that has taken elite India by storm is deeply neo-feudal in its nature while being wrapped up in rhetoric of good intentions. As such it is a telling sign of the times of brutally rising socio-economic

Producing Cosmopolitanism, Hierarchy and Social Cohesion

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The second chapter develops the theme of imagined economy and India’s superpowerdom by focusing on the symptomatic commodification of past and heritage in fashion design. It does so by zooming onto the complex material and ideological production of traditional chikan embroidery from Lucknow, a city remembered for its past opulence, cosmopolitanism and luxurious lifestyle. It traces the movement of this embroidery, popular with India’s leading designers, from the local networks of its material pro

Neo-Feudal Ornamentalism and Elitist Fantasies

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The first chapter introduces the Indian fashion industry, the dominant neo-aristocratic aesthetics in contemporary luxury fashion design and the recent intensification of the business elites’ obsession with displays of opulent Indianness and their desire to master time and space through conspicous displays of status. It walks the reader through three key rituals. First, the interactions between designers and their clients in the studios, where they ‘celebrate Indianness’ together. Second, the fas

Charitable Non-Love and Philanthrocapitalism

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Chapter 4 further develops the theme of power relations between design and craft and between the rich and the poor. Many designers working with craftspeople also run non-governmental organizations to ‘empower’ these workers, while cultivating the rhetoric of ethical business and philanthropy, and offering their customers in addition to luxurious clothing also good conscience. Such NGOs and trusts become effective tools of co-option of the village workforce into the capitalist system and reproduce

Erotic Capital and Benevolence of Vampish Goddesses

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Chapter 6 deals with elite women and their utilization of designer fashion in claiming social power and cultivating erotic capital. Designers in collaboration with their elite female clients develop the cultural tropes of the courtesans and the benevolent goddesses in order to enhance the women’s power in the business sphere dominated by men. Carving a space for themselves in the business world or public life, while being good and moral wives is problematic. In order to be both moral and sexy, th

Design Genius and his Ghost Others

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The third chapter turns to the tensed relations between design and craft. Developing further the case of chikan embroidery, as it moves from villages to fashion boutiques, the chapter analyses the ways in which material labour is artificially separated from immaterial labour. It shows how the designers’ narratives about creativity, innovation and artistic genius systematically push craftspeople into invisibility, inferiority and passivity, and deny their creativity, individuality and agency. The

Introduction

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

White Lotus, the theme of the funeral that has transported us into the world of fashion designers and the South Delhi business elite, is a fitting metaphor for the key motif of this book. It is also a fitting metaphor for the ethnographic journey in which this work is grounded and for its analytical angle. Like the lotus, the beauties ritualof Indian fashion and heritage luxuryheritage luxury cannot be conceived without their juxtaposition, without the mud from which they grow and that brings the

Insubordinations of the Laughing Craftswoman

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

This chapter returns back to the villages surrounding Lucknow, where women embroider the luxurious fabrics for the elites while being patronized by the designers, their NGOs and discourses of ‘ethical business’. Recognizing the destructive power of such efforts and the potential violence inherent in benevolence, the craftswomen use often irony and laughter when confronted with patronizing discourses that position them as vulnerable, poor and in constant need of rescue. They mock the designers and

Financialization and Trends—Trends as Fashion Risk

Jenny Lantz

Source: The Trendmakers. Behind the Scenes of the Global Fashion Industry, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

I’m completely ignorant. I’m a stock market analyst. I have been to two fashion shows, Burberry and Hugo Boss, and I have no clue if they are going to work, if it’s good or not. People around me looked like they were enjoying what they were seeing. No, as an analyst you always look at other things.

