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Photography in Fashion Advertising since 1970

Paul Jobling

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Photography began to make inroads into advertising—including fashion publicity—by the start of the twentieth century following the evolution of the halftone process in the 1880s. By the 1930s the shift toward photographic methods became more pronounced in advertising, though in fashion publicity line illustrations remained the preferred medium. These could be reproduced more easily (especially when it came to color) but also, given that the visual quality of halftones on newsprint could be somewh

Helena Christensen

Laura Peach

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

As one of the main supermodels in the 1990s, Helena Christensen was frequently photographed for fashion magazines. Born to a Peruvian mother and Danish father, Christensen was raised in Denmark. Her modeling career began when she was a contestant in the Miss Universe beauty pageant in 1986. Shortly after, her modeling career took off in Paris. Although she frequently modeled highly stylized and ostentatious looks, Christensen’s personal style was one of bohemian chic, and off the runway she was s

Appraised, Displayed, and Concealed: Fashion Photography on The Swedish Museum Stage

Anna Dahlgren

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

Röhsska Museet, founded in 1916, is dedicated to fashion, design, and craft. It currently holds a collection of 50,000 artifacts; dresses and accessories and other artifacts from the fashion system, but the collection contains only a handful of fashion photographs.When this text was written in 2011 Röhsska had not a single fashion photograph in the collection, www.designmuseum.se and telephone interview with Anna Billing-Wetterlundh, curator, Röhsska Museet, April 26, 2011. Since then the museum

Current Issues in The Fashion Media: Industry Roundtable

Djurdja Bartlett, Shaun Cole and Agnès Rocamora (eds)

Source: Fashion Media. Past and Present 2013

Book chapter

Laura Bradley, former fashion features editor at SHOWstudio, editor of i-D online (at the time of the conference), and now editor of Another.com and commissioning editor of Another Magazine

Fashion Photography

Patrik Aspers

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The production system behind fashion photography is a collaboration among many sectors in the fashion industry. A photographer takes fashion pictures, usually of models wearing clothes. Garment firms produce the clothes, which are intended to be worn by consumers. Present at the set—that is, the place where the pictures are taken—are often a makeup artist, a hairstylist, and a fashion stylist, all of whom may have assistants. The pictures will be processed and edited on a computer, and they will

Early French Fashion Photography

Marie Botkin

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The desire to represent nature as it was marked the advent of photography, with as much detail as the lens would permit. Photography in the early 1800s, as Frenchman Louis Daguerre developed it in the daguerreotype, used a technique that lent itself more to the creation of images resembling an eighteenth-century miniature than a photographic image in the twenty-first century. Daguerre did not envision his work in sun printing in the 1830s as a form of self-expression or as a way to circulate the

Jacques-Henri Lartigue

Marie Botkin

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

See alsoEarly French Fashion Photography.

Visual Media and Dress

Stella Bruzzi and Pamela Gibson Church

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Visual media have played an enormous role in the development of fashion in West Europe. Fashion imagery emerged within print journalism, more specifically women’s magazines, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The development of popular cinema in the first half of the twentieth century had a momentous impact on the global fashion industry, especially in the star system, the “tie-in,” and the involvement of both couturiers and ready-to-wear designers in film. From the radical changes of th

French Fashion Photography, 1950 Onward

Muriel Berthou Crestey

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

From the 1950s, technical developments reduced the weight of photographic equipment and so contributed to the metamorphosis of fashion photography. The use of the Rolleiflex, flashes that allowed artificial light, and the development of new printing methods played a key role internationally and also in the emergence of a “French school.” The styles of the Groupe des XV photographers such as Philippe Pottier, Robert Doisneau, and the Séeberger brothers, or Italians such as Edigio Scaïoni or Frank

Horst, Horst P.

William Ewing

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Horst Bohrmann was born in Weissenfels-an-der-Saale, Thuringia, in 1906, the second son of prosperous, middle-class, Protestant parents. The family suffered financial hardships as a result of World War I but eventually recovered in the 1920s, enabling Horst to attend the Hamburg School of Applied Art, where he studied furniture making and carpentry. Exposure to Bauhaus principles and personalities led him to seek an apprenticeship in Paris with Le Corbusier. However, Horst was disappointed both w

Avedon, Richard

William Ewing

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Newton, Helmut

Philippe Garner

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Helmut Newton became an exceptional social anthropologist, constructing images that were always based on his close observations. His was a documentary project that involved reconstructing the essence of what he had seen, and doing so with the mordant wit of a satirist. While his pictures can have a theatrical extravagance of gesture or context, their incisiveness, credibility, and substance derive from their being always grounded in the realities of the worlds that he illustrated. Newton was not

