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Yarn Basics

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Yarns are the basic materials of the knitting process. Yarns are made from fibers, which are either staple or filament. Staple fibers are naturally short or cut filament fibers that are spun together to create yarn. Filament fibers are continuous in length. Many types of yarns are available, from natural in raw or regenerated form to manufactured synthetics to blends, making the assortment tremendous. Further improvements in technology and in the manufacturing and processing of fibers have made y

Computer-Aided Design for Knitwear

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Doug Ross at MIT coined the phrase “computer-aided design” in 1959.Douglas T. Ross, http://groups.csail.mit.edu/mac/projects/studentaut/ncworld/NCWorld_DR_photo.htm.CAD, by definition, is the use of computer technology as a tool to design products. The products that the programs design and create depend on the user. Specialized CAD programs are used by fashion designers, textile designers, industrial designers, architects, graphic designers, engineers, and a host of others. The list of creative u

Draping on the Mannequin

Anette Fischer and Kiran Gobin

Source: Construction for Fashion Design, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

There is a vast range of mannequins available. It is vital before starting with the drape to have a close look at the model stand you are working on. Take measurements and analyze the general shape of the stand to work out if it covers the look and size you are after. In addition, you should have the following tools and equipment to hand before starting to drape.

Finishes

Anette Fischer and Kiran Gobin

Source: Construction for Fashion Design, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A lining can be added to a garment as an extra layer for several different purposes—to ensure that the shape of the garment is retained, for warmth or for design and comfort. It will also hide all the internal construction details. A lining can be worked in and can either cover the whole of the garment or act as a half lining. It can also be detachable as a zip-in or button-in version. Usually, jackets, coats, skirts and trousers are lined. The lining fabric can vary from silk and cotton to fur.

Sources of Buying Inspiration

David Shaw and Dimitri Koumbis

Source: Fashion Buying. From Trend Forecasting to Shop Floor, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A buyer will be faced with many challenges, but the greatest one by far is trying to create a seasonal range for both domestic and international markets. Retailers who invest in overseas markets will typically create buying teams for both national and international home office locations, ensuring that the target market is accurately reached in those locations.

Suppliers, Sourcing, and Communication

David Shaw and Dimitri Koumbis

Source: Fashion Buying. From Trend Forecasting to Shop Floor, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The fashion designer<>buyer relationship is very close—however, it is ultimately the buyer who makes the final decisions and takes responsibility for putting products into the range.

Research

Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale

Source: The Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

There is no point in trying to be fashionable. This book cannot tell you how to design fashion; it can only tell you what the ingredients are, ways to put them together, and many of the important things that you will need to consider when designing clothes. Clothing is only “fashionable” when your peers or the industry deem a design to be of the zeitgeist. It either is or it isn’t.

Design

Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale

Source: The Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A garment design needs three basic ingredients:

Fabrics and techniques

Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale

Source: The Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

It is of fundamental importance for every designer to understand the unique properties and qualities of fabrics. Choosing the right fabric for a garment is crucial to its success.

Construction

Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale

Source: The Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Before we can talk about the methods for constructing garments, we must first look at the array of tools and heavy-duty machinery involved in the process of construction. Listed below are some of the key tools.

Developing a collection

Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale

Source: The Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

As a fashion designer, you can work at various “levels” within the fashion industry. The choice of direction you make will depend on your training, ability, and interests—as well as, of course, how much you would like to be paid for your work. Finding your niche in fashion design may be something that you’ve been working toward from the beginning—or it may evolve more organically as you continue on your career path.

Capital of Luxury and Fashion

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Je suis un grand artist, j’ai la couleur de Delacroix, et je compose. Une toilette vaut un tableau.

