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Care and Renovation of Textiles

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Knowledge of cleaning processes and the ways in which they affect textile materials is important to an overall understanding of textiles.

Garment Construction Details Lab

Janace E. Bubonia

Source: Apparel Quality Lab Manual, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In Chapter 4 of Apparel Quality: A Guide to Evaluating Sewn Products, garment construction details and methods for achieving fit of apparel products are discussed. There are many options for shaping garments to contour the body while maintaining the appropriate amount of functional ease and aesthetic appeal. When designers make selection decisions for the style of openings, closures, and hem finishes for productio

Raw Materials and Sewn Products Testing

Janace E. Bubonia

Source: Apparel Quality. A Guide To Evaluating Sewn Products, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

When customers purchase apparel products, they expect garments to maintain their shape and appearance during wear and after multiple cleanings. When designers are developing products, they must take into consideration the care methods required for all of the garment materials and components to ensure compatibility when cleaning occurs. Standards for care labeling, such as those created by ISO/GINITEX, ASTM International, and JIS, provide both manufacturers and consumers with consistent care symbo

Use

Alison Gwilt

Source: A Practical Guide to Sustainable Fashion, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

‘Buy less, choose well, make it last.’

Women’s Invisible Labor in Dress Practices: Care

Leopoldina Fortunati

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion consumption hides a great deal of invisible labor; changes in this labor have influenced and silently but effectively reoriented the fashion world. This invisible labor is the work done in everyday life to buy, clean, iron, and mend clothes. These supplementary but ongoing tasks keep clothes in good condition. To what extent is this labor still performed at a mass level? Who does it in the early twenty-first century? A survey carried out in Italy with a sample of four hundred respondents

Care and Maintenance

Ingun Grimstad Klepp

Translated by Stig Erik Sørheim

Kjetil Enstad

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Care and maintenance are important for both durability and appearance of clothes. Historically, clothing and textiles have been among the most precious possessions of a household, and extensive repairs and careful maintenance were worthwhile. Many people owned only one set of clothes; in poor families, the mother stayed up past bedtime because repairs had to be made when the clothes had been taken off for the night. Even for better-off women, mending and patching were everyday tasks. They have be

Materials

Giorgio Riello

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Before 1800, fashionable individuals were defined as much by the textiles they chose as the styles they wore. There are characteristics shared by all textiles. First, they were used by people across society to construct notions of worth and appropriateness. Second, their importance in medieval, early modern, and modern European societies was linked to their value. Before industrialization reduced production costs, textiles remained generally luxuries. A third shared characteristic was their ubiqu

Care of Dress

Patricia Campbell Warner

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Until the twentieth century, the care of clothing generally meant arduous back-breaking work undertaken by females. Traditionally, outer clothing was protected from the body, even as the body was protected from the outer clothing, by linen shifts, shirts, petticoats, and sometimes drawers. For most people, these items were washed only when absolutely necessary. As for the rest of the clothes, until the age of cotton, which began in the late eighteenth century, most simply were never washed at all

Garment Washing

Annie Gullingsrud

Foreword by Lynda Grose

Illustrations by Amy Williams

Source: Fashion Fibers. Designing For Sustainability, 2001, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Although dry processing techniques involve no chemicals, they do create environmental impacts, including extraction of abrasive media from natural habitats, the transport of material to the processing facility (often surprisingly long distances), and the landfilling of spent abrasive media. Dry techniques such as sandblasting can also involve considerable occupational health and safety hazards for operators, and proper safety precautions, such as appropriate personal protective equipment and adeq

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