Photographic and Other Visual Sources

Christraud M. Geary

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dress in Africa has attracted the attention of foreign observers since the earliest encounters with peoples on the continent. Whether they deemed it exotic, curious, ugly, beautiful, or comical, writers of all backgrounds often mentioned and depicted dress in their publications. From the seventeenth century onward, descriptions of Africa were published with engravings, woodcuts, and, later, lithographs, among other types of illustrations, that helped readers to envision faraway worlds and peoples

Hollywood Style

Pamela Church Gibson

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Hollywood studios were beginning to appreciate their power. The studio system, which lasted until the 1950s, meant that stars and costume designers were under contract to a particular studio, which could profit from their work. The studios owned distribution rights in cinemas across America, and it was easy to export Hollywood films, first to Europe and later worldwide, despite the existence of national cinemas elsewhere. In the early 2000s, despite the vast size of the Hindi film industry, Ameri

Fashion Photography

Nancy Hall-Duncan

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The earliest fashion photographs were made, probably in the 1850s and 1860s, to document fashion for Parisian fashion houses. Reproduction in fashion journals occurred much later, between 1881 (with the invention of the halftone printing process by Frederic Eugene Ives) and 1886 (when the refinement of the process made it financially practicable). This breakthrough made it possible to reproduce photographs and sell to a large audience through the medium of the printed page.

Beaton, Cecil

Nancy Hall-Duncan

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The most important influence on Beaton’s fashion photography was his interest in stage design and theatrical production, in which he was extremely accomplished. He did costume design for the film Gigi and set and costume design for the play and the film My Fair Lady, receiving Oscars for both. He also designed for the Metropolitan Opera, the Comédie Française, the Royal Ballet (London), and the American Ballet Theatre. “Completely stage struck” at an early age, he wrote in his Photobiography that

Bourdin, Guy

Nancy Hall-Duncan

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Guy Bourdin was born in Paris. His mother abandoned him when he was still an infant, and he was alternately raised by his grandparents in Normandy and Paris and placed in a boarding school. Bourdin was the only child to the age of fifteen, when his brother, Michael, was born, and he spent much time in the solitary pursuits of reading and drawing.

Dahl-Wolfe, Louise

Nancy Hall-Duncan

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

After completing her studies, Dahl-Wolfe designed electric signs from 1921 to 1923; in 1924 she began working for a leading decorator. In 1921 she was invited to the studio of photographer Anne Brigman; this meeting prompted her to buy her first camera, an Eastman bellows camera with a reflector made from a Ghirardelli chocolate box. She used her mother as the subject of her first pictures. Early photographic adventures included taking shots of herself and some friends nude on a beach, using the

Fashion Magazines

Brian Moeran

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion magazines are both cultural products and commodities. As cultural products, they circulate in a cultural economy of collective meanings. They provide how-to recipes, illustrated stories, narratives, and experiential and behavioral models—particularly in the realms of fashion and beauty—in which the reader’s ideal self is reflected and on which she can herself reflect and act. As commodities, fashion magazines are products of the publishing and print industries and important sites for the

Penn, Irving

Robert Muir

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Penn studied at the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art (1934–1938). Alexey Brodovitch, art director of Harper’s Bazaar, whose design seminars Penn attended, introduced him to fashion magazines; moreover, he hired Penn to be his assistant during two summers. Brodovitch published some of Penn’s illustrations in 1937. In the same year, Penn undertook a series of street photographs of the shop signs and facades of New York, where he was laying the groundwork for a career in the fashion worl

Fashion Photography in Australia

Daniel Palmer and Kate Rhodes

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Australian fashion photography has a relatively short history, starting with the earliest examples of fashion advertisements from the beginning of the twentieth century through to the popularization of the genre in Australia via the work of modernist photographers such as Max Dupain and the postwar heyday of Helmut Newton and others. An exploration of the strong voice of independent publishers who have helped to market Australian fashion and style is noted and includes the internationally recogni

Dress and Art: Western

Sandra L. Rosenbaum

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Images of people wearing clothing create an obvious connection between dress and art. Because relatively few examples of historic garments survive, these images document the history of dress. Historically, those sitting for portraits chose their dress to project a specific image; the artist was responsible for conveying messages encoded in dress, meticulously reproducing them. Ann Rosalind Jones and Peter Stallybrass have commented that Renaissance clothes were perceived as material forms of pers

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