Defining the Customer

Linda Tain

Source: Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers. Fourth Edition, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The importance of focusing on a specific market and customer is directly linked to the job search process. Each clothing company has a reputation for a particular kind of clothing. This is not to say a company cannot make more than one product. Those that have divisions or licensees offer a variety of merchandise. Some companies have diffusion or secondary lines that capture “the look” the designer is known for while serving a different price point and category. For example, Ralph LaurenRalph Lau

Mexico

Diana Bank Weinberg, Mohammad Ayub Khan and Jaya Halepete

Source: Retailing In Emerging Markets, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Mexicooverview and historyemerging marketsMexicoMexicoAfter reading this chapter, you will

Turkey

Elida Camille Behar, Shubhapriya Bennur and Serkan Yalcin

Source: Retailing In Emerging Markets, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Turkeyemerging marketsTurkeyAfter reading this chapter, you will

China

Shubhapriya Bennur, Yiyue Fan, Md. Rashaduzzaman, Laubie Li, Jun Ying Yu and Jaya Halepete

Source: Retailing In Emerging Markets, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After reading this chapter, you will:

Qatar

Shubhapriya Bennur, Md. Rashaduzzaman, Samirah Alotaibi and Yiyue Fan

Source: Retailing In Emerging Markets, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Qataroverview and historyQatarThe State of Qatar is situated on a peninsula projecting into the Arabian Gulf, bordering Saudi Arabia to the south. Prior to the discovery of oil, the Qatari economy was largely based on pearl fishing. Within its 11,586 km2, Qatar holds the world’s third-largest gas reserves and the largest single non-associated gas field. Today, through the careful exploitation of these massive hydrocarbon resources, Qatar ranks as one of the richest nations in the world, achieving

Thailand

Takeshi K.N., Monthinee Tricharoenrat, Shubhapriya Bennur and John Walsh

Source: Retailing In Emerging Markets, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Turkeyoverview and history“Thainess, ”Thailandretailers, domesticThailandoverview and historyemerging marketsThailandThailandAfter reading this chapter, you will

The Fashion Buyer

David Shaw and Dimitri Koumbis

Source: Fashion Buying. From Trend Forecasting to Shop Floor, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A fashion buyer is the individual or group of individuals (the buying team) whose primary role is to purchase merchandise for a retail organization. They work diligently in researching trends; sourcing materials and/or product; creating seasonal buying plans; and working with outside vendors and designers to produce a range that will be distributed through various retail channels such as brick-and-mortar locations, online stores, and/or catalogs.

Capital of Luxury and Fashion

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Je suis un grand artist, j’ai la couleur de Delacroix, et je compose. Une toilette vaut un tableau.

Russia

Diana Bank Weinberg, Andrey Gabisov and Jaya Halepete

Source: Retailing In Emerging Markets, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After reading this chapter, you will

Three: The King of Lifestyle Merchandising: Ralph Lauren

Joseph H. Hancock

Source: Brand Story. Cases and Explorations in Fashion Branding, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Ralph Lauren was born on October 14, 1939, the son of Russian Jewish immigrants. His real name was Ralph Lifshitz, but in his late teens, he and his brothers had their names changed to Lauren. He had a normal childhood, with a modest upbringing. He grew up in the Bronx and lived with his parents in a two-bedroom apartment. He shared a room with his brothers throughout his childhood and often wore their hand-me-down clothes. He became accustomed to the worn look of the garments and eventually enjo

Hermès

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Prada

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Luxury

Jonathan Faiers

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Luxury and fashion today are increasingly uttered in the same breath, and while fashion certainly does not have to be luxurious, the term fashion adds a significance and meaning to everyday clothing that elevates it above its chief utilitarian functions of providing protection, warmth, and modesty. The combination luxury fashion, however, implies cost, exclusivity, indulgence, and excess, and is typically understood as being constructed from the finest materials, involving a high level of craftsm

Gloves ‘of the Very Thin Sort’: Gifting Limerick Gloves in the Late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries

Liza Foley

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Although leather was essential for the production of a wide range of eighteenth-century objects, including gloves, very little consideration has been given to the significance of the materiality of leather itself. As historian Giorgio Riello has shown, leather was a scarce material in pre-Industrial England. ‘Confined to the natural world and to a stable cattle asset’ (2008: 77), its production largely depended on the meat market, which, in the case of sheep, and to a greater extent cattle, accou

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