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Importing fashion merchandise

Deanna Clark-Esposito

Source: A Practical Guide to Fashion Law and Compliance, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

importingglobal systemIf you look around the average American household today you will quickly discover that most of the articles there are from other countries. You would find the same result when examining the labels on your wearing apparel and may even realize that 100 percent of your clothes have been imported with much of it from China, as the 2015 dollar value in apparel imports from China alone totaled $30,540,941,000.http://otexa.trade.gov/msrcty/v5700.htm (viewed on August 23, 2016).

Fabrication

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“Every time that I wanted to give up, if I saw an interesting textile, print, whatever, suddenly I would see a collection.”

Best Practices: Peg and Awl: To Make Things out of Other Things: Interview by Janet Hethorn, September 30, 2014

Janet Hethorn and Connie Ulasewicz (eds)

Source: Sustainable Fashion What’s Next?. A Conversation about Issues, Practices and Possibilities, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“Peg and Awl” is the title of a song by the Carolina Tar Heels. Margaux reflects, “It’s a song that I liked about shoemaking and also takes us back to a time when things were made well.” The Peg and Awl logo contains a Hagal rune symbol, meaning (in part), “what happens after the destruction.” This also symbolizes continuous change and creative building. Both their name and visual messaging, via marketing and social media, reflect their values of quality and renewal. It was clear from the start o

Stella McCartney

Michelle Labrague

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Social Media as a Tool for Social Change

Domenica Peterson

Source: Sustainable Fashion What’s Next?. A Conversation about Issues, Practices and Possibilities, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

DOMENICA PETERSON is a garment industry executive whose positions have concentrated on building coalitions within the sustainable fashion industry as well as educating companies and consumers about the opportunities available for a more sustainable world through better practices in apparel production and consumption. In 2010 she cofounded the non-profit Global Action Through Fashion (GATF) with the vision to create a more equitable and sustainable world through fashion, and in 2014 Domenica launc

How Ethics and Social Responsibility Impact Consumer Behavior

Patricia Mink Rath, Stefani Bay, Richard Petrizzi and Penny Gill

Source: The Why Of The Buy. Consumer Behavior and Fashion Marketing, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

As you've learned throughout this book, many conscious and unconscious factors go into every purchase decision a consumer makes. For a growing number of consumers in the 21st century, those factors include ethical considerations. Ethics is a system of moral values, or a set of principles that define right and wrong. In some cases, ethical standards are established for an entire culture or profession; medical ethics, for example, prescribe that physicians shall provide competent medical care, with

Social Responsibility and Innovation in the Sewn Products Industry

Connie Ulasewicz

Source: Sustainable Fashion What’s Next?. A Conversation about Issues, Practices and Possibilities, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

CONNIE ULASEWICZ, PHD, is an international consultant focusing on issues of socially responsible manufacturing practices and product reuse. She engages with students as a professor at San Francisco State University and with industry professionals through PeopleWearSF (www.peoplewearsf.org). “Fashion is about change,” she says. “If sustainable design and development are our goals, then let us engage thoughtfully and intelligently as we participate in changing what is considered fashionable.”

The life cycle of a garment

Alison Gwilt

Source: A Practical Guide to Sustainable Fashion, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

‘I think it’s important to educate one’s self, to try to provide a high-quality product for the consumer and not to lose any of the desirability, and yet also to try to be more responsible in the way that you think and the way you source your materials.’

Ethics in Everyday Life

V. Ann Paulins and Julie L. Hillery

Source: Ethics in the Fashion Industry, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

ethics (eth´iks) n.1 the study of standards of conduct and moral judgment; moral philosophy 2 a treatise on this study 3 [with sing. or pl. v.] the system or code of morals of a particular person, religion, group, profession, etc.Webster’s New World College Dictionary, Fourth Edition, p. 488.

Ethical Consumer Decisions

V. Ann Paulins and Julie L. Hillery

Source: Ethics in the Fashion Industry, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The underlying function in a free economy is the notion of consumer sovereignty—the concept that the consumer is all-powerful. A supplier’s success in the economy depends on whether consumers will choose that company’s goods over a competitor’s. When consumers are sovereign, their decisions about buying products that are manufactured abroad, in nonunion settings or by children, determine whether those business practices can be supported. Likewise, consumers vote with their pocketbooks to determin

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