Ups and Downs of Paris Fashion

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Nous sortions d’une époque de guerre, d’uniformes, de femmessoldats aux carrures de boxeurs. Je dessinai des femmes-fleurs, épaules douces, bustes épanouis, tailles fines comme lianes et jupes larges comme corolles.ChristianDior, Christian Dior et moi (Paris: Amiot-Domont, 1956), p. 35. Translation in text by Valerie Steele.

The Business of Fashion

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: In Fashion, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Fashion is a business, affected by the same technological advances, investment patterns, and economic forces that affect other major businesses in the world. Fashion is not just limited to apparel, and it impacts our complete lifestyle as well as the products that we buy. Fashion influences the automobile, housing, and entertainment industries, and like these industries, it is shaped by the basic principles of business and economics.

Collaborations: “X” Marks the Spot

Jon Cope and Dennis Maloney

Source: Fashion Promotion in Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this chapter, we explore the collaboration phenomenon, defining key terms, and offering a brief history of seminal alliances. We describe the role of collaboration in making high fashion more accessible—even democratic—and outline the different collaboration types, clarifying their promotional and commercial value. Interviews with practitioners offer details on how to broker the perfect brand match, and how the collaboration trend can maintain its momentum.

Fashion Film: from Hollywood to Hoxton

Jon Cope and Dennis Maloney

Source: Fashion Promotion in Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The relationship between fashion and moving image is long established and exhaustively documented, particularly in cinema. Countless “defining style moments” exist, from Annie Hall to Zoolander, and similarly there is a wealth of academic research on the subject, often debating the role of costume not only on our psyche, but also in wider culture and consumption.

Sharing, Communication, and Output

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book part

Developing your practice

Sarah Kettley

Source: Designing with Smart Textiles, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Designers embarking on the development of products within the hybrid mix of smart textiles and wearable electronics must research fiber types and constructions and their applications, found beyond the limits of the traditional fashion sector.

What are smart textiles?

Sarah Kettley

Source: Designing with Smart Textiles, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The process of integrating textiles and technology isn’t just surface deep; it actually begins at a molecular level.

The smart textile product: design processes

Sarah Kettley

Source: Designing with Smart Textiles, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The term textile designer no longer has a simple definition—the role comprises a myriad of descriptions, including: engineer, inventor, scientist, designer and creative.

Design with smart textiles

Sarah Kettley

Source: Designing with Smart Textiles, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Our possibly utopian hope is that e-textile design can, over time, become a means through which hobbyists, craftspeople . . . and children can become technologically fluent—and can express themselves creatively.

Designing your own smart textile

Sarah Kettley

Source: Designing with Smart Textiles, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

When working with complex and technological compositions, it is easy to get entangled in time-consuming functional details and thereby lose touch with the overall expression.

Introduction to Size Specification and Technical Design

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

National and designer brand merchandise is owned by manufacturing companies called wholesalers. The brands are produced in factories owned or contracted by the wholesaler, then purchased by various retail establishments. Brands are widely recognized by consumers, in part due to national advertising. Free People, Stussy, and 7 for All Mankind are a few of the popular brands reported by blogger Olivia Newton of the hip British Youth market.Which are the brands that Millennials love, hate or worse h

Introduction to Couture

Zoya Nudelman

Source: The Art of Couture Sewing, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Today the center of couture is still in France, and each house spends millions each year to show its collections to the world twice a year. Each show is so grand it becomes almost a theatrical production. The shows attract important publicity on TV and in newspapers, magazines, and blogs on the Internet, helping the couture houses survive. The most popular designs from the shows are quickly copied into mass-produced clothing at all price levels.

Collections and their influences

Elinor Renfrew and Colin Renfrew

Source: Developing a Fashion Collection, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Every season, designers strive to develop their signature look or visual identity through their collections. Often they reference a number of sources and influences relevant to the current global, political, and social climate. For example, the emergence of deconstruction and reconstruction is evident during times of recession, such as in the early 1990s and during the economic downturn of the late 2000s. New, radical directions in fashion are often a reflection of, or a reaction to, the excesses

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