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Dai Rees

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Introduction

Ariel Beaujot

Source: Victorian Fashion Accessories 2012

Book chapter

In order to write this book, I had to think about who the middle class were, and what people who identified themselves as “middle class” thought they had in common. These questions, that seem simple at first, turned out to be quite complex. The middle class was a very diverse grouping in the nineteenth century. It was both an economic classification and an imaginary social category. It included people ranging from the ill-paid spinsters, who made a meager salary designing fashionable objects, to

James, Charles

Elizabeth Ann Coleman

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Milliners

Susie Hopkins

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Explore
Making and Retailing Exclusive Dress in Australia—1940s to 1960s

Roger Leong

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

From the 1940s through to the 1960s a handful of Australian society dressmakers, milliners, and quality stores made and sold couture-quality fashion. These key purveyors of exclusive and custom-made dress were found mainly in Sydney and Melbourne. They catered to an elite group of women, regarded as the leaders of fashionable society, whose demands for exclusive styles grew considerably after World War II. In the same period a small number of media organizations and department stores joined force

1910

Steven Zdatny (ed)

Source: Hairstyles and Fashion. A Hairdresser’s History of Paris, 1910–1920 1999

Book chapter

It will, I imagine, be generally conceded that Marcel waving constitutes for the ladies’ hairdresser a great Trade improvement – an excellent means of enhancing the appearance of the human hair and of the feminine headdress. From the point of view of the public, Marcel waving is indisputably an important element in the ladies’ toilet. Consequently, it will not – it cannot – disappear. But its great popularity, which was described, and not without reason, as bordering almost on a craze, undoubtedl

1915

Steven Zdatny (ed)

Source: Hairstyles and Fashion. A Hairdresser’s History of Paris, 1910–1920 1999

Book chapter

Since the commencement of the war, that is to say from the time when modesty and simplicity took the place of the previous brilliant fashions, I have endeavored to publish a few ideas in the hope that they might prove profitable to my fellow hairdressers, whose businesses are naturally feeling the bad effects produced by current events